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Chapter 13 PowerPoint Presentation

Chapter 13

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Chapter 13

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  1. Chapter 13 STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

  2. Questions the Statement of Cash Flow Answers

  3. The Primary Purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows Is... • To provide information about: • cash receipts, • cash payments, and • the net change in cash resulting from: • operating, • investing, and • financing activities of a company during a period.

  4. Why Report the Causes of Changes in Cash? Because investors, creditors, and other interested parties want to know what is happening to a company’s most liquid asset, CASH Follow the cash to know what’s really happening in the business!

  5. Usefulness of the Statement of Cash Flow • The entity’s ability to generate future cash flows. • The entity’s ability to pay dividends and meet obligations. • The reason for the difference between net income and net cash provided (used) by operating activities. • The cash investing and financing transactions during the period.

  6. Involve Income Statement Items Operating Activities... Include: • The cash effects of transactions that create revenues and expenses and • Enter into determination of net income.

  7. Operating Activities… Types of Cash Flows • Cash inflows: • From sale of goods or services • From return on loans (interest received) and on equity securities (dividends received) • Cash outflows: • To suppliers for inventory • To employees for services • To government for taxes • To lenders for interest • To others for expenses

  8. Involve Investments and Noncurrrent Asset Items Investing Activities... Include: • Purchasing and disposing of investments and productive long-lived assets using cash and • Lending money and collecting the loans.

  9. Investing Activities...Types of Cash Flows • Cash inflows: • From sale of property, plant, and equipment • From sale of debt or equity securities of other entities • From collection of principal on loans to other entities • Cash outflows: • To purchase property, plant, and equipment • To purchase debt or equity securities of other entities • To make loans to other entities

  10. Involve Noncurrent Liability and Stockholders’ Equity Items Financing Activities... Include: • Obtaining cash from issuing debt and repaying the amounts borrowed and • Obtaining cash from stockholders and paying dividends.

  11. Financing Activities...Types of Cash Flows • Cash inflows: • From sale of equity securities (company's own stock) • From issuance of debt (bonds and notes) • Cash outflows: • To stockholders as dividends • To redeem long-term debt or reacquire capital stock

  12. Operating Activities - ALERT Some cash flows relating to investing or financing activities are classified as operating activities. For example... • Receipts of investment revenue (interest and dividends) and • Payments of interest to lenders are classified as operating activities because these items are reported in the income statement.

  13. Significant Noncash Activities... • That do NOT affect cash are NOT reported in the body of the statement of cash flows. • Are reported: • In a separate schedule at the bottom of the statement of cash flows or • In a separate note or supplementary schedule to the financial statements.

  14. Significant Noncash Activities... 1. Issuance of common stock to purchase assets. 2. Conversion of bonds into common stock. 3. Issuance of debt to purchase assets. 4. Exchanges of plant assets.

  15. Question Which is an example of a cash flow from an operating activity? a.Payment of cash to lenders for interest. b.Receipt of cash from the sale of capital stock. c.Payment of cash dividends to the company’s stockholders. d.None of the above.

  16. a.Payment of cash to lenders for interest. b.Receipt of cash from the sale of capital stock. c.Payment of cash dividends to the company’s stockholders. d.None of the above. Question Which is an example of a cash flow from an operating activity?

  17. Plus significant noncash investing and financing activities in separate schedule or at bottom of the. Format Three parts: • Operating • Investing • Financing Body of Statement

  18. Major Steps in Preparing Statement of Cash Flows

  19. Major Steps in Preparing Statement of Cash Flows In order to perform step 1 a company MUST convert net income from a cash to accrual basis. Can used theDirect MethodorIndirect Method Over Ninety-eight (98.8)% of companies use the indirect method.

  20. Indirect Method • The indirect method is used extensively in practice. • Most companies favor the indirect method for the following reasons: • it is easier to prepare. • it focuses on the differences between net income and net cash flow from operating activities. • it tends to reveal less company information to competitors.

  21. Statement Of Cash FlowsIndirect Method • Start with Net Income

  22. Determine Net Cash Provided/Used By Operating Activities • Adjust net income for items that did not affect cash. • Net income must be converted because • Noncash expenses, such as depreciation must be added back. • Earned revenues may include credit sales that have not been collected in cash. • Expenses incurred that may not have been paid.

  23. Constructing the Statement of Cash Flows Using Noncash Balance Sheet Accounts Increases in noncash asset accounts imply uses of cash. Example: Inventory is purchased on credit from a supplier. It is implied that cash was used to acquire the inventory.

  24. Constructing the Statement of Cash Flows Using Noncash Balance Sheet Accounts Decreases in noncash assets accounts imply sources of cash. Example: Accounts receivable decreases when a customer pays their bill. When the customer pays his bill, the company’s cash increases.

  25. Constructing the Statement of Cash Flows Using Noncash Balance Sheet Accounts Increases in liability accounts imply sources of cash. Example: Inventory is purchased on credit from a supplier. It is implied that an increase in a payable has the effect of increasing cash available for other uses.

  26. I.O.U. Constructing the Statement of Cash Flows Using Noncash Balance Sheet Accounts Decreases in liability accounts imply uses of cash. Example: The company made a payment on a note payable held by a creditor. When the company makes the payment, cash decreases.

  27. Question Which of the following would be considered a "use" of cash for purposes of constructing a statement of cash flows? • an increase in accounts payable. • an increase in prepaid expenses. • an increase in accrued liabilities. • an increase in accumulated depreciation.

  28. Question Which of the following would be considered a "use" of cash for purposes of constructing a statement of cash flows? • an increase in accounts payable. • an increase in prepaid expenses. • an increase in accrued liabilities. • an increase in accumulated depreciation.

  29. Net Income (Loss) $ XXX Add: Decr. in Current Noncash Assets XXX Incr. in Current Liabilities XXX Depreciation Charges XXX Losses XXX Less: Incr. in Current Noncash Assets (XXX) Decr. in Current Liabilities (XXX) Gains (XXX) Net Cash Flows from Operating Activities $ XXX Operating Activities Includes those activities that enter into the determination of net income

  30. Add: Proceeds from sale of land, buildings, equipment, or other noncurrent assets $ XXX Receipt of principal from investments XXX Less: Payments to acquire land, buildings, equipment, or other noncurrent assets (XXX) Payments to acquire investments (XXX) Net Cash Flows from Investment Activities $ XXX Investing Activities Includes transactions that involve the acquisition or disposal of noncurrent assets.

  31. Add: Proceeds from borrowings $ XXX Proceeds from issuing capital stock XXX Proceeds from sale of bonds XXX Less: Principal payments on borrowed funds (XXX) Payments related to bond maturities (XXX) Dividend payments (XXX) Net Cash Flows from Investment Activities $ XXX Financing Activities Includes transactions involving receipts from or payments to creditors and owners.

  32. Question Which is an example of a cash flow from a financing activity? a.Receipt of cash from sale of land. b.Issuance of debt for cash. c. Purchase of equipment for cash. d.None of the above.

  33. Question Which is an example of a cash flow from a financing activity? a.Receipt of cash from sale of land. b.Issuance of debt for cash. c. Purchase of equipment for cash. d.None of the above.

  34. Question An increase in the Interest Payable account of a company from $0 at the beginning of the year, to $1,000 at the end of the year, would be shown on the company's statement of cash flows prepared under the indirect method as: • a source of cash of $1,000 in Operating Activities. • a use of cash of $1,000 in Operating Activities. • a source of cash of $1,000 in Investing Activities. • a use of cash of $1,000 in Financing Activities.

  35. Question An increase in the Interest Payable account of a company from $0 at the beginning of the year, to $1,000 at the end of the year, would be shown on the company's statement of cash flows prepared under the indirect method as: • a source of cash of $1,000 in Operating Activities. • a use of cash of $1,000 in Operating Activities. • a source of cash of $1,000 in Investing Activities. • a use of cash of $1,000 in Financing Activities.

  36. Indirect and Direct Methods • Both methods arrive at the same total amount for “Net cash provided by Operating Activities”. • The methods differ in disclosing the items that make up the total amount. • The choice of methods affects only the operating activities section; the investing and financing activities sections are the same.

  37. Direct Method • The FASB prefers the direct method but allows the use of either method. • When the direct method is used, the net cash flow from operating activities as computed using the indirect method must also be reported in a separate schedule.

  38. Technology Services Company Statement of Cash Flows--Direct Method (Partial) For the Year Ended December 31, 2008 Cash flows from operating activities Cash receipts from customers $ 765,000 Cash payments To supplier $550,000 For operating expenses 158,000 For income taxes 48,000 756,000 Net cash provided by operating activities $ 9,000

  39. Formula to Compute Cash Receipts from Customers-Direct Method

  40. Formula to Compute Cash Payment to Suppliers - Direct Method

  41. Formula to Compute Cash Payments for Operating Expenses-Direct Method

  42. Indirect Method Net income is reconciled to cash flow from operating activities. No supplemental schedule is required. Used by 98.8% of companies. Direct Method Net income is reconstructed on a cash basis. Requires a supplemental reconciliation of net income to cash flow from operating activities. Used by 1.2% of companies. Direct Method or Indirect Method?

  43. Product Life Cycle • A series of phases all products go through • The phases are often referred to as the: • introductory phase • growth phase • maturity phase • decline phase • The phase a company is in affects its cash flows.

  44. Introductory Phase To support asset purchases the company may issue stock or debt. Expect: • cash from operations to be negative. • cash from investing to to be negative. • cash from financing to be positive.

  45. Growth Phase The company is striving to expand its production and sales. Expect: • small amounts of cash to be generated from operations. • cash from investing to be negative. • cash from financing to be positive.

  46. Maturity Phase Sales and production level-off. Expect: • cash from operations to exceed investing needs. • cash from investing to be neutral. • cash from financing to be negative.

  47. Decline Phase Sales and production decline. Expect: • cash from operations to decline. • cash from investing to possibly become positive. • cash from financing to possibly become negative.

  48. Impact of Product Life Cycle on Cash Flows

  49. Free Cash Flow • In the Statement of Cash Flows, cash from operations is intended to indicate the cash-generating capability of the company. • Statement of Cash flows fails to take into account that a company must invest in new fixed assets to maintain its current level of operations and it must maintain dividends at current levels to satisfy investors.

  50. Free Cash Flow Cash Provided By Operations – Capital Expenditures – Dividends Paid Free Cash Flow