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Stealing What Teachers Need to Know About Students Who Steal Are they trying to “steal” your love?

Stealing What Teachers Need to Know About Students Who Steal Are they trying to “steal” your love?

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Stealing What Teachers Need to Know About Students Who Steal Are they trying to “steal” your love?

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  1. StealingWhat Teachers Need to Know About Students Who StealAre they trying to “steal” your love? By: Keri Kastner

  2. Learner Objectives Participants in this seminar will be able to: • Name the Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders • Describe conduct disorder and its behaviors • Define stealing as a behavior associated with conduct disorder • Identify ways to recognize a child that steals due to conduct disorder • State the biological, school, and family factors that contribute to stealing • Identify the legal safeguards in PA in terms of a child with conduct disorder • Describe ways in which schools can help • Identify websites that offer more information

  3. DSM-IV-TR Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders • Conduct Disorder • Oppositional Defiant Disorder • Attention Deficit Disorder

  4. Conduct Disorder As listed in the DSM-IV-TR • “A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated, as manifested by the presence of three (or more) of the following criteria in the past 12 months, with at least one criterion present in the past 6 months.” Types of Behaviors: • Aggression to people • Aggression to animals • Destruction of property • Deceitfulness or theft • Serious violations of rules American Psychiatric Association 2000. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition, text revision. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, Inc.

  5. Definition Stealing “In the criminal law, theft (also known as stealing) is the illegal taking of another person's property without that person's freely-given consent. As a term, it is used as shorthand for all major crimes against property.” (2007). Wikipedia. Retrieved October 20, 2007, from Theft Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theft

  6. Glossary of Terms Attention-Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders • CD - Conduct Disorder • ODD - Oppositional Defiant Disorder • ADD - Attention Deficit Disorder Conduct Disorder • DBD - Disruptive Behavior Disorder Stealing • Theft • Burglary • Shoplifting

  7. Prevalence Conduct Disorder • Estimated to occur in 4% to 10% of children • Prevalent in boys • Accurate number of cases unknown • Most females exhibit “feminine” type antisocial behavior • Lying • Running away • Substance abuse • Most males exhibit “masculine” type antisocial behavior • Vandalism • Fighting • Stealing

  8. How To Identify The Problem Deceitfulness or theft • Has broken into someone else’s house, building, or car • Often lies to obtain goods or favors or to avoid obligations (i.e., “cons” others) • Has stolen items of nontrivial value without confronting a victim (e.g., shoplifting, but without breaking and entering; forgery) American Psychiatric Association 2000. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 4th edition, text revision. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, Inc.

  9. Biological Factors • Neurological dysregulation • Child’s temperament • Predictability of response • Cognitions • Deficits in social problem solving

  10. School Factors • Low intellectual functioning • Low academic achievement • Reading disabilities • 28 months behind peers • Physical attributes of the school • Teacher availability • Teacher’s praise • Emphasis on individual responsibility • Emphasis on academic work • Student teacher ratio • Child seen as dishonest • Poor peer relations Kauffman, J.M. (2005). Characteristics of emotional and behavioral disorders of children and youth, 8th Edition. Columbus, Ohio: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall Publishing Company.

  11. Family and Cultural Factors • Maternal depression • Parental alcoholism • Antisocial behavior in mother or father • Insular mothers • Divorce • Poverty • High crime neighborhoods • Stress

  12. Stealing At Home? • Stealing most often occurs outside of the home • Normally disturbs community, not the home • Parents blame others for missing items Kauffman, J.M. (2005). Characteristics of emotional and behavioral disorders of children and youth, 8th Edition. Columbus, Ohio: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall Publishing Company.

  13. Legal Safeguards in PA Chapter 14 Under Chapter 14, a child diagnosed with conduct disorder may receive necessary support from the district which will afford the student the opportunity to participate in and benefit from educational programs in his or her school.

  14. What Can You Do? • Meet with student’s family • Operationally define stealing • Meet with school principal & child’s team • List class items that go missing • Develop consequences for all acts of stealing • Initiate a behavioral anti-stealing program consistent with family program

  15. What To Avoid • Illegal search and seizure • Child may feel threatened • Positive reinforcements • Child may have stolen items that are unknown to anyone else • No way of knowing if a child is being honest • False accusations • Child may not have stolen • Child looses trust

  16. Information For Parents What parents can do: • Provide structure and support • Provide tight supervision • Set limits and rules • Use time outs and consistently enforce • Be aware of child’s possessions • Be open about their feelings; speak with other parents that may be dealing with similar difficulties. Join a support group or online forum such as: www.conductdisorders.com For more information, please refer to parent brochure

  17. Where To Get Help Where to get help in Pittsburgh: Western Psychiatric Institute &Clinic (412) 624-1000 or 1-877-624-4100 3811 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 http://wpic.com/ChildAdolescentSvcs.htm “For more than 50 years, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic (WPIC) has been a national leader in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of mental health and addictive disorders. As part of UPMC, WPIC not only provides the most comprehensive range of behavioral health services available today, but is also shaping tomorrow’s behavioral health care through clinical innovation, research, and education.” Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic.(2007). Child and Adolescent Services. Retrieved September 25, 2007 from http://wpic.upmc.com/ChildAdolescentSvcs.htm

  18. More Help Mercy Behavioral Health North (412) 323-4500 412 East Commons, Pittsburgh PA 15212 South (412) 488-4040 2100 Wharton St., Suite 200, Pittsburgh, PA 15203 http://www.mercybehavioral.org “Mercy Behavioral Health (MBH) serves the Greater Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania) region by providing a full continuum of recovery-oriented, community-based mental health, mental retardation, and drug/alcohol treatment and prevention services. From locations in many neighborhoods throughout Allegheny County, we work to help people improve their quality of life so they will thrive in their communities. MBH staff is also trained to meet the unique needs of people with more than one diagnosis (such as mental illness and addiction, or mental retardation and mental illness).” Mercy. Mercy Behavioral Health. (n.d.). Conduct Disorder in Children and Adolescents. Retrieved September 25, 2007 from http://www.mercybehavioral.org/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=521&cn=37

  19. National Resources National Resources: • SAMHSA's National Mental Health and Substance Abuse Center http://mentalhealth.samhsa.gov • American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatrywww.aacap.org • National Institute of Mental Healthwww.nimh.nih.gov

  20. Case Study Thirteen (2003)

  21. Questions For Case Study #1 • What is going on in the scene? • Do you think the character exhibited signs of stealing as associated with conduct disorder? • Do you think this child stole because she has a conduct disorder or other community-based factors? • Discuss in your group what other thoughts or questions come to mind when watching this movie clip.

  22. Case Study Travis, a fifteen year old boy, is a sophomore at a local public high school. He is the youngest of three children and lives in an apartment with his sister, brother and mother. Travis’s mom works two jobs to keep the family together. Often times, Travis finds himself alone and without parental supervision in that both his brother and sister have after school jobs. Travis’s mother harbors resentment for her children and does not show any form of attachment towards them since their father walked out on them 10 years ago. Obviously, Travis has no accountability or stability in his home life. He is often alone and isolated from any adult interaction, affection, communication and supervision. One evening, Travis’s mother receives a phone call from his high school principal. She advised his mother that many items belonging to other students have been reported missing from locker rooms, for example, watches, expensive tennis shoes, coats, hats, backpacks and money. The principal went on to say that Travis was the student accused of taking these items. Not only has he been seen walking around the school wearing many of the missing items, another student in the gym class had witnessed Travis taking items.

  23. Questions for Case Study #2 • From what you learned in this presentation, how do you think the mother will respond to the principal’s phone call? • If you were this child’s teacher, what would be the first step in helping this family? • How would you specifically help this child in school?

  24. References • Allegheny County Department of Human Services. (2006-2007). Where to Call Directory of Mental health and Drug and Alcohol Services. Retrieved on September 15, 2007 from • http://www.alleghenycounty.us/uploadedFiles/DHS/About_DHS/Publications/ Resource_Guides/OBHWheretoCall.pdf. • American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. (2007).Facts for Families, Children who Steal. retrieved on September 25, 2007 from http://www.aacap.org/cs/root/facts_for_families/children_who_steal. • American Psychiatric Association 2000. (DSM-IV-TR) Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental d disorders, 4th edition, text revision. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Press, Inc.As stated by the DSM-IV-TR. • Chandler, J, MD, FRCPC. (n.d.). Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) and Conduct Disorder (CD) In children and adolescents: diagnosis and treatment. Retrieved on September 25, 2007, from • http://www.klis.com/chandler/pamphlet/oddcd/oddcdpamphlet.htm. • Conduct Disorders, a Soft Place to Land for the Battle Weary Parents. (n.d.). Retrieved on September 25, 2007, from http://www.conductdisorders.com. • Duff, Jacques (2005). Disruptive behaviors and conduct disorder. Retrieved on October 25, 2007, from disruptive Behavior Disorders Web site: http://www.adhd.com.au/conduct.html • Kauffman, J.M. (2005). Characteristics of emotional and behavioral disorders of children and youth, 8th Edition. Columbus, Ohio: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall Publishing Company. • Mercy. Mercy Behavioral Health. (n.d.). Conduct Disorder in Children and Adolescents. Retrieved on September 25, 2007 from http://www.mercybehavioral.org/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc &id=521&cn=37 • Thirteen. Fox Searchlight Pictures (2003) (USA) (theatrical) • University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (n.d.). Conduct Disorder. Retrieved on September 23, 2007 from ttp://www.upmc.com/HealthManagement/ManagingYourHealth HealthReference/Diseases/?chunkiid=222865 • Western Psychiatric Institute & Clinic.(2007). Child and Adolescent Services. Retrieved September 25, 2007 from http://wpic.upmc.com/ChildAdolescentSvcs.htm • (2007). Wikipedia. Retrieved October 20, 2007, from Theft Web site: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theft

  25. Contact Information Keri Ann Kastner Kastnerkeri@hotmail.com 626 Driftwood Drive Pittsburgh, Pa 15238