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Balancing Bottom-up and Top-down Cluster Activities – The Case of North-Rhine-Westphalia PowerPoint Presentation
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Balancing Bottom-up and Top-down Cluster Activities – The Case of North-Rhine-Westphalia

Balancing Bottom-up and Top-down Cluster Activities – The Case of North-Rhine-Westphalia

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Balancing Bottom-up and Top-down Cluster Activities – The Case of North-Rhine-Westphalia

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  1. 13th TCI Global Competitiveness Conference MDI/Gurgaon Nov. 29 - Dec03 2010 Balancing Bottom-up and Top-downCluster Activities – The Case of North-Rhine-Westphalia Dieter Rehfeld Institute for Work and Technology, Gelsenkirchen

  2. Helsinki Oslo Stockholm Tallinn Moscow Riga Copenhagen Dublin Vilnius Hamburg Minsk Berlin Amsterdam London Warsaw Dsseldorf Brussels Kiev Frankfurt Prague Bratislava Paris Munich Vienna Budapest Bern Bucharest Zagreb Ljubljana Sarajewo Belgrade Madrid Sofia Tirana Skopje Istanbul Rome Lisbon Athens Nicosia Valletta NRW – located in thecoreof Europe

  3. North Rhine-Westphalia – in brief Gross domestic product 2009 (in EUR bn) *2008 **end of 2008; all other data 2009.

  4. Threesubregions in NRW • Rhine Axis (Bonn, Düsseldorf, Cologne, Aachen) • Technology, Knowledge Based Services, Creative Industries • Industrial Brands: Ford Germany, Bayer • Ruhr Area (Essen, Dortmund, Bochum, Duisburg) • Ongoing structural change, new industries (Logistics, ITC, Health Care) and renewed strength (New Materials and Nano Technology) • Industrial Brands: Krupp Thyssen, Evonic (former Degussa) • Westphalia (Münster, Bielefeld, Siegen) • Strong industrial base, rising technology intensity, SME and family company driven • Industrial Brands: Miele, Dr. Oetker, Claas, Wincor Nixdorf

  5. Steps in NRW’s Cluster Policy • Early 1990ies Initiative to support automotive suppliers • Mid 1990ies combining regional and sector activities (36 projects) • End 1990ies selected best practice (Dortmund-Project, ChemSite) • Early 2000s 12 fields of competence in the Ruhr Area • Mid 2000s 16 NRW-wide cluster initiatives • 2010 ???

  6. Situation Early 2000s • More than 50 NRW-wide initiatives (sector and/or technology) • More than 50 regional/local clusters or networks • Special approach in the Ruhr area: 12 fields of competence • Result in fragmented networks resp. clusters that are: • In a very different state of professionalization • Highly overlapping and partially competing • Regional and sector highly specialized

  7. Regional clustersandnetworks in NRW 1

  8. Regional clustersandnetworks in NRW 2

  9. Clusters in NRW

  10. Balancing dilemmas in cluster management Policy driven commitment Thematic interaction (project based) Administrative space Strong Commitment (SME) Dense Interaction Pragmatic spaces Different modes of division of labor Limited Resources Danger of lock-in „clustering around „ Strong resources Cross-cluster potentials Professional management Institutional innovation Excellent networks Global nods Branding

  11. Division of labor between regional networks and centralized cluster • Type one: Back-office • Companies are organized in strong regional networks • Each region has a thematic profile • Cluster helps in capacity building, marketing, scouting/technology foresight and so on regional clusters are present in the strategic boards of the clusters • Type two: Association • Cluster integrates the activities of regional networks, thematic networks and sector associations • Thematic promotion, coordination and lobbying • Type three: Promoter of strategic projects • Regional networks are weak and heterogeneous • Cluster organises thematic networks and lead projects • Type four: Triple Helix • Cluster focuses on linking research, companies and politics • Driven by technology and research projects

  12. Mix of sources for financing central clusters • Direct fees by companies • Indirect support by companies (sponsoring, free services, donating) • Fees by regional networks and associations • Companies pay for specific services (Fairs, conferences, information, support) • Network and research projects • Public support (collective goods, support for administration)

  13. Key actors in cluster management • Consortia of regional clusters • Business associations (sectoral) • Former state initiatives • Consultancies • Research institutes

  14. Future of cluster policy in NRW – Facing insecurity • Different approaches and common quality standards? • Long-standing political commitment? • New initiatives by European policy? • Lead markets • Social innovation • Integrative, sustainable and intelligent growth • Evaluation and reorientation? • Institutional modernization? • Innovative spaces?

  15. Q&A? Thank you for your attention!