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Access Needs as Defined by the EEC Wait List PowerPoint Presentation
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Access Needs as Defined by the EEC Wait List

Access Needs as Defined by the EEC Wait List

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Access Needs as Defined by the EEC Wait List

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Access Needs as Defined by the EEC Wait List Board Meeting September 18, 2012

  2. Goals • To review the information available in the wait list to determine the needs for access to child care as defined by data in the waitlist • To establish policy priorities for serving children and families on the waitlist • To determine the average amount of time children are on the waitlist by age group

  3. KinderWait Overview • KinderWait is EEC’s web-based central waitlist system that was launched in summer of 2011 in order create a single database for collecting information statewide • Main functions include: • Application intake for Income Eligible children. • Performs an eligibility check and identifies the Eligibility (No Eligible Program, Income Eligible, Head start) • Waitlist management: • Tracks family application status. • Supplies Providers with information regarding families that meet their enrollment criteria.

  4. KinderWait access • Who has access to KinderWait? • EEC Regional Offices • Contract Providers • CCRRs • Mass211 • Coordinated Family and Community Engagement Programs • KinderWait client access is available to those families that are on the waitlist. • When families are added to the waitlist they are offered online access to a self service tool. • They can update their application as needed and access their information. • A future KinderWait release will add the ability for families to view their status and to see from whom they have received available funding notifications.

  5. Age Groups Definitions • Data presented falls into the following age groups: • Infant: 0 to 14 months • Toddler: 15 to 32 months • Preschool: 33 to 59 months • School age: 60 months and above

  6. Number of Active Children on the Wait List by age group Note: Data represented is self reported need as indicated by a parent, guardian or family member

  7. Number of Active Children on the Wait List by age group

  8. Number of Active Children on the Wait List by EEC Region Data is as of 8/1/2012

  9. Duration on Wait List prior to enrollment (Aug 2011 to Aug 2012)

  10. Number Available Funding Letters Sent by Age Group in the Last Year (Aug 2011 to Aug 2012)

  11. Access needs for Gateway Cities As of August 2012

  12. Access needs for Gateway Cities..continue As of August 2012

  13. Access needs for Gateway Cities..continued As of August 2012

  14. Access needs for Gateway Cities..continue As of August 2012

  15. Summer 2012 Wait List information • Summer Only Wait List children refer to School Age children only (60 months of age or older) • Notes: • 2011 numbers are lower due to newness of KinderWait application (launched in 2011) • Summer Only Care EMB was sent on June 15,2012

  16. Number of siblings of children enrolled on the Wait List by region As of August 2012 Note: Sibling Access was opened 4/12/12 and closed on 5/2/12

  17. Number of children enrolled in last 90 days (May 2012 - Aug 2012)

  18. Average time on wait list for children enrolled in last 90 days Infants had the lowest waiting period(5.3 months) while Toddlers had the highest (8 months) (May 2012 - Aug 2012)

  19. Children that may be eligible for Head Start and Early Head Start The Head Start Program is a nationally funded program that promotes school readiness through quality early educational experiences and services including: Health, Mental Health, Nutrition, Social Services and Parent Involvement. Early Head Start program was established to serve children from birth to 35 months of age. Early Head Start Program promotes healthy prenatal outcomes, healthy families and infant and toddler development. As of August 2012

  20. Conclusion and Next Steps • Continue to monitor the amount of time children are on the waitlist prior to receiving services • Understand parent choices for program types and geographic preferences vs. residence • Understand the impact of policy decisions on waitlist reductions • Review the access to care as a result of attrition in contracted slots especially when vouchers are closed • Currently EEC has one year worth of Wait List Data and anticipates better trending in year two of data collection/analysis • The renewal process will help keep the information accurate by reaching out to families annually to confirm their needs

  21. Appendix – Extra Slides

  22. School Age distribution for children on the Wait List As of August 2012