Download
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
consider: PowerPoint Presentation

consider:

57 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

consider:

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. consider: How superficial* is the average American? superficial* = only worried about outward appearance Without knowing anything about either candidate, which of these two men do you think the average American would vote for to be President?

  2. consider: How much do you think the average American trusts the government to solve problems in the U.S.? Why? gov’t

  3. essential question: How did politics change in the 60s and 70s? • Image becomes increasingly important from the 1960 Presidential election. • Hope in government’s ability to solve problems turns into distrust.

  4. 1. Image becomes increasingly important from the 1960 Presidential election. 1960 election • JFK (young, Catholic) vs. Nixon (Ike’s VP)

  5. first televised debate (viewers say JFK wins; radio listeners say Nixon) 1960 debate (start at 5:00) Who do you think won the part of the debate shown?

  6. JFK wins in very close election

  7. 2. Hope in government’s ability to solve problems turns into distrust. John F. Kennedy (1961-63) • New Frontier = JFK’s agenda that shows optimism of time • inaugural address: “My fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.”

  8. hope seen in civil rights promises (many fulfilled) and eventual Cold War cool down after the Cuban Missile Crisis

  9. hope seen in promise to win space race; pledges to put man on moon by end of decade and succeeds with 1969 moon landing tv coverage of moon landing

  10. hope seen in efforts to improve U.S. image around the world with Peace Corps

  11. distrust seen in assassination of JFK; Warren Commission says lone gunman, but many suspect conspiracy

  12. distrust seen in assassination of JFK; Warren Commission says lone gunman, but many suspect conspiracy

  13. 2. Hope in government’s ability to solve problems turns into distrust. Lyndon Johnson (1963-69) • Great Society = LBJ’s agenda that shows continued optimism in the 60s

  14. hope seen in Great Society’s War on Poverty—Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for fair and accessible housing

  15. hope seen in Great Society’s War on Poverty—Head Start provides education at a younger age for children of low-income families

  16. hope seen in Great Society’s War on Poverty—Medicaid to provide health insurance for low-income people Both established in 1965, Medicaid is for low-income and Medicare primarily for the elderly.

  17. distrust seen in growing involvement in Vietnam

  18. 2. Hope in government’s ability to solve problems turns into distrust. Richard Nixon (1969-1974) • hope seen in detente (meetings and treaties improving U.S.-Soviet relations)

  19. 2. Hope in government’s ability to solve problems turns into distrust. Richard Nixon (1969-1974) • hope seen in detente (meetings and treaties improving U.S.-Soviet relations) Nixon and Mao Ze Dong (left); at Great Wall with wife Pat (above)

  20. distrust seen in continued involvement in Vietnam and government misinformation

  21. distrust seen in Watergate (scandal involving Nixon’s attempt to cover up burglary of the Democratic party offices to help win the 1972 election) I’m not a crook!

  22. distrust seen in Watergate • Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein were reporters that uncovered connections between high-ranking government officials and the burglars

  23. distrust seen in Watergate • United States v. Nixon was the court case that forced Nixon to give up his secret tapes of his White House conversations

  24. distrust seen in Watergate • Nixon ultimately resigns instead of facing impeachment and removal

  25. Do you think an ugly person could beat a good-looking person for the Presidency today? What event of the 60s and early 70s do you think would have inspired you the most of the government’s ability to solve problems? Do you think you would have lost trust in the government’s ability to solve problems in society? If so, when?

  26. 60s to early 70s politics b-ball review rules: • each team picks a team name and must have 3-4 members • a question will be asked and a name picked to answer the question from the Bucket of Equality You • that person must answer the question correctly (the team can help) • if wrong, another name is pulled; if right, that person shoots for 1, 2, or 3 points (no jumping) EOC • team with most points wins