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Corridor Management Plan

Corridor Management Plan

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Corridor Management Plan

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  1. Corridor Management Plan Workshop Presentation for Homedale, Owyhee County & Homedale Highway District

  2. Corridor Management Plan Why are we here tonight? • To talk with you about Idaho 19. • To share what we have learned so far. • To hear about your experiences on ID 19 to help identify future improvements - a mostly rural roadway that travels nearly 15.3 miles from the Oregon State Line to Caldwell.

  3. Corridor Management Plan What is a corridor plan? • A near-term (10-year) plan. • Analysis of future travel demand and performance in the corridor. • Evaluation of problems and needs. • Identification of corridor improvement priorities. Our objective is to continue to provide a roadway that is both safe and efficient.

  4. Corridor Management Plan Major Stakeholders • Idaho Transportation Department • Schools, business, major employers • Canyon and Owyhee counties • Caldwell, Greenleaf, Wilder, Homedale • Canyon Highway District No. 4, Golden Gate Highway District and Homedale Highway District

  5. Corridor Management Plan Travel Shed Population Growth

  6. Corridor Management Plan Travel Shed Population (Source: Idaho Economics, 2008)

  7. Corridor Management Plan Transportation Concerns • Right of Way Preservation • Access Management • Confusing Caldwell Terminus • Identification of Highway with Main street (Greenleaf, Wilder, Homedale) • Shoulder Widths / Auxiliary Lanes • Role of Railroad Spur • Pedestrian / Cyclist Safety

  8. Corridor Management Plan Idaho Transportation Department’s Concerns • SAFETY & • EFFICIENCY

  9. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? (Key Problem Areas) • Safety – Vehicle Crashes @ Key Intersections (@ ID 19) • Oregon Line - Johnstone Rd – 16 (scattered) Old Dump IS (clustered) – 10 for total of 26 • Johnstown Rd – Mainstreet 12 (scattered) -14 (scattered @ IS; @ 3rd IS) • Wilder – 8 (U.S. 95 6) • Travis – 1 • Greenleaf – 13 (Friends 3) • Notus – Weitz 12 • Simplot Gate District – 19 + • Farmway Road – 14 + • Centennial Way & Paynter– 30 + (Source: ITD - 5 year period)

  10. Corridor Management Plan Crash Cluster from Oregon Line to Johnstone St. (W. Idaho), Homedale

  11. Corridor Management Plan Crash Cluster for Idaho Street for Homedale, ID

  12. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? (Key Problem Areas) ID 19 Inter- Section With US 95 & Mercer Dr. (Concentrated Crash Locations)

  13. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? (Key Problem Areas) Peckham Road

  14. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? (Key Problem Areas) Greenleaf “Main Street” (Concentrated Crash Locations)

  15. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? (Key Problem Areas) Simplot Gateway District

  16. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? (Key Problem Areas) ID 19 Industrial / Commercial District in W. Caldwell

  17. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? (Key Problem Areas) Centennial Way / Paynter / Downtown Couplet And Main St.

  18. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? Crash Concerns - Oregon Line to US 95 Average Rate** • Mile Posts: 0.0 -3.98 – Oregon Line to Johnstone Rd Crash Rate - 3.72 Above Statewide Average of 1.48 • Miles Posts: 3.98 - 4.56 – Johnstone Rd to 3rd St. West Crash Rate - 6.14 Above Statewide Average of 1.02 • Mile Posts: 4.56 – 34.63 – 3rd St. West to US 95 Crash Rates*** – 0.97, 0.73, & 0.53 Above Statewide Averages of 0.43 & 0.53  *Note: Accident rates are average annual, based on the most recent 5 year period. **Comparison to “Average” is based on comparable highways (2 lane widths) serving rural communities. ***Based on 3 segment codes – ALL OVER THE STATE-WIDE AVERAGE

  19. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? Commercial Vehicle Traffic • Oregon Line to Johnstone Rd – 62 vehicles / day • Johnstone Rd – 3rd Street – 62 vehicles / day • 3rd Street to Main – 140 vehicles / day • Main to 2nd Street E. – 168 vehicles / day • 2nd Street E. to U.S. 95 – 174 vehicles / day 1.2% Average Daily Commercial Traffic Between Oregon Line and U.S. 95 Jct

  20. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? Commercial Vehicle Traffic • Commercial traffic peaks at 690 average daily traffic in September or… 8.49% Average Daily Traffic At Caldwell

  21. Corridor Management PlanKey Problem Areas Traffic Volume – ADT(Average Daily Traffic)

  22. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? – Road Capacity • Bottlenecks Result in Congestion • …a reduction in Level of Service (LOS)

  23. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW?–Road Capacity • Bottlenecks Result in Congestion • …a reduction in Level of Service (LOS)

  24. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? – Road Capacity • Bottlenecks Result in Congestion • …a reduction in Level of Service (LOS)

  25. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? – Road CapacityBottlenecks Result in Congestion • …a reduction in Level of Service (LOS)

  26. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? – Road Capacity • Bottlenecks Result in Congestion • …a reduction in Level of Service (LOS)

  27. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? – Road Capacity • Bottlenecks Result in Congestion • …a reduction in Level of Service (LOS)

  28. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? Roadway Capacity • For most segments (including three and two lane sections) we are well under capacity of the roadway today (when we compare current volumes to existing capacity) but ID 19 users will experience a decline in level of service (LOS) after 15 years.

  29. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? Speed Concerns • Speed studies show we drive an average of 10% over the posted limits, however... Average speed is just above the posted limit (60 mph)

  30. Corridor Management Plan WHERE WILL WE BE TOMORROW? Why is Access Management Important to ID 19 Users? • Improve safety. • Maintain a functional highway – efficiently move traffic to and through your communities. • Safe and functional highways is one more reason why the ID 19 travel shed should continue to be a good place to live and do business. • Planning can help to balance public and private interest.

  31. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? Access Points Per Mile • Nationwide and Statewide Studies Reveal… • An increase of 10 – 20 access points per mile on major arterials increases crash rate by 30%. • Idaho Statewide data indicate that 37% of all crashes occur at intersections, driveways and alleys. • Well managed arterials have 40% - 50% fewer crashes.

  32. Corridor Management Plan WHERE ARE WE TODAY? - Access Points Per Mile

  33. Corridor Management Plan Why is Access Management Important to Idaho Transportation Department? • Our Mission: Your mobility. • To maintain a efficient high speed linkages from Activity Centers in Canyon & Owyhee Counties to other places within Idaho. • To improve safety – remove unsafe features or add features which will improve both safety and functionality of Idaho 19. • Both of these can be more affordable with careful access management.

  34. Corridor Management Plan NOW A WORD FROM OUR SPONSOR… Funding Challenge: Idaho’s state and local transportation agencies need an additional $240 million each year to meet our increasing transportation needs. Without the revenue increase, we will not have the funds needed to: • Improve highway safety • Maintain or improve highway efficiency • Match federal highway funds

  35. Corridor Management Plan NOW A WORD FROM OUR SPONSOR… Funding challenge: • Idaho is the 4th-fastest growing state in the nation. • Idaho’s population is expected to increase by 35% between 2000 and 2020, nearly twice the national average growth rate. • That means more cars, trucks and drivers – and more demand for better roads and bridges.

  36. Corridor Management Plan NOW A WORD FROM OUR SPONSOR… Funding challenge: State revenue is not keeping pace: • Idaho’s fuel tax has not increased since 1996. • Statewide vehicle registration fees have not increased since 1997. • Highway construction & maintenance materials costs are soaring.

  37. Corridor Management Plan Stay Tuned and Involved: • For information, visit itd.idaho.gov, go to Projects, Southwest Idaho, Idaho 19 Corridor Study. • Questions, comments or suggestions: comments@itd.idaho.gov • For more information, call ITD Office of Communications at 334-8005.

  38. Corridor Management Plan What’s Next… • BASED ON YOUR FEEDBACK… • Narrow the list of the needed improvements. • Bring policy and physical improvements to local stakeholders’ Task Force for plan review. • Take recommended plan elements to: • Local Planning and Zoning Commissions • Local Government (County, Highway District, Cities) • Idaho Transportation Board (ITD)

  39. Corridor Management Plan Thank you for attending • ITD appreciates your comments and will consider them in the draft corridor plan. • Please take time to examine the exhibits and discuss your concerns with us… and • Take the time to mark-up the map of the Idaho 19 Canyon County area