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METONYMY PowerPoint Presentation

METONYMY

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METONYMY

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  1. FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE REVIEW Interactive Quiz created by Nancy Roberts Garrity at St. John Fisher School PUN METONYMY SYNECDOCHE “A dog not only has a fur coat, but also pants.” “Busy hands worked in the kitchen.” “The pen is mightier than the sword.” NOTE: In order to play this game, it must be viewed in slide show (F5)

  2. FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE REVIEW compiled by Nancy Roberts Garrity Figurative languageis writing or speech not intended to be taken literally. Some commonly used figures of speech are pun, synecdoche, and metonymy. You will see examples of these in this exercise. A pun is using a word or words that have more than one meaning. It is sometimes called “a play on words.” Some examples are: “A bicycle can’t stand alone because it is two-tired” and “A chicken crossing a road is poultry in motion.” Asynecdoche is a unique type of metaphor that uses a part to represent or suggest the whole. For example in “Our class brain always has all the correct answers,” we identify the smartest student in the class by using the word brain. This is a synecdoche because “brain” represents a part of the whole person. Ametonymyis a unique type of metaphor in which something is named that replaces something closely related to it. In metonymy, one thing is said when another thing is meant. For example in “Let’s take this problem to City Hall,” City Hall refers to the people in the local city government rather than the building itself.

  3. Our social studies teacher said that his globe means the world to him. pun synecdoche metonymy

  4. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  5. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  6. Immediately after the robbery, thelaw arrived at the scene of the crime. pun synecdoche metonymy

  7. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  8. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  9. In came Mrs. Fezziwig, one vast, substantial smile. metonymy pun synecdoche

  10. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  11. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  12. Let’s buy one hundred head of cattle. metonymy synecdoche pun

  13. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  14. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  15. A watched pot never boils. metonymy synecdoche pun

  16. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  17. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  18. Sir Lancelot once had a very bad dream about his horse. It was a knight mare. pun synecdoche metonymy

  19. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  20. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  21. The soldiers displayed much loyalty to our stars and stripes. pun synecdoche metonymy

  22. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  23. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  24. Busy hands worked in the office. synecdoche pun metonymy

  25. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  26. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  27. The principle part of a horse is the mane, of course. metonymy pun synecdoche

  28. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  29. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  30. The room was filled with smiling faces. pun metonymy synecdoche

  31. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  32. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  33. He said that he was working hard, but he was hardly working. pun metonymy synecdoche

  34. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  35. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  36. The White House announced that the president would soon visit Japan. synecdoche metonymy pun

  37. OH NO! . . . TRY AGAIN!

  38. GREAT JOB!! KEEP MOOVING!

  39. FANTASTIC JOB!! YOU'RE FINISHED!