Download
the bubonic plague n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
The Bubonic Plague PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
The Bubonic Plague

The Bubonic Plague

226 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

The Bubonic Plague

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. The Bubonic Plague By Martin Jones and Jonah Grob

  2. What was The Bubonic Plague? • The Bubonic Plague, also known as the Black Death was a disease that swept through Europe, killing around twenty-five million people.

  3. Where did it come from? • The Plague started in 1347 • Dark Age doctors thought the disease came from rats. However the real source of the disease came from the fleas the infected rats carried.

  4. What were the symptoms? • People infected with the Black Death quickly developed a high fever, headache, chills, muscle pain and began coughing. • Once these symptoms were displayed, there was no way to save the victim.

  5. How Was it Transported? • The Plague was brought to Europe by a merchant fleet carrying trading goods from The Black Sea in Asia, to Manilla, a town in southern Italy.

  6. Death, Death and more Death • The Bubonic Plague killed one third of the entire population in Europe.That means one out of every three people were killed. This picture shows the widespread destruction the plague inflicted.

  7. Death cont. • So many people died that survivors were unable to bury them all, instead people were buried hundreds at a time in pits called mass graves.

  8. How did the Plague impact society? • Because of the widespread death, Employment plummeted and surviving workers demanded increasingly high pay. • As a result, inflation began to rise rapidly.

  9. What was the final impact? • The Black Death caused most trade between countries and peoples to stop. • It brought back times of Feudal leaders. • However, some historians speculate that the Bubonic Plague issued in an era of peace and prosperity culminating in the Renaissance.

  10. Bibliography • Works Cited • about.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Feb. 2010. <http://about.com>. • Dowling, Mr. Mr.Dowling.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Feb. 2010. <http://Mr.Dowling.com>. • Ellis, Elizabeth Gaynor, and Anthony Esler. “The Black Death.” World History. 2009. Print. • Encyclopedia Judaica. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Feb. 2010. • UVMC. N.p., n.d. Web. 22 Feb. 2010. <http://uvmc.umc>.