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  1. We will… • Go over Parent and Family Engagement (PFE) Definition and Research • Key PFE requirements in Title I, Part A and Learning Assistance Program (LAP) • Answer questions • In-depth questions will be answered at the end of the presentation, or • Please send questions after the webinar via email or call our office (contact information on last slide) OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  2. Parent and Family Engagement Definition and research Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI)

  3. What is Parent and Family Engagement? • Currently Title I, Part A defines Parental Involvement as...the participation of parents in regular, two-way and meaningful communications with school staff that involves the student, addresses learning, and engages the family in school activities. • Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) has a new term beginning in school year 2017–18: • Parent and Family Engagement. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  4. Involvement vs. Engagement • The Latin root of the word “involvement” is “involvere” which means to wrap around, cover or envelop; roll, cause to roll. The Latin root of the word “engagement” is “engare” which means to make a formal agreement, to contract with; to pledge; an obligation to do something. Henderson, A., & Mapp, L. K. 2016 Family Engagement Harvard Institute in Education PowerPoint OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  5. Students with Engaged Parents and Families • Exhibit faster rates of literacy acquisition. • Have higher grades and test scores. • Are promoted and take more challenging classes. • Adapt better to school and have better attendance. • Have better social skills and behavior. • Graduate. • Go on to community/technical college or university. Henderson, A., & Mapp, L. K. 2002. A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family, and community connections on student achievement, annual synthesis 2002. Austin, TX: SEDL. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  6. Agents of Change in Parent and Family Engagement Technical vs. Adaptive Challenges Heifetz and Linsky OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  7. U.S. Department of Education’s (ED) Partners in Education, Dual Capacity-Framework • Partners in Education: A Dual Capacity-Building Framework for Family–School Partnerships is a publication of SEDL in collaboration with ED. • It presents a new framework for designing family engagement initiatives that build capacity among educators and families to partner with one another around student success. Based on existing research and best practices, this report is designed to act as a scaffold for the development of family engagement strategies, policies, and programs. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION Authors: Karen L. Mapp, Paul J. Kuttner, Lacy Wood (Production Coordinator), April West (Editor), Shaila Abdullah (Designer)

  8. Communication is the foundation for: • Sharing information. • Establishing shared goals for education. • Setting expectations for learning and behavior. • Keeping up on classroom activities and home events. • Helping parents support school instruction. • Helping teachers understand out of school time. • Avoiding misunderstandings. Webinar for US Department of Education Office of School Turnaround/School Support and Rural Programs, May 21, 2012 OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC Instruction

  9. Key Title I, Part A PFE Provisions Communication in General–The Essentials Other Languages & Parents with Disabilities OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  10. 1/3 367,587 707,520 Total Student Population in WA State 1,075,107 OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION WA State Report Card and Consolidated State Performance Report Part II

  11. English Learners & Non-English Households WA Students 1,088,960 19% 10% OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION OSPI Student Information Data Report 2014-15 and 2015-16, October 1 enrollment

  12. Top 9 Languages in Washington Schools OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION *OSPI Student Information Data Report 2014–15 and 2015–16, October 1 enrollment

  13. Interpretation and Translation Requirements, Resources Do • Interpretation and Translation Services • Under state and federal law, all parents have the right to information about their child’s education in a language they can understand. Title IV Regulations | Chapter 28A.642 RCW | Chapter 392-190 WAC • http://www.k12.wa.us/Equity/Interpretation.aspx • You will find: • Parents’ Rights: Interpretation and Translation Services • Fact Sheet: Information for Limited-English Proficient Parents • Poster: We can Help you in Your Language! OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  14. Communication and Parents with Disabilities • Make sure to: Have proper supports and services when needed to give a parent with a disability an equal opportunity to participate…Honor their choice of communication.* * Unless the SEA, LEA, or school can demonstrate that another effective means of communication exists, or that use of the means chosen by the parent would result in a fundamental alteration of the service, program, or activity, or in an undue financial and administrative burden. [28 CFR Sections 35.104 and 35.160–164, and Appendix A to Part 35 of Title 28T of the CFR Implementing Subtitle A of Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990] OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  15. Parent and Family Engagement Title I, Part A and LAP Compliance, best practices and resources

  16. PFE Topics for Today • Policy development, notification, and dissemination • Technical assistance and coordination • Building capacity • Evaluating the PFE policy and program • School-parent compact • Funding  and allowable costs • OSPI’s Citizen Complaint Process dissemination • PFE and Rural Education • LAP and PFE • Consolidated Program Review (CPR) and PFE Resources OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  17. PFE Policy • District & School Level • Jointly Developed (parents and staff) • Annual Dissemination OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  18. PFE Notifications • District & School Level What districts and schools must send out and when (PDF) OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  19. PFE Technical Assistance and Coordination • School Role • District Role Provide coordination, technical assistance, and other support necessary to assist participating schools in the planning and implementing of effective Title I, Part A PFE activities and requirements to improve student academic achievement and school performance. School leadership has a responsibility to: Involve staff in compliance implementation Include staff and parents in the solutions that improve and strengthen family engagement. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  20. PFE Technical Assistance and CoordinationExamples OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  21. Building Capacity • Building Capacity in PFE refers to any effort being made to improve the abilities, skills, and expertise of… Parents and School Staff OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  22. Building Capacity in PFE OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  23. Evaluation of the PFE Program and Activities Districts and schools must conduct an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of their PFE policy and program. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  24. District Level Evaluation of PFE • Tool to Evaluate Your PFE ProgramDistricts have a responsibility to 1) evaluate their PFE policy; and 2) help participating schools create effective PFE programs. • The following inventory tool can help gauge the effectiveness and the scope of PFE efforts. If the inventory reveals that efforts are concentrated at one level of the system or in one focus for engagement, staff will know where to direct additional resources and efforts in their future work. Any planning committee or any group exploring PFE may complete this form. Parents should be represented in whatever process is used. • District Level PFE–Support Inventory Tool OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  25. School Level Evaluation of PFE Efforts • Schools must conduct an annual evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the PFE policy and program. The ultimate goal of this yearly evaluation is to improve the quality of Title I, Part A programs and services. Use the findings from these annual evaluations to develop new strategies able to increase the effectiveness of your PFE policy and program. • Survey with All Sections A–FEnglish | Cambodian | Chinese | Korean | Punjabi | Russian | Somali | Spanish | Tagalog | Vietnamese • Separate sections and other online surveys can be found at School role in Parent and Family Engagement, click on section 7 Evaluate. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  26. School-Parent Compact Dust Off Your Old School-Parent Compact, Your "New" Tool for Linking Family Engagement to Student Learning–Connecticut Department of Education • These video presentations will help district and school staff create a more meaningful grade level, goal oriented school-parent compact that helps children reach the learning goals of state academic standards. • The compact takes the form of a written agreement that identifies specific activities–shared responsibilities–that parents, school staff, and students will carry out to improve academic achievement. The School-Parent Compact must also outline activities that build productive partnership. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  27. What are Strong Family Ties? Title I, Part A students’ reading and math scores (grades 3–5) improved by 40–50 percent when teachers: • met with families face-to-face. • sent materials on ways to help their child at home. • telephoned routinely about progress. (Westat and Policy Studies Associates, 2001) OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  28. Title I, Part A PFE Allowable Funding Activities Compliance, best practices and resources

  29. Parents and Title I, Part A PFE Funding • Parents must be involved in the decision-making process that impacts PFE policy, programs and activities. • Transition year 2016–17 • Title I, Part A allocations of $500,000 or more: • Must reserve at least one percent to fund PFE activities. • Allocate 95 percent (of that one percent) to schools that receive Title I, Part A funds. • Title I, Part A allocations of less than $500,000: • No requirement to reserve a specific amount. • Must implement PFE activities. Requirement for districts with PFE One Percent Set-Aside-Involve parents in the decision making. One way can be through surveys. Include questions that ask parents directly how they would like the district to fund PFE. See a Sample Survey from the Georgia Department of Education. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  30. PFE Allowable Costs Make sure the PFE activities you plan comply with Title I, Part A laws and regulations. The activities allowable under the PFE provisions of Title I, Part A are reasonably broad in scope, but generally linked to education and training, participation in school-related meetings, and inclusion in the education of their children. Compliance is Critical Gifts and Incentives Are Not Allowable. Do not use state or federal funds to pay for gifts/incentives related to parent engagement programs or activities. Title I, Part A Section 1118 of ESEA and WA State Constitution Article 8, Section 5 and 7. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  31. Things to Consider Examples PFE Unallowable Title I, Part A Purchases PFE Allowable Title I, Part A Purchases • Consumables such as paper, glue, scissors for make and take projects that promote academic learning. • Instructional kits, workbooks, reading materials. • Books for loan programs or check out system. • The following items may be donated by others: • Gifts or items that appear to be gifts. • Souvenirs, memorabilia, or promotional items, such as T-shirts, caps, tote bags, imprinted pens, and key chains. • Door prizes, movie tickets, gift certificates, pass to amusement parks, etc. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  32. PFE Allowable Costs–Examples • The activities allowable under the PFE provisions of Title I, Part A are reasonably broad in scope, but generally linked to education and training, participation in school related meetings, and inclusion in the education of their children. • Transportation and child care costs* • Meals/refreshments* • Registration and travel costs* • Translation and interpretation services* • Unavoidable costs related to the facility* Be careful of supplanting! If the district has a district wide initiative to provide any of the service(s) with Basic Ed Funds, then Title I, Part A cannot pay for the expense(s). OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  33. PFE and Rural Education best practices and resources

  34. PFE in Rural Education (R2Ed) • Family Engagement in Rural Education-National Center for Research on Rural Education (R2Ed) • “The importance of family-school partnerships for student success is unequivocal. Given the limited resources evident in many rural communities, family-school partnerships can be especially beneficial for students in rural schools.” • “Decades of research has documented the positive effects of parent participation in children’s academic endeavors for diverse populations (for reviews see Fan & Chen, 2001; Pomerantz, Grolnick, & Price, 2005) and research investigating family-school partnerships specifically in rural communities yields similar results. For example, in a study of high-performing, high-needs rural schools, supportive relationships with families were among the most important factors for rural school success (Barley & Beesley, 2007).” Witte A. L., & Sheridan, S. M. (2011). Family Engagement in Rural Schools (R2Ed Working Paper No. 2011-2). Retrieved from the National Center for Research on Rural Education website: http://r2ed.unl.edu. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  35. Challenges to Family-School Partnerships in Rural Schools • Isolation (Beloin & Peterson, 2000) • Logistical barriers (Weiss & Correa, 1996) • Parent uncertainty and trust (Owens et al., 2007) • Lack of resources and training (Lowe, 2006; McBride et al., 2002; Monk, 2007) Webinar: Family-School Partnerships in Rural Schools: Engaging Families to Promote School Success Webinar for ED Office of School Turnaround/School Support and Rural Programs, May 21, 2012. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  36. PFE in Rural Education–Action Principles ForLocal Educational Agencies (LEA) 1) Include family-school partnership in mission statements. 2) Create paid positions to promote PFE in rural schools. 3) Identify existing human resources such as translators, parent volunteers, and bus drivers. Train them to promote family-school partnerships that engage all families. 4) Provide training to parents on family-school partnerships. 5) Ensure that the practices of specialists, such as school psychologists, counselors, and social workers, engage families in all direct student services. Witte A. L., & Sheridan, S. M. (2011). Family Engagement in Rural Schools (R2Ed Working Paper No. 2011-2). Retrieved from the National Center for Research on Rural Education website: http://r2ed.unl.edu. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  37. PFE in Rural Education–Action Principles ForSchools 1) Set high partnership expectations for all families. Identify and evaluate existing biases, as well as existing partnerships. 2) Establish a “family space” within the school, with resources for families, a schedule of events, and open times for parent-parent and parent-teacher interactions. 3)Establish regular, bidirectional communication mechanisms between home and school, such as two-way home-school notes. 4) Identify ways to extend educational goals through existing events frequented by families, such as athletic events. Eliminate the separation between academics and extracurricular activities. 5) Create a structure for parent-teacher meetings that allows for sharing of information, goals, plans, and solutions for all children, and especially those developing learning or behavioral challenges. Witte A. L., & Sheridan, S. M. (2011). Family Engagement in Rural Schools (R2Ed Working Paper No. 2011-2). Retrieved from the National Center for Research on Rural Education website: http://r2ed.unl.edu. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  38. OSPI Citizen Complaint Procedures Districts and/or schools disseminate adequate information about OSPI’s written complaint procedures for resolving issues of violation(s) of a federal statute or regulation that applies to Title I, Part A programs. This information must reach parents of students, and appropriate private school officials or representatives. Chapter 392-168 WAC, Special Services Programs-Citizen Complaint. Complaints that Allege Discriminationgo to Equity and Civil Rights. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  39. PFE and LAP Compliance, best practices and resources

  40. PFE and LAP • Menu of Best Practices–Family and Community Practices and Strategies • English Language Arts (ELA) • Mathematics • Behavior If the district uses LAP funds for Parent Engagement Practices Report them in the LAP EDS Report-under Services Family and Community Involvement (SY15-16 example below) OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  41. PFE and LAPAllowable Costs LAP is a supplemental program, districts and schools should look at the menu of best practices for guidance on research- based PFE practices. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  42. CPR & PFE Resources

  43. PFE and Consolidated Program Review (CPR) • Documentation is essential for compliance with Title I, Part A regulations and will be evaluated during Consolidated Program Review. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  44. PFE Resources • PFE in Title I, Part A • District Role • School Role • Guides, Tools, Research OSPI Website • You will find resources about: • Communication & Notification • Policy Development • Coordination • Building Capacity • School-Parent Compact • Annual Evaluation • Funding • Allowable Cost • Research OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  45. Family Engagement in EducationHarvard School of Education Institute • “Participants learned effective ways for schools and families to work together to produce the best academic results for students…” Family Engagement in Education OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  46. National Network of Partnership SchoolsJohn Hopkins University • “Schools, districts, state departments of education, and organization/university partners are invited to join NNPS to strengthen and continually improve their programs of school, family, and community partnerships.” National Network of Partnership Schools www.partnershipschools.org OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  47. Spotlight on Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Key changes in section 1010 of ESSA-PFE Beginning in School Year 2017–18

  48. ESSA and PFE Beginning in School Year 2017–18 • The law uses the term “parent and family engagement,” rather than parental involvement. • The district must establish expectations and objectives for meaningful PFE in its policy. • The district must carry out at least one of the following strategies to engage families effectively: PD for school staff, which could include parents; and home-based programs, information dissemination, collaboration with community organizations and other related activities. • Of the one percent of Title I, Part A funds mandated to fund PFE, the school district now must send 90 percent of these funds directly to the school. In ESEA, it was 95 percent. • Schools are permitted to establish a parent advisory board that represents families as staff develop and evaluate school policy. OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  49. Organizing Schools For Improvement • Long-term Study of Chicago Schools • When schools have strong family and community ties, their students are: • Four times more likely to make significant gains in reading. • Ten times more likely to make significant gains in math. Anthony S. Bryk et al, (2010) Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (Chicago: University of Chicago Press). OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

  50. Technical Assistance & Questions • Title I/LAP and CPR Main Line • 360-725-6100 • Title I, Part A/LAP Program Supervisors • Larry Fazzari, 360-725-6189Mary Jo Johnson, 360-725-6103Nate Marciochi 360-725-6172Penelope Mena, 360-725-6069 • LAP Program Supervisors & Menus of Best PracticesJoshua Lynch, Behavior and Research, 360-725-4969 | Readiness To Learn | Student DisciplineAmy Thierry, ELA and Research, 360-725-6026Kristi Coe, Math and Research, 360-725-6190 OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION