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Acknowledgments

Acknowledgments

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Acknowledgments

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  1. An informative title, formatted in “sentence case”, that attracts viewers and states or hints at “issue”, experimental approach, and study organism Your name(s) here — GIS Certificate Program, University of Washington, Tacoma Introduction This is a Microsoft Powerpoint template that has column widths and font sizes optimized for printing a 34 x 44” poster. In addition to its template use, this file has gratuitous advice on how to produce a good-looking poster that people might actually enjoy reading. • Results • Paragraphs of sentences are fine, but sometimes a simple list of “bullet” points can communicate results more effectively: • 9 out of 12 brainectomized rats survived the treatment. • Control rats completed maze faster, on average, than rats without intact brains (Fig. 3) (t = 9.84, df = 21, p = 0.032). • Note that figures are preferred but that tables are sometimes unavoidable (ANOVA results, for example, shown at right). A table looks best when it is first composed within Microsoft Word, then “Inserted” as an “Object”. • Also note that the layout for results section can (and probably should) be modified from this template, depending on how much text, charts, and photographs your specific experiment involved. Don’t be tempted to reduce font size in figure legends, axes labels, etc.—your viewers are probably most interested in reading your figures! • Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, Fig. 5. Be sure to separate this figure from other figures by generous use of white space. When figures are too cramped, viewers get confused about which figures to read first, and which legend goes with which figure. Note that you should turn text justification off when you are filling smaller text boxes such as this. Conclusions You can, of course, start your conclusions in column three if your results section is “data light”. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Fig. 1. Use a photograph or drawing here if it can quickly introduce a viewer to your question, organism, or the gene du jour. Use a non-serif font for figure legends to provide cue to reader that he/she is not reading normal text section. Materials and methods Do not indent the first paragraph in a section. This paragraph has “justified” margins, but be aware that left-justification is infinitely better if your font (at a particular size) doesn’t “space” nicely when justified. Sometimes spacing difficulties can be fixed by manually inserting hyphens into longer words (Powerpoint doesn’t do this automatically). Your main text is easier to read if you use a “serif” font such as Palatino or Times. Use a non-serif font for title and section headings. Be brief, and opt for photographs or drawings whenever possible to illustrate organism, protocol, or experimental design. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, Literature cited Bender, D.J., E.M Bayne, and R.M. Brigham. 1996. Lunar condition influences coyote (Canis latrans) howling. American Midland Naturalist 136:413-417. Northcutt, W. 2000. The Darwin Awards. Dutton, New York. Brooks, L.D. 1988. The evolution of recombination rates. Pages 87-105 in The Evolution of Sex, edited by R.E. Michod and B.R. Levin. Sinauer, Sunderland, MA. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2003. “Body mass index calculator.” http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/bmi/calc-bmi.htm (April 14, 2003). (a) (b) (c) Fig. 4(a-c). Make sure legends have enough detail to fully explain to the viewer what the results are. Note that for posters it is good to put some “Materials and methods” information within the figure legends—it allows the M&m section to be shorter, and gives viewer a sense of experiment(s) even if they have skipped directly to figures. Fig. 6. The use of connector lines can sometimes lead the viewer through your results better than text alone. Don’t overuse this option, however, or viewer will get dizzy. Acknowledgments We thank I. Güor for laboratory assistance, Herb Isside for greenhouse care, and M.I. Menter for statistical advice. Seeds were kindly donated by Burpee corporation. Funding for this project was provided by the nice people at the bank. [Note that people’s titles are omitted.] Fig. 2. Photograph or drawing of organism, chemical structure, or whatever focus of study is. Often you will have some more text-based results between your figures. This text should also guide the reader through the figures. Blah, blah, blah (Figs. 4a,b). Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah (Fig. 4c). Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah (data not shown). Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah (God, personal communication). Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Blah, blah, blah. Fig. 3. Illustration of important piece of equipment, or perhaps a flow chart summarizing experimental design. Use a non-serif font for all text, labels within figures. For further information Please contact email1@…….. give URL for general laboratory web site). A link to an online, PDF-version of poster is nice, too.