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Measuring Parental Progress: The role of effective Intervention and Prevention

Measuring Parental Progress: The role of effective Intervention and Prevention

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Measuring Parental Progress: The role of effective Intervention and Prevention

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  1. Measuring Parental Progress: The role of effective Intervention and Prevention Amy Mozingo, LPC Intern - BIPP Facilitator Chrissy Davis - BIPP Facilitator David Almager, MS- Director of BIPP

  2. Learning Objectives: This learning module will cover information on how to partner with battering intervention services to establish an effective community intervention, batterer accountability and victim/partner safety. Our goals for today are that you will be able to: • What is BIPP? • Identify the three categories of domestic violence • Learn what motivations are behind Coercive Control (battering) • Understand why and how a Batterer Can Change • Gain Knowledge of the Treatment Model (CPC Curriculum) • Accountability Groups for Men - An Inside Look (Control Log) • Case Study

  3. Share with Us…..What do you know about Battering intervention and prevention programs (bipp)?

  4. https://tcfv.org/resources/honoring-texas-victims/ Source: Texas Council on Family Violence

  5.  Texas Code of Criminal Procedure, Article 42.141 • Establishes TDCJ-CJAD duties of managing the Texas BIPP program • Outlines the requirement to contract with Statewide Nonprofit (TCFV)​ • Programs receiving referrals from court must be accredited by TDCJ-CJAD Source: Texas Council on Family Violence

  6. Texas BIPP Oversight History 1989 71st Legislature created Battering Intervention and Prevention Project; Texas Code of Criminal Procedure, Article 42.141 establishes BIPP; Funded 15 programs with $400,000 1993 – 1994  TCFV and TDCJ-CJAD Strategic Planning Workgroup developed BIPP Guidelines 1995 BIPP Guidelines become effective 1998 TCFV and TDCJ-CJAD Committee proposed revisions to the BIPP  Guidelines; 24 programs funded Source: Texas Council on Family Violence 1999 BIPP Guidelines revised 2007 80th Texas Legislature established accreditation for  BIPP  TDCJ-CJAD Committee establishes Accreditation Guidelines. 2009 BIPP Accreditation Guidelines become effective 2011 In response to the 82nd Legislative Session, which cut funding to BIPPs, TDCJ-CJAD created a new funding formula.    2015 Legislature approved 2nd increase in funding

  7. BIPP Texas has over 30 years of experience auditing programs and administering state funding. Texas regularly audits BIPP and collaborates with victim services/advocates. Offender Accountability Victim Safety Source: Texas Council on Family Violence

  8. Accreditation ProcessGoverned by: Texas Code of Criminal Procedure, Article 42.141  Source: Texas Council on Family Violence

  9. Currently 145 accredited BIPPs • 25 funded/accredited BIPPs  https://www.tdcj.texas.gov/divisions/cjad/bipp.html Source: Texas Council on Family Violence

  10. Appropriate for BIPP : • Intimate Partner Family / Domestic Violence has been identified, reported or an arrest had been made. This could include referrals from: • Protective Order - Probation • Parole - Conditional Dismissal • Family Court Conditions - CPS • Mental Health Professional - Self Referral • Other

  11. Types of Domestic Violence: • Coercive Control DV (Battering) • Resistive or Reactive Violence • Non-Battering Domestic Violence Source(2011, Pence, E., Connelly, L., Scaia, M, Turning Points: A Nonviolence Curriculum for Women)

  12. What is Battering ? An ongoing patterned use of intimidation, coercion, and violence as well as other tactics of control to establish and maintain a relationship of dominance over an intimate partner. When a person systematically utilizes various tactics of restricting an intimate partner’s autonomy and uses force or the threat of force as a coercive tactic. It is much more than a single act of violence or intimidation. Domestic Abuse Intervention Programs

  13. What is Resistive or Reactive Violence? • The use of force in many cases used by victims of domestic violence to control their abusers’ use of controlling tactics. • Can be used in reaction to other men’s violence against them as women • -Source(2011, Pence, E., Connelly, L., Scaia, M, Turning Points: A Nonviolence Curriculum for Women)

  14. What is Non-Battering Domestic Violence? • The violence used by one intimate partner against the other that is not an ongoing attempt to exert control through coercion. • It can encompass all other acts of intimate partner violence including violence related to mental illness, drug addiction, breakdown in social order (example: during war time or in a refugee camp) and violence with no ongoing pattern of coercive behaviors. • Source (2011. Pence, E., Connelly, L., Scaia, M, Turning Points: A Nonviolence Curriculum for Women)

  15. Understanding Types of DV to address treatment (11:55- 15:22) Ellen Pencehttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZeppoVr5f0

  16. Key questions for determining type of violence • Is there an on-going pattern? • Is the violence intended to instill fear? • Is the violence intended to dominate and control? Who did what to whom? When? How? With what impact? • Source (2019, Laura Connelly, Understanding Women’s Use of Violence in Context, TCFV BIPP Conference)

  17. Assessing Lethality: Danger Assessment www.dangerassessment.org

  18. How BIPP Works Services offered in English and Spanish

  19. Motivation for a Batterer…. • Sense of entitlement over his partner • The objectification of his partner - turning them into something less than human • Forced submission of his partner • Domination of partner through the use violence • Source (2011. Pence, E., Connelly, L., Scaia, M, Turning Points: A Nonviolence Curriculum for Women)

  20. Abuse? Compounded by but NOT CAUSED by: • Mental illness • Substance abuse • Poor impulse control • Issues with Anger • Generational violence • Communication deficits (separate treatment required)

  21. What are the Core Beliefs of a Batterer? • “I lost control” • “I wasn’t thinking” • “My way or the highway” • “The man is the head of the household” • “Men have the final say in all disagreements” • “Men are smarter than women” • “Real men don’t cry (or show emotion)” • “The criminal justice system is on the side of women and men receive unfair treatment”

  22. Can They Really Change?

  23. Batterers CAN change • Examine Past Abusive Behaviors: Control Log, Goals Worksheet, Videos /Vignettes, Self- Reflection Exercise • Be Accountable for Abusive Behaviors: Being Honest in Group, Challenge Belief Systems, Hold each other Accountable in Group, Watch out for Minimization, Denial, and Blame! • Learn New Non-Abusive Beliefs and Attitudes: Respect for partner, practice concepts of equability, seek guidance from women • Practice Non-Abusive Alternatives: Attend Group, Seek Help, Be a good Listener and Practice Positive Communication, Implement Plan for Non-Violence, Change thinking process!

  24. the Duluth Model : Principles of Men’s nonViolence Program • Increase the safety of women and children. • Rooted in the experience of women who have been battered. • Focus on challenging men’s historical and socially-constructed entitlement to be abusive and violent to women. • Established formal relationship with shelter/court advocates to provide safety for women and children. • Critical dialogue is central to creating an education process. • Respond to the safety , advocacy and empowerments needs of victims/partners. • Situated within a Community Coordinated Response – Safety of women and batterer accountability.

  25. Treatment Model : Weekly Education group; Cognitive Behavioral foundation; Gender based; Challenging men to become critical thinkers; Taking personal responsibility for violence and abuse through a dialogue processCreating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter: The Duluth Curriculum – Revision Edition 2011 (Pence, Paymar, et. al) • Nonviolence /Nonthreatening Behavior • Respect • Trust and Support • Honesty and Accountability • Responsible Parenting / Fatherhood • Partnership: Shared and Economic Responsibility • Sexual Respect • Impact of DV on Children • Lisa 911 call discussion

  26. Treatment Model :Treatment Creating a Process of Change for Men Who Batter: The Duluth Curriculum – Revision Edition 2011 (Pence, Paymar, et. al) Each them contains the following three parts: • Part One explores a theme from the Equality Wheel • Part Two explores the tactics on Power and Control Wheel • Part Three focuses on becoming nonviolent , more accountable, respectful, trusting, and supportive…

  27. Accountability Tools • Equality Wheel • Power and Control Wheel • Control Log • Equality Log • Group Dialogue • Qualified Facilitators Postive Modeling • Video Vignettes • Role Play • Supplemental Materials

  28. Development of Power and control wheelhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r9dZOgr78eE

  29. Assessing Accountability • Has he made full disclosure of abuse? • Is there recognition of unacceptable behavior? • Has he recognized that abuse is a choice? • Does he show empathy for victims of his abuse? • Abusive behavior identification? • Has he learned non-abusive alternatives to his abuse? • Is he willing to make amends in a meaningful way? • Does he accept the consequences of his actions? • Source: Bancroft & Silverman

  30. Questions to ask in Assessing Progress • Phase One (Intake, Groups 1-9) • Who is your facilitator? • When and where does your group meet? • What topics are you discussing in group? • Do you feel that the group will be beneficial for you? • Phase Two (Groups 9- 18) • What changes have you made since starting the program? • How comfortable are you talking about your abusive actions in the group? • Do you recognize the impact of your behavior on your partner and children?

  31. What you hear in group: • Group Vignette • Link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AGCmvL0iXc8 • Listen for: • Accountability Language • Minimization, Denial, Blame • Self Awareness • Group participants Challenging beliefs

  32. Case StudyClient: KB • 32 year old white man, married, 3 children • Referred by CPS & probation • Abused as a child • Mental health diagnosis PTSD • No medication, no suicide attempts • History of substance abuse

  33. ABI: Exit ABI: Intake

  34. Thoughts from KB : Pre and Post BIPP

  35. Something My Father Would Do: Overcoming Legacies of Family Violence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1pACKEPhxKQ www.futureswithoutviolence.org

  36. What Stops the Violence? CDC Multisite Study • N=840 batterers and their partners • Four big, established (>20 yr) PAIPs • (Pittsburg, Houston, Dallas, Denver) • Interviewed Victims and New Partners every 3 months for 4 years. • Recidivism: Cumulative (partner reports @48mos) 42% • 4th year follow-up re-offense was only 1 in 10 • Violence decreased in time with completers • Predicating re-assault during the program • Women’s feeling of Safety & Drunkenness Source: (2015 Larry Bennett, PAIP an Partner Abuse Intervention Systems New Mexico Batterers Intervention Task Force) and (2019 LC

  37. What Stops the Violence? CDC Multisite Study • Most men who assault new partner continue to assault old partner. • A small groups of men account for most of the re assaults • 80% of Survivors felt safer (3 months intervals) after 4 years. • Recommendations: • Swift interventions • Groups focused on stopping the violence and changing beliefs • Tight CCR • Source: (2015 Larry Bennett, PAIP an Partner Abuse Intervention Systems New Mexico Batterers Intervention Task Force) and (2019 LC