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Thank You for Arguing: Chapter 8 Summary PowerPoint Presentation
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Thank You for Arguing: Chapter 8 Summary

Thank You for Arguing: Chapter 8 Summary

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Thank You for Arguing: Chapter 8 Summary

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    1. Thank You for Arguing: Chapter 8 Summary No annoying paperclips needed!

    2. Main points This chapter explained how to use ethos, argument by character or disinterested goodwill as Aristotle called it, which is the appearance of having only the best interest of you audience at heart-even to the point of sacrificing for the good of others. Focused on Lincolns Gambit, the author, Jay Heinrichs, talks about how Lincoln won the trust of the audience. He used the best trick of all: Make it seem you have no tricks. Starting out by telling the audience they would hear nothing new, he lowered their expectations and caused them to misunderestimate him. He also won the sympathy vote by starting out slow, seeming weak, and gradually getting smoother as he went, which largely contradicted his freakishly tall, ragged appearance.

    3. Example Candidates for the sympathy vote: Colby and Matt Colby seems more buff and strong, Matt not so much Matt wins, right? Wrong! Colby starts off speaking slow and hesitant, as if not confident in himself but gradually gets smoother and more confident in himself, Matt comes of strong/bold maybe a bit too cocky Colby wins The point: a knowledgeable audience tends to sympathize with a clumsy speaker and even mentally argue his point for him (pg 76)

    4. The Basics Reluctant Conclusion: Act as if you reached your conclusion only because of its overwhelming rightness. (pg 78) Agree ? Fact comes up ? Disagree Personal sacrifice: show that you suffer from the decision, for the audiences best interest. Dubitatio: show doubt in yourself. The plainspoken, seemingly ingenious speaker is the trickiest of them all, being most believable. (pg 78)