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  1. YJB TOOLKITS: YOT structure review context presentationYJB owner: Neil BowerDirectorate: Performance May 2011Version 0.1 (QA LHM)

  2. Objectives: • At the end of the workshop we will have… • Reviewed our current structure and the case for change • Agreed any required structural changes for consultation • Considered Organisation Structures • Addressed Culture Change • Explored a Communication Strategy

  3. How? • Why re-structure? • Purpose & core functions • YOT vision & mission • Review • Design • Test • Selection • Next steps

  4. Exercise – Purpose 1/3 • What is the purpose of ??? YOT (i.e. what is it for)? • PART 1 - On your own you have 5 minutes to come up with as many reasons as possible for the purpose of ??? YOT • Using the post-it notes on your table, please only record 1 reason on 1 post-it note

  5. Exercise – Purpose 2/3 • Part 2 - You now have 10 minutes to share your reasons with the group • Please theme your reasons into categories by placing like reasons together onto a flip chart • Part 3 - You now have 2 minutes to present your categories to the main group

  6. Exercise – Purpose 3/3 • Using the single Red / Amber / Green sticky dots on your tables, can you please rate the categories in level of priority as follows: • Red = 1st highest priority • Amber = 2nd highest priority • Green = 3rd highest priority

  7. Key Questions to aid your structure review What is your Mission Statement? What is your Vision? What are the YOT’s objectives? What activities must be carried out to achieve these results? What results are needed to achieve these objectives? How should these activities be split up to work effectively? How can each group of activities be best related to one another? Who are the key stakeholders? What resources do you have? (people, skills numbers, experience What processes are helped or hindered by current structure?

  8. Translating Purpose & Priorities into our Vision & Mission

  9. Vision focused organisations • Single focus & shared ownership? • Does it drive what staff do? • Reflected in strategy? • Is the Vision linked?

  10. Vision & Mission • "An image of our desired future“ A compelling description of how ‘a day in the life of the young person / family / victim / community’ is improved through the provision of YOT services • Mission is best described by what we do, how we do it & what benefits we offer

  11. Make delivering the vision a continuous process Mobilise vision through leadership Performance Leadership Motivate people to make delivering the vision everyone’s job Translate the vision into operational terms Align the organisation to vision Engagement

  12. Vision Development 1/2 • Part 1 - In your groups you have 10 minutes thinking about the vision statement for our YOT • The vision statement must be clear, motivating, memorable, client focused & be able to be turned into strategy • Write it down & be prepared to read it to the whole group

  13. Vision Development 2/2 • Part 2 - In turn, read your vision statement out to the whole group • Part 3 - We will now formulate a shared vision

  14. Review current structure and case for change

  15. SWOT Analysis Internal Factors Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats External Factors

  16. SWOT Exercise • Part 1 - In your groups you have 20 minutes to undertake a SWOT analysis of the current structure • Please be prepared to feedback to the whole group • Part 2 – Please report back on 2 points from each quadrant

  17. Appraising the Structural Change Options

  18. Structure Task Systems Culture Strategy 5 Key Elements in Organisation Design

  19. Suggested design principles 1/2 • The structure should: • Support delivery of YOT strategy • Support effective performance management • Offer a measure of resilience • Promote equitable distribution of workload • Ensure service delivery is most effective for the demographics of the area

  20. Suggested design principles 2/2 • And in relation to the delivery of change… • Avoid unnecessary change • Exploit the potential for organisational change to shape culture • But anticipate impending changes where possible (future-proofing)

  21. Organisational Design • Maximise efficiency & success • Facilitate working relationships • Maintain order & direction

  22. Guideline for Organisation Design 1/3 • Develop organisation chart

  23. Guideline for Organisation Design 2/3 • Identify ‘new’ roles • Clear documentation • Implement process

  24. Guideline for Organisation Design 3/3 • Information linkages • Vertical linkage • Horizontal linkage

  25. From Vision to Structure • The process of organising: • Division of Work: • Linking areas & jobs

  26. The Division of Work. • Division of Work • Breaking down jobs • Specialisation v repetition • Structure of Organisations • Organisation into logical groupings

  27. Common YOT Organisational Structures • Functional • Divisional/Generic • Hybrid • Matrix • Strategic Commissioning

  28. Functional Divisional / Generic Hybrid Matrix Strategic Commission Common YOT organisational Structures -if in a large organisation with multiple product lines -to give priority to product goals -combine elements of the other structures -if need to give equal priority to both products and functions -because of the dual pressures of both customers and the environment • -contract management of core services provided by third party, voluntary sector, social enterprise etc • Risk transference & potential cost savings • - Loss of control in core delivery and potentially strategic direction • -if efficiency is • Important -if in-depth knowledge and expertise is critical to organisational goals -if need control through vertical hierarchy

  29. Functional Structure

  30. Functional Structure • Main Features • Organised around tasks to be carried out • Centralised • Situations Where Appropriate • Small organisations, limited product or service diversity • Relatively stable situations with repetitive tasks • Advantages • Controlled by Chief Executive, with relatively simply lines of control • Efficient and cost effective • Clear lines of internal and external accountability • Specialist mangers develop expertise • Limitations • Succession problems - you create specialists, not generalists • Unlikely to be adaptive except at strategic leader level • Becomes stretched by growth as responsibilities diversify • Functional managers can concentrate on short-term activities at expense of longer-term strategic developments • Problems with co-ordinating the different functions and functional specialists may seek to empire-build

  31. Board / Strategic Leadership Centralised services : Personnel , Finance , Legal , Planning Team A Team B Team C Team D A D B C Functions Divisional/Generic

  32. Divisional Structure • Main Features • Reduced number of management layers & often include core activities within each division e.g. marketing, admin support etc. • Each division operates almost as a business in its own right • Within each division a functional structure exists • Divisions headed up by general managers who are responsible for their own resources • Decentralised • Situations Where Appropriate • Growing size and complexity, where appropriate splits exist (eg where there is a diverse range of products) • Turbulent environments • Geographic divisions can be used where markets very different and distance great • Advantages • Spreads responsibility for performance • Motivates managers and facilitates development of specialists and generalists • Enables adaptive change (‘emergent’ strategy) • Chief Exec stays aware from routine decisions and concentrates on corporate strategy • Can be innovative / entrepreneurial throughout the organisation • Limitations • Conflicts between divisions for resources • Confusion over locus of responsibility (head office or divisions) • Co-ordinating interdependencies difficult

  33. Specialist Portfolios include: • ETE • CAMHS • Substance misuse • Parenting • RJ etc etc Hybrid structure

  34. Hybrid Structure • Main Features – how the local government structure exists • Divisions are strategic business units of their own for planning & control purposes • Each • Divisions headed up by general managers who are responsible for their own resources • Decentralised • Situations Where Appropriate • Growing size and complexity, where appropriate splits exist (eg where there is a diverse range of products) • Turbulent environments • Geographic divisions can be used where markets very different and distance great • Advantages • Spreads responsibility for performance • Motivates managers and facilitates development of specialists and generalists • Enables adaptive change (‘emergent’ strategy) • Chief Exec stays aware from routine decisions and concentrates on corporate strategy • Can be innovative / entrepreneurial throughout the organisation • Limitations • Conflicts between divisions for resources • Confusion over locus of responsibility (head office or divisions) • Co-ordinating interdependencies difficult

  35. Strengths of the Hybrid Model Allows for single point management accountability for key areas e.g. RJ, FW, ETE etc Reflects the realities on the ground (e.g. location of buildings, courts, travel/geographical logistics, community boundaries) Managers having management responsibility for their teams but also specialist management functions across the YOT Good local integration opportunities

  36. Weaknesses of the Hybrid Model: • Does not demonstrate positioning of themed workers i.e. located within team, centralised resource covering all teams etc • Roles and responsibilities can become confused because of inevitable overlaps • It demands a high level of management team cohesion to negotiate and work with these tensions • It demands greater maintenance and communication as its flexibility is exploited over time

  37. Structural Forms:Matrix

  38. Matrix Structure • Main Features • Permanent and full dual control of operating units - although one wing generally more powerful than the other • Authority and accountability defined in terms of particular decisions • Situations Where Appropriate • Large multi-national, multi-product organisations with significant interrelationships and interdependencies • Small sophisticated service companies • Advantages • Decisions can be taken locally, decentralised within a large organisation, which might otherwise be bureaucratic • Optimum use of skills and resources - and high-quality informed decisions, reconciling conflicts within the organisation • Enables control of growth and increasing complexity • More opportunities for management development • Limitations • Difficult to implement and dual responsibilities can cause confusion - accountability and control problems • Potential conflict between the 2 wings, power issues • Decision-making can be slow • High overhead costs

  39. Strategic Commissioning Model • Main Features • Most YOTs have some form of commissioned service (e.g. Parenting, Appropriate Adult, ISS). • There are many gradients of commissioning which could be applied to services ranging from corporate support through to core service delivery. • Situations Where Appropriate • In response to fiscal challenge • Where pooling of resources may need to be considered • Aligns with new localism bill • When the delivery of outcomes may not be met by the current service • Advantages • Increases business opportunity • Risk transference • Reduced costs • Limitations • Profit overtakes welfare as driver • Breaking up of the YOT identity & purpose of vision • Potential lessening of strategic direction • Break up of stakeholder partnership relationships

  40. Group Discussion • How would you describe our YOT’s current structural form? • What structural forms have been used in past?

  41. Design a new structure

  42. Structure Design Exercise 1/4 • You have an unlimited pot of money to design the structure of our YOT using the job post laminates (see notes below) provided. • Using the design principles handout you have 30 minutes to:

  43. Structure Design Exercise 2/4 • Determine the YOTs major work divisions • Decide the most appropriate structural form i.e. functional etc • Arrange posts into logical teams • Name the individual teams • Identify key links between posts and teams

  44. Structure Design Exercise 3/4 • Part 1 Each table has 5 minutes to present their YOT structure designs • Part 2 Taking each structure in turn the whole group undertakes a SWOT analysis on each structure design • Part 3 As a group, the strengths and opportunities of each structure design will be amalgamated to design 1 YOT structure

  45. Structure Design Exercise 4/4 • Part 4 Each group has 10 minutes to SWOT the amalgamated design • Part 5 Each group has 5 minutes to feedback 1 point from each quadrant

  46. What will the change mean to me personally?

  47. Exercise • Taking the current structure and the newly designed structure, each group has x minutes to map the changes for individual posts. • How we might overcome barriers to this?

  48. How do we all manage the change process as smoothly as possible?