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Chapter 3 Introduction to the Periodic Table

Chapter 3 Introduction to the Periodic Table

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Chapter 3 Introduction to the Periodic Table

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  1. Chapter 3Introduction to the Periodic Table Fill in the blanks in your notes with the words or phrases in red.

  2. Warm-up Questions #1 What is an octave? (Hint: look at the picture below) octave octave octave

  3. Development of the Modern Periodic Table • The Search for a Periodic Table… • Chemists wanted to organize the elements into a system that would show similarities while acknowledging differences. • Atomic mass used as the basis • J.W. Döbereiner (1829) • Classified some elements with similar properties into groups of three called triads • Their properties varied in an orderly way according to their atomic masses. • John Newlands (1864) • Created the law of octaves which stated that the properties of the elements repeated every eighth element

  4. Development of the Modern Periodic Table • DimitriMendeleev (1869) • Arranged the elements in order of increasing atomic mass into columns with similar properties • Predicted the existence and properties of undiscovered elements • Showed that the properties of the elements repeat in an orderly way from row to row of the table • Periodicity is the tendency to recur at regular intervals. • Henry Moseley (1913) • Discovered that atoms of each element contain a unique number of protons in their nuclei (=atomic number) • Arranged the elements in order of increasing atomic number to show a clear periodic pattern of properties • The statement that the physical and chemical properties of the elements repeat in a regular pattern when they are arranged in order of increasing atomic number is known as the periodic law.

  5. Development of the Modern Periodic Table

  6. Exit Question #1 What does the game “Battleship” have in common with the modern periodic table?

  7. Benchmark • Based on the presentation in slides 1-6 and the information on pages 86-94, you should be able to do homework #1 in your packet.

  8. Warm-up Question #2 What do the following objects all have in common?

  9. Classification of the Elements • The Modern Periodic Table… • Elements are arranged in order of increasing atomic number into a series of columns, called groups (or families), and rows, called periods. • The groups designated with an “A” are often referred to as the main group, or representative elements. • The groups designated with a “B” are referred to as the transition elements.

  10. Classification of the Elements • Metals are elements that are generally shiny when smooth and clean, solid at room temperature, and good conductors of heat and electricity. • Group 1A elements (except for hydrogen) are known as the alkali metals. • Group 2A elements are known as the alkaline earth metals. • Group B elements (transition elements) are divided into transition metals and inner transition metals • Lanthanide series and actinide series

  11. Classification of the Elements

  12. Classification of the Elements • Nonmetals are elements that are generally gases or brittle, dull-looking solids, and poor conductors of heat and electricity. • Group 7A elements are known as the halogens. • Group 8A elements are known as the noble gases.

  13. Classification of the Elements • Metalloids are elements with physical and chemical properties of both metals and nonmetals. • Semiconductors

  14. Exit Question #2 Why is the last group of the periodic table known as the noble gases?

  15. Benchmark • Based on the information on slides 8-14 and pages 95-113 of your text, you should now be able to complete homework #2

  16. Warm-up Question #3 Which one comes up next in the sequence?

  17. Periodic Trends • Atomic Radius… • Trends within periods • Decrease in atomic radii as you move left-to-right across a period • Trends within groups • Increase in atomic radii as you move down a group

  18. Periodic Trends • Electronegativity… • The electronegativity of an element indicates the relative ability of its atoms to attract electrons in a chemical bond. • Trend within periods • Increases as you move left-to-right across a period • Trend within groups • Decreases as you move down a group

  19. Periodic Trends • Valence Electrons… • Atoms in the same group have similar chemical properties because they have the same number of valence electrons. • The energy level of an atom’s valence electrons indicate the period in which it is found. • A representative element’s group number and the number of valence electrons it contains are equal (with a few exceptions). • Atoms can gain or lose one or more electrons and acquire a net charge. • An ion is at atom or a bonded group of atoms that has a positive or negative charge. • The octet rule states that atoms tend to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to acquire a full set of eight valence electrons.

  20. Exit Questions #3 Why do you think that the size of the atom increases as you go from the top of the periodic table to the bottom of the table?

  21. Benchmark • Based on the information on slides 16-20 alone, (this information is not in your book), you should be able to complete homework #3 • Your homework (#1-3) is due on Wednesday, 12/12. • The homework quiz is on Wednesday as well