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  1. consider: How might the common person think differently than someone who is rich and “well-born?” What might the common white male, perhaps one that does not own land, want in the first half of the 1800s? I view the world as… I view the world as… rich and “well-born” person common person

  2. essential question: How did the Age of Jackson change America?

  3. The United States would change forever, becoming more like it is today during the… Age of Jackson • 1820s and 1830s • more power to the common man • states end the property requirement to vote • common men would then vote for Jackson because he grew up as a common man • more power to the President

  4. Consider the two graphs above to answer the following: How much did white male voting change in the 1820s? How does the percentage of eligible voters today compare to the Age of Jackson?

  5. Even with the support of the common man, getting elected President was not easy for Andrew Jackson. When he ran in 1824, he was stopped by the… “corrupt bargain”

  6. Even with the support of the common man, getting elected President was not easy for Andrew Jackson. When he ran in 1824, he was stopped by the… “corrupt bargain” I’ll get you, Republicans!

  7. Define “corrupt bargain” in your own words. You should have something like: Henry Clay got Quincy Adams elected President in the House in exchange for a position as Secretary of State. I’ll get you, Republicans!

  8. Jackson’s anger over Clay and others’ turning against him leads him to split the Republican party by forming his own party, the… Jacksonian Democrats

  9. Jackson’s anger over Clay and others’ turning against him leads him to split the Republican party by forming his own party, the… Jacksonian Democrats Booo!!! You’re worse than your father was at being President! The Jacksonian Democrats were helped by the fact that John Quincy Adams did not do well as President from 1825-1829.

  10. In 1828, Jackson won the Presidential election as more common men were able to vote. One permanent change in our nation’s politics involved how campaigns were conducted. The common man would often only get information from… mudslinging

  11. In 1828, Jackson won the Presidential election as more common men were able to vote. One permanent change in our nation’s politics involved how campaigns were conducted. The common man would often only get information from… mudslinging The Constitution permits each state legislature to choose the method of electing presidential electors for its state. In 1800 the legislatures in most states appointed the electors. By 1824 most states had adopted more democratic systems in which electors pledged to specific presidential candidates were selected by popular vote in statewide elections.

  12. In 1828, Jackson won the Presidential election as more common men were able to vote. One permanent change in our nation’s politics involved how campaigns were conducted. The common man would often only get information from… mudslinging Republican for life! vs. I’m a Democrat now!

  13. In 1828, Jackson won the Presidential election as more common men were able to vote. One permanent change in our nation’s politics involved how campaigns were conducted. The common man would often only get information from… mudslinging Your mother is a covent garden nun*! a political cartoon depicting the mudslinging of the 1828 campaign *A covent garden nun was slang for a prostitute.

  14. In 1828, Jackson won the Presidential election as more common men were able to vote. One permanent change in our nation’s politics involved how campaigns were conducted. The common man would often only get information from… mudslinging

  15. Read over the article about the mudslinging that occurred in the presidential campaign of 1828 if you have not yet done so. Then, create a mudslinging campaign poster of your own. Be sure to include to picture for those that are illiterate.

  16. We will be practicing writing in our own words and considering perspective while looking at Jacksonian political reform. Answer the question below in your own words. Consider using any of the terms suggested. The more terms are used, the more likely you have a thorough answer. Then, draw facial expressions and speech bubbles to show the common man’s and rich and well-born man’s perspective on Jackson’s rise to power. How did Andrew Jackson go from the frontier to the White House? possible terms to use in your answer: Battle of New Orleans, common man, “corrupt bargain,” election of 1824, Democratic Party (a.k.a. Jacksonian Democrats), and election of 1828

  17. Example of a answer about Jackson’s road from the frontier to the White House (remember to use your own words). Jackson went from being born on the frontier to the White House. He became famous by winning the Battle of New Orleans. He was especially popular with the common man. He lost the election of 1824 due to what he called a “corrupt bargain.” As a result, Jackson formed the Democratic Party and won the election of 1828.

  18. I hate Jackson because my interests were represented until he became President. I love Jackson because he doesn’t trust the rich, just like me!!!

  19. How did Jackson’s spoils system change the way government works? spoils system = giving your political allies appointments when you are elected Although this cartoon was published by Thomas Nast in 1877 to ridicule the political corruption of that day, Jackson was credited with inventing the "spoils" system of giving the victors in an election the rewards of making job appointments.

  20. How might Andrew Jackson and the common man be responsible for these license plates?

  21. How did Jackson’s Indian Policy show increased influence of the common man? How does Jackson’s Indian policy explain the current situation of Native Americans? “five civilized tribes” = those adopting some white culture to keep land Write the definition of the terms for a reference when you answer the questions in your own words. 1- Seminole 2- Creek 3- Choctaw 4- Chickasaw 5- Cherokee

  22. Sequoyah = creates Cherokee alphabet (example of “being civilized”) Sequoyah, a Cherokee scholar, developed a written table of syllables for the Cherokee language that enabled his people to publish a tribal newspaper in both Cherokee and English.

  23. Indian Removal Act of 1830= government funding treaties to move Natives west (Jackson prefers force)

  24. Worcester v. Georgia = John Marshall says Native land rights have to be recognized; Jackson refuses to enforce

  25. Worcester v. Georgia = John Marshall says Native land rights have to be recognized; Jackson refuses to enforce John Marshall made his decision; now let him enforce it!

  26. Trail of Tears = removal of Cherokees to Oklahoma (many died)

  27. Trail of Tears = removal of Cherokees to Oklahoma (many died)

  28. How did Jackson’s Indian Policy show increased influence of the common man and the President? How does Jackson’s Indian policy explain the current situation of Native Americans? possible terms to use in your answers: “five civilized tribes,” Sequoyah, Indian Removal Act, Worcester v. Georgia, Trail of Tears link to “Indian Reservation”

  29. How does the Nullification Crisis prove Jackson to be a powerful President? Tariff of Abominations = 1828 tariff that caused high prices; angered the South How am I supposed to make money growing cotton with such expensive manufactured goods?!?!

  30. South Carolina Exposition= in reaction to the tariff, John C. Calhoun (V.P. at time, from S.C.) secretly published this to support nullification based on states’ rights States rights! Nullification! States rights! Nullification!

  31. Nullification Crisis= standoff between S.C. and Jackson; S.C. refuses to collect tariff and Jackson threatens force; a lower tariff ends crisis (for now…) I’ll force you to collect the tariff! I propose a tariff bill that will lower the tariff and end this crisis! We nullify the tariff! States’ rights forever!

  32. How does the Nullification Crisis prove Jackson to be a powerful President? possible terms to use in your answer: Tariff of Abominations, South Carolina Exposition, nullification, states’ rights, Nullification Crisis

  33. How did Jackson again show a new, stronger President in the bank war? bank war = Jackson’s attempt to kill the 2nd Bank of the U.S.; begins with his vetoing the recharter of the bank Democratic cartoon shows Jackson fighting the monster Bank. "The Bank," Jackson told Martin Van Buren, "is trying to kill me, but I will kill it!"

  34. bank war = Jackson’s attempt to kill the 2nd Bank of the U.S.; begins with his vetoing the recharter of the bank

  35. election of 1832 = Jackson wins over Henry Clay, ending the Republican Party; seen as support for his veto of bank

  36. pet banks = where Jackson put the 2nd B.U.S.’s money to officially kill the national bank It is ironic that Jackson is now on federal money because he killed the national bank responsible for a common currency.

  37. How did Jackson again show a new, stronger President in the bank war? possible terms to use in your answer: bank war, election of 1832, and pet banks

  38. Let’s quiz each other on these terms related to the Age of Jackson. Give a description of a term and to let the person guess the term. B’s guess first. Remember to give up to two clues and to repeat if you don’t get the term. • terms: • Battle of New Orleans • common man • “corrupt bargain” • Jacksonian Democrats • election of 1828 • mudslinging • spoils system • “five civilized tribes” • Sequoyah • Indian Removal Act • Worcester v. Georgia • Trail of Tears • Tariff of Abominations • South Carolina Exposition • Nullification Crisis • bank war • pet banks

  39. Did the Age of Jackson change America for the better or for the worse? Which perspective do you think is most accurate?