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  1. * 100 100 100 100 100 200 200 200 200 200 300 300 300 300 300 400 400 400 400 400 500 500 500 500 500 600 600 600 600 600 700 700 700 700 700 800 800 800 800 800 900 900 900 900 900 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000

  2. Chapter 11 The North (1790-1860)

  3. Chapter 11 Key Terms and People

  4. 100 Answer Based on water-powered textile mills that employed young, unmarried women from local farms. The system included a loom that could both spin thread and weave cloth in the same mill. Boardinghouses were constructed for the women. Boardinghouse residents were given a room and meals along with their jobs. Girls worked up to 14 hours a day and earned between $2-$4 each week. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  5. 200 Answer A period of rapid growth in the speed and convenience of travel because of new methods of transportation. By the mid-1800s, hundreds of these traveled up and down American rivers. These new boats enabled Americans to ship more goods farther, faster, and for less money than ever before. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  6. 300 Answer In 1832 Samuel F. B. Morse perfected this device. It could send information over wires across great distances. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  7. 400 Answer Due to a labor shortage, entire families were hired to work at the mills. Children as well as adults worked in the mills. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  8. 500 Answer In 1769 Englishman Richard Arkwright invented a large spinning machine called a water frame. The water frame could produce dozens of cotton threads at the same time. It lowered the cost of cotton cloth and increased the speed of textile production. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  9. 600 Answer Boiling water produces steam, which pushes pistons back and forth in a steam engine. These pistons are connected to rods that rotate the wheels of the locomotive. The train connected every major city in the eastern United States by 1860. Railroad companies became some of the most powerful businesses in the United States. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  10. 700 Answer The United States already had about 9,000 miles of railroad track. Timber was needed for railroad ties, cars, and bridges and as fuel for steam locomotives. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  11. 800 Answer This allowed manufacturers to efficiently create more goods for the marketplace. It required the use of interchangeable parts, machine tools, and the division of labor. The idea of interchangeable parts was developed by Eli Whitney. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  12. 900 Answer They wanted the chance to earn money instead of working on the family farm. The pay was better than the farm. However, they worked in unhealthy conditions such as dirty air and loud machines. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  13. 1000 Answer A period of rapid growth in using machines for manufacturing and production that began in the mid-1700’s. Industrial Revolution in mid 1700’s 7. Transportation Revolution Textile Mill and Water Frame & Steamboats Elements of Mass Production 8. The Steam Train Mills Change Workers’ Lives 9. Transportation Routes, 1850 Lowell System 10. Telegraph Life of a Mill Girl

  14. Chapter 12 The South (1790-1860)

  15. Chapter 12 Key Terms and People

  16. 100 Answer Eli Whitney’s revolutionary machine enabled workers to easily remove seeds from cotton fibers. The result was a dramatic increase in cotton production in the South. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  17. 200 Answer The most violent slave revolt in the United States occurred in 1831. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  18. 300 Answer In 1860 about 1 out of 50 African Americans in the South was free. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  19. 400 Answer Slaveholders’ children were often cared for by enslaved women. At the time, women who looked after children were called nurses. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  20. 500 Answer It had many fields as well as many buildings where different work was done. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  21. 600 Answer Production increased rapidly—from about 2 million pounds in 1791 to roughly a billion pounds by 1860. As early as 1840, the United States was producing more than half of the cotton grown in the entire world. The economic boom attracted new settlers, built up wealth among wealthy white southerners, and helped keep in place the institution of slavery in the South. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  22. 700 Answer Enslaved African Americans did most of the planting, harvesting, and processing of cotton. From southern ports, sailing ships carried the cotton to distant textile mills. Cotton was shipped on river steamboats to major ports such as Charleston. A large amount of cotton was sold to textile mills in the northeastern United States. Textile mills in Great Britain were the largest foreign buyers of southern cotton. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  23. 800 Answer They lived on land that could not grow cash crops. They survived by hunting, fishing, raising small gardens, and doing odd jobs for money. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  24. 900 Answer “The oldest inhabitants of our county have never experienced such a distressing [terrible] time, as we have had since Sunday night last. Annotation The [slaves], about fifteen miles from this place, have massacred from 50 to 75 women and children, and some 8 or 10 men. Every house, room and corner in this place is full of women and children, driven from home, who had to take to the woods, until they could get to this place. Annotation We are worn out with fatigue [tiredness].” Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  25. 1000 Answer The lives of slaves revolved around the work that was required of them. For many, this meant doing the backbreaking work of harvesting and loading tons of cotton. Most slaves found hope and a short escape from their daily misery in Sunday church services. Others sought to escape permanently and ran away, hoping to reach the freedom of the North. A failed escape attempt, however, could result in a cruel whipping—or worse. Cotton Gin 7. Slaves and Work “A The Cotton Kingdom “Cotton is King” Nurse’s Work” The South’s Cotton Economy 8. A Slave’s Daily Life A Southern Plantation 9. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Yeomen and Poor Whites 10. Nat Turner’s Rebellion Free African Americans in the South (Letter)

  26. Chapter 13 New Movements in America (1815-1850)

  27. Chapter 13 Key Terms and People

  28. 100 Answer They formed statewide groups opposing the suffrage movement during the late 1800s. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  29. 200 Answer The organization was not an actual railroad but was a network of people who arranged transportation and hiding places for fugitives, or escaped slaves. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  30. 300 Answer Some New England writers and philosophers found spiritual wisdom in a certain belief, the belief that people could or rise above, material things in life. They also believed that people should depend on themselves and their own insights, rather than on outside authorities. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  31. 400 Answer This city lured thousands of people in search of jobs and a better life. Many city dwellers found life difficult in the crowded urban conditions. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  32. 500 Answer In 1837 Mann became Massachusetts’s first secretary of education. He convinced the state to double its school budget and raise teachers’ salaries. He lengthened the school year and began the first school for teacher training. Mann’s success set a standard for education reform throughout the country. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  33. 600 Answer These were people who were against slavery, antislavery reformers. Sojourner Truth was a former slave who became a leading ________________. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  34. 700 Answer These movements in America included religious meetings called revivals, where preachers urged huge crowds of people to seek salvation. One movement tried to convince people to avoid drinking alcohol. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  35. 800 Answer In the mid-1800s, large numbers of immigrants crossed the Atlantic Ocean to begin new lives in the United States. More than 4 million of them settled in the United States between 1840 and 1860, most from Europe. More than 3 million of these immigrants arrived from Ireland and Germany. Many of them were fleeing economic or political troubles in their native countries. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  36. 900 Answer Hudson River school painters focused on nature being the center of importance in artwork. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  37. 1000 Answer William Lloyd Garrison published an abolitionist newspaper, the Liberator, beginning in 1831. In 1833 Garrison also helped found a new society. Some members wanted immediate emancipation and racial equality for African Americans. Garrison later became its president. Push-Pull Factors of Immigration 7. American Anti-Slavery New York City, mid 1800’s Society Transcendentalists, Henry David 8. The Underground Railroad Thoreau 9. Abolitionist Art of the Romantic Movement 10. Women’s Voting Rights Reform Movements 11. The Antisuffragists Improvements in Education

  38. Chapter 14 A Divided Nation (1848-1860)

  39. Chapter 14 Key Terms and People

  40. 100 Answer 1. California would enter the Union as a free state. 2. The rest of the Mexican Cession would be federal land. In this territory, popular sovereignty would decide on slavery. 3. Texas would give up land east of the upper Rio Grande. In return, the government would pay Texas’s debts from when it was an independent republic. 4. The slave trade—but not slavery—would end in the nation’s capital. 5. A more effective fugitive slave law would be passed. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  41. 200 Answer Preston Brooks beat Charles Sumner with his cane. Sumner’s only protection is a quill pen symbolically representing the law. Sumner was against slavery while Preston was for slavery. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  42. 300 Answer The Missouri Compromise, 1820 Under the Missouri Compromise of 1820, there are an equal number of free states (orange) and slave states (green). The Compromise of 1850 The Compromise of 1850 allowed for one more free state than slave state, but also passed a strict fugitive slave law. The Kansas-Nebraska Act As a result of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the question of slavery is to be decided by popular sovereignty—by the people who vote in the elections there—in the newly organized territories of Kansas and Nebraska. The act sparked violent conflict between pro-slavery and antislavery groups. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  43. 400 Answer In 1858 Abraham Lincoln gave a passionate speech to Illinois Republicans about the dangers of the disagreement over slavery. Some considered it a call for war. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  44. 500 Answer Made it a crime to help runaway slaves and allowed officials to arrest those slaves in free areas. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  45. 600 Answer Favoring the interests of one section or region over the interests of the entire country. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  46. 700 Answer Due to Lincoln’s presidential election in 1860 and his views regarding not to expand slavery anymore, angered the South and lead to secession. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  47. 800 Answer This was seen as a setback to abolitionist ideas against slavery. It reduced the status of free African Americans and upheld the view of slaves as property without rights or protection under the Constitution. It also took from Congress the power to ban slavery in its territories, which would aid the spread of slavery in new states. Because of its pro-slavery decision, the reputation of the Court suffered greatly in parts of the North. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  48. 900 Answer Lincoln ran for the U.S. Senate in Illinois against Douglas in 1858. The two men debated seven times at various locations around the state. Lincoln lost the election but gained national recognition. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  49. 1000 Answer Lincoln wins with his Republican Party. Sectionalism 7. Dred Scott v. Sanford Compromise of 1850 8. A Growing Conflict Fugitive Slave Act 9. A House Divided Election of 1852 10. Lincoln-Douglas Debates From Compromise to Conflict 11. Election of 1860 Brooks Attacks Sumner 12. The South Secedes, Rebel Govt.

  50. Chapter 15 The Civil War (1861-1865)