Intro to Chapter 42 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

intro to chapter 42 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Intro to Chapter 42 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Intro to Chapter 42

play fullscreen
1 / 13
Intro to Chapter 42
146 Views
Download Presentation
gil-best
Download Presentation

Intro to Chapter 42

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Intro to Chapter 42 In small groups of 3 or 4 complete the following questions on chart paper. 1. Define Privacy in general 2. Define Privacy at • School • Home • Work • on the phone • on the computer 3. Why is it important for your privacy to be protected 4. When it is ok for your right to privacy to be violated? (by parents, teachers, the govt, etc)

  2. Chapter 42: The Right to Privacy

  3. Right to Privacy • The Constitution creates “zones of privacy”: • Freedoms of speech and association (1) • Freedom not to quarter soldiers (3) • Freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures (4) • The right to remain silent (5) • Unspecified people’s rights (9)

  4. Right to Privacy • Deciding a constitutional right to privacy involves weighing competing private interests and government interests Ex: The right to privacy of sex offenders v. the public’s right to know and to protect children http://sexoffender.ncdoj.gov/

  5. Privacy in the Home • People have a reasonable amount of privacy in their homes (need a search warrant to search a person’s home) • Lawrence v. Texas (2003) – Pg. 528 • The Case of…pg.493  Turn to it!

  6. Privacy at • Limited in school  courts uphold search of desks & lockers (even with only reasonable suspicion) • Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act of 1974 – Parents have the right to inspect their child’s grade/prohibits release of information without parental consent Teacher Privacy

  7. Information Gathering and Privacy • Computers allow businesses and organizations to collect and store detailed information about people. Sometimes people’s information is then sold to other businesses and other organizations. i.e. adds on the sides of webpages

  8. Ex: Banks are required to keep copies of all checks written or deposited by customers. However, customers must be notified if their records are requested for an investigation.

  9. Right to Privacy • The Privacy Act of 1974: prevents the government from releasing most information about an individual without that person’s written consent (medical, financial, criminal, and employment records)

  10. Right to Privacy USA Patriot Act (passed after Sept 11, 2001): federal law enforcement officials can request records needed to investigate terrorism without a warrant or probable cause

  11. USA Patriot Act • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFVQ0HZz2mc • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqXmQYHV-1I • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgAzthHQq9A&feature=fvw The report says that in the period starting with the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks and ending May 5, Justice Department  terrorism investigations resulted in charges against 310 people, with 179 convictions or guilty pleas. The Patriot Act, Justice officials say, was instrumental in these cases. (foxnews.com)

  12. Reproductive Rights and Privacy • Pro-Life (life begins at conception and must be protected from that moment on) OR Pro-Choice (a woman must be allowed to control her own body and not have laws to regulate her personal choices) • Roe v. Wade: A women has the legal right to abortion in certain circumstances, but it is not absolute.

  13. Reproductive Rights and Privacy • Should the U.S. government have the right to determine whether or not one should have a child?