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DHS

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DHS

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  1. DHS Graphic Design Typography

  2. Type Alignment • There are 5 types of type alignments: • Center • Left aligned • Right aligned • Justified • Or wrapped around other visual elements

  3. Centered aligned type • It is popular for short amount of text : • Flyers • Wedding invitation & announcement • Dasdfsafsafds • Dagdsgfsdgfsda • Sdfsadafdsfsda agfadsgfv

  4. Left aligned type • It is useful in just about any type application because designers consider it is easy to read. • Shdhabsjdasdada • Sdasdasdasdasdasd cdvsds • asdsadasdasdas

  5. Justified text • It is common in magazines and newspapers. • It aligns text to both the left and right margins, adding extra space between words as necessary

  6. Right aligned text • It is used more in moderation because the irregular left edge makes it slightly harder for the viewer’s eye to track to the beginning of the next line.

  7. Runaround text

  8. Runaround text • It is a natural for newsletters and magazines. • It flows easily around objects on the page such as • initial caps, • illustrations, • photographs, and even • other pieces of text.

  9. Line length • Meaning: how long the text line of the paragraph • It is an important component of designing readable text. • Long lines of type are hard to read because the eye has difficulty tracking back to the beginning of the next line.

  10. Line length • Really short lines of type are tedious to read, especially if there are a lot of hyphenated words. • The shorter the line length, the fewer characters fit on the line, and the more hyphenated words result.

  11. Short line length • Results in bad breaks and undesirable amounts of hyphenation (more than 2 hyphens in a row are undesirable).

  12. Best legibility?! • For best legibility, line lengths should be no more than approximately 50 to 60 characters long.

  13. Catagories of typeface • We divide the structure of typefaces into 5 catagories • Serif • Sans serif • Square serif • Script • decorative

  14. serif • Old style, transitional, and modern serifs • Roman serif type originated with the Romans

  15. stonemasons

  16. serif

  17. serif

  18. serif • Old style • Transitional • Modern serif • They are extremely easy to read in both headlines and body copy • They convey a sense of dignity, history and reserved style

  19. Samples of serif • Caslon

  20. Sample of serif • Tiffany-heavy-bold

  21. Square serif • The serifs at the end of the letter strokes appear to end in blocks or slabs • The x-height is very tall compared to the capitals, • There is very little contrast between the thick and thin of the letter strokes.

  22. Square serif • Some typographers name this category “Egyptian” or “Slab Serif” because many of these typefaces had Egyptian sounding names to capatalize on the fad popularity of anything Egyptian in the early 1800s.

  23. Square serif • When set into the body copy, they appear very dense and black. • They are mostly used in children’s books because of their simplicity and unfussy clean appearance.

  24. Samples of square serif/ egyptian

  25. Samples of square serif • Lubalin Graph

  26. Lubalin Graph

  27. Samples of square serif • Clarendon

  28. Samples of square serif • Clarendon

  29. Sans serif • “sans” means without in french • “sans serif” means without serifs • It originated as a visual response to the Industrial Revolution

  30. Sans serif • Because of their simplicity and clean look, work well for headline type and display type. • But if set for body, it would slow down readers’ reading speed.

  31. Serif vs sans serif • Serif helps reader identify the letterforms faster than a sans serif font. • Without the serifs, there are slightly fewer characteristics for the readers to identify  slow down reading speed.

  32. Samples of sans serif • Helvetica

  33. Samples of sans serif • Futura

  34. Samples of sans serif • Gill Sans

  35. Script • Script typefaces convey the feeling of handwritten designs. • Depending on the design of the script, the typeface can seem • formal or • very informal.

  36. script • Formal appearing scripts are commonly used in wedding invitation • Informal appearing scripts can lead an air of immediacy and dynamic action to a design.

  37. Script • Many script typefaces are hard to read when set in blocks of text or in all capital letters. • Some are difficult to read when set in all lower case. • Good for headline, avoid in body copy

  38. Samples of scripts • hancock

  39. Samples of script • Vladimir

  40. Samples of script • nelson

  41. decorative • These typeface designs that are hard to categorize are by default dropped into the decorative category. • There are no particular design limits for this category. • Many of these typefaces are extremely difficult to read and are best used for display or headlines, no body copy

  42. samples • tinsnips

  43. samples • tolo

  44. samples • Transuranium

  45. samples • TSA

  46. Quiz on identifying type catagories

  47. QUIZ • Serif • Sans serif • Square serif • Script • decorative

  48. Serif