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Trade Routes established by 600 C.E.

Trade Routes established by 600 C.E.

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Trade Routes established by 600 C.E.

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  1. Trade Routes established by 600 C.E. Source: Freemanpedia Website – see link on Livebinder • You must be able to: • Locate them on a map • List empires that are connected to each other via these trade routes • List products (commodities), technology and inventions, diseases and beliefs that are travelling through these routes and the flow of direction from origin to end point • Sources: • Use selected pages in Ch. 8 • Use “Southernization” article by Lynda Shaffer • Use trade route videos found in “Supplemental Materials Unit 2 (Livebinder) see link on website

  2. Runs through the Central Asia steppes Silk Road

  3. Silk Road • Why it begins – Chinese Emperor of Han Dynasty wants “heavenly horses” from nomads of Central Asia. This begins contact and the exploration and opening up of trade routes throughout Central Asia • Method of travel • Camel caravans • Groups involved: • Central Asian steppe nomads, pastoralists, escorted caravans of merchants • Classical era empires played a role as being either suppliers of luxury products or as markets, places where demand for goods was high • Cultural exchange: • Zoroastrianism, Christianity and Manichaeism from west to Central Asia • monks, missionaries and pilgrims spread Buddhism from India to China • Buddhism most prominent faith of merchants 200 b.c.e. - 700 c.e. = carried to Central, East and S.E. Asia • Spread of technology: • Use of chariot warfare, mounted bowmen and the stirrup from Central Asia spreads east to China and west to the Mediterranean Region • Impact of stirrup in Europe = armored knights will dominate Feudal Europe • Impact of stirrup in China = will contribute to rise of Tang Dynasty due to their superior cavalry

  4. Silk Road - Impact • Spread of pathogens (germs) for epidemics, diseases such as smallpox, measles and the bubonic plague from Central Asia to both Han Dynasty of China and Roman Empire • Resulted in the death of 1/4 to 1/3 of the population in both empires dying, due to the spread of diseases moving along the Silk Roads • This became one of many factors explaining the collapse of both the Han and the Roman empires

  5. Indian Ocean Trade • You must be able to: • Locate them on a map • List empires that are connected to each other via these trade routes • List products (commodities), technology and inventions, diseases and beliefs that are travelling through these routes and the flow of direction from origin to end point • Use selected pages in Ch. 8 • Use “Southernization” article by Lynda Shaffer • Use trade route videos found in “Supplemental Materials Unit 2 (Livebinder) see link on website See places connected by this trade route. Early migrations – Groups came from S.E. Asia to Madagascar, introducing new foods such as bananas, yams and other S.E. Asian plants now in Africa

  6. Climate = using monsoons triangular lateen sails without oars = Indian Ocean trireme - Greek warship = Mediterranean Sea

  7. Indian OceanExchange of Products • From Africa: Exotic animals, giraffe, wood and ivory • From Persian Gulf: pearls • From India: spices • From S.E. Asia: spices and pottery obtained from China

  8. Spread of Religion Spread through bothIndian Ocean and Silk Roads trade routes • Hinduism: • From India to S.E. Asia: Java • Buddhism: • From India to S.E. Asia: Burma, Thailand, Sumatra Spread of Hinduism Spread of Buddhism

  9. Trans-Saharan Trade The introduction of camel domestication in the Middle East, later spreading to northern Africa made this route possible. desert nomads escort the caravans through the desert. Short article explains trade route: http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/lesson_plans/currency/essay2.html From the northern coast of Africa came salt From the equatorial, forested area of Africa came gold, also palm oil and kola nuts Berbers from northern Africa traveled across the Sahara escorting merchant caravans.

  10. Climate zones of Africa This is important in determining where salt and gold is produced. Salt mines came from the desert and gold came from the forested region. The area in between is known as the Sahel and this is where trading cities emerged. Later, between 600 and 1450, major kingdoms will develop in this region: Ghana, Mali and Songhay Northern Africa Southern coast of Sahara Desert Sahel = coast of Sahara Equatorial forest zone