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Air Ground Integration (AGI) & Capabilities Brief PowerPoint Presentation
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Air Ground Integration (AGI) & Capabilities Brief

Air Ground Integration (AGI) & Capabilities Brief

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Air Ground Integration (AGI) & Capabilities Brief

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  1. UNCLASSIFIED Air Ground Integration (AGI)& Capabilities Brief 1-211th ARB / 2-211th GSAB PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  2. Agenda UNCLASSIFIED • Task Organization • Aerial vs. Ground Perspective • Attack / Recon Aircraft • Air-Ground Integration • Air Assault Mission Planning • General Support Aviation • MEDEVAC/CASEVAC • Questions PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  3. Aerial vs. Ground Perspective UNCLASSIFIED PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  4. UNCLASSIFIED What you see… A Marines Perspective PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  5. UNCLASSIFIED What we see… Aviator’s Perspective PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014

  6. Attack / Recon UNCLASSIFIED PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  7. UNCLASSIFIED AH-64D Apache Longbow Cruise Airspeed ~ 110 Knots Combat Radius ~ 250 Km Flight Time ~ 3 Hours PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014

  8. UNCLASSIFIED Weapon Systems PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014

  9. UNCLASSIFIED Copilot/Gunner Sight Systems LST: Laser Spot Tracker DTV: Day TV DVO: Direct View Optics LRF/D: Laser Range Finder / Designator FLIR: Forward Looking Infrared TADS: Target Acquisition / Designation System AN/ASQ-170 PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  10. AH-64D Apache – General Information Night Capabilities: Night Vision Goggle (NVG) equipped IR Laser Pointer – Low, High, or Pulse Forward Looking Infra-red (FLIR) a.k.a. Thermal Standard Weapons Load: 3 x HELLFIRE Laser Guided Missiles (K2A, M, N) 19 x 2.75 in. Folding Fin Aerial Rockets: -12x Point Detonating High Explosive -4x IR illumination -3x Flechette (1179 “darts”) 330 x 30mm High Explosive Dual Purpose Total Aloft Time: ~ 3 hours Mission Time: ~ 2 hours Callsign Example: PIRATE 13/14 1-211th ARB 1-211th ARB The Apache Longbow is a very capable attack platform. But like any airframe, it has limitations. Make sure you understand the distances from which weapons can be employed and distance sensors can be used for reconnaissance. It is important to understand the different munitions and what they provide. On request, the Apache can deliver visual or IR illumination over an objective – up to three minutes, per rocket. Some aircraft are equipped with the FCR (Fire Control Radar), which can be used to quickly find and target enemy tanks, ADA, and other ground vehicles. PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  11. UNCLASSIFIED Air-Ground Integration - Defined Operations must be integrated so air and ground forces can simultaneously work in the operational environment to achieve a common objective. Integration maximizes combat power through synergy of both forces. The synchronization of aviation operations into the ground commander’s scheme of maneuver may also require integration of other services or coalition partners. It may also require integration of attack reconnaissance, assault, and cargo helicopters. FM 3-04.126, Attack Reconnaissance Helicopter Operations PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  12. UNCLASSIFIED Air-Ground Integration – How To Effective integration of Air and Ground assets is required to successfully conduct combined arms operations. Each element (air and ground) brings unique capabilities and limitations to the brigade commander. Integration starts at home station with implementation of effective SOP’s, habitual relation-ships, and air-ground team training. It continues through planning, preparation, and execution of the operation. FM 3-20.971, Brigade Reconnaissance Troop PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  13. UNCLASSIFIED Aviation Planning Considerations PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  14. UNCLASSIFIED AGI in the Planning Process • AGI, or Air to Ground Integration, is how the ground and air elements “get on the same page.” • Plan for aviation on appropriate missions (CCAs, MEDEVAC, CASEVAC) – be familiar with the Air Mission Request (AMR) Process. • Plan and predict timing of the decisive point and/or key goals that need to be accomplished • Give specific task and purpose (update frequently) • Plan can not always be exclusively dependent upon aviation • Understand aviation limitations, by airframe • Exchange of common maneuver graphics PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  15. UNCLASSIFIED 2KM by 2KM TRP A-3 B-4 A-4 B-3 1 2 B-1 B-2 A-2 A-1 Objective PL Longstreet C-2 C-1 D-1 D-2 4 3 C-3 Aircraft (Interdict/Isolate) N PL Gruber TCP 1 TCP 2 TCP 3 Graphic Control Measures Are common graphics being shared? PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  16. UNCLASSIFIED AH-64 AH-64 Key Hole CAS A IP E D B C PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  17. UNCLASSIFIED • CCA, or Close Combat Attack, is defined as a coordinated attack by Army Aircraft against targets that are in close proximity to friendly forces. • CCA communications are IAW current J-Fire, J-Brevity manuals – the ground element interfacing with aircraft should be familiar with the J-Fire Manual (FM 3-09.32) – especially brevity terms and danger close distances. • Army Attack helicopters not considered a CAS platform – CCA is “Friendly Centric” and CAS is “Target Centric” • Army attack provides CCA and can provide recon / ISR as necessary. • Due to enhanced SA, habitual relationship with Army Ground Forces, Army CCA does not necessarily require terminal control from JTAC or FAC. • Army prefers CCA method. Aircrews can conduct 5 OR 9 Line when supporting JTAC/FAC , or when customer is not familiar with CCA procedures. Army prefers the CCA 5 Line over the CAS 9 Line. CCA PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  18. UNCLASSIFIED Aircraft Check-In PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  19. UNCLASSIFIED What A Ground Unit Should Hear from the Aircraft Aircraft Check-In PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  20. UNCLASSIFIED Ground Commander SITREP PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  21. UNCLASSIFIED • CCA 5-Line Briefing is a FRAGO given from Ground to Air • Transmission of the CCA 5-line is Clearance to Fire • When Danger Close, Ground Commander must accept increased risk by Verbally stating “ Cleared Danger Close” with Ground Commanders Initials. • Danger Close may be preplanned. In the event of Danger Close, it is highly recommended for ground elements to get in a defensive, prone position. • Given in Remarks Section – Line 5 • Additional Restrictions are passed in line 5 • CCA 5-line should be passed to Air Mission Commander (AMC) as early as possible to formulate an attack plan. CCA 5-Line PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  22. UNCLASSIFIED What Aircraft Should Hear from the Ground Unit Ground Commander SITREP PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  23. UNCLASSIFIED Danger Close / RED PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  24. Questions? UNCLASSIFIED PREPARED BY 1-211th ARB TACOPS MARCH 2014 UNCLASSIFIED

  25. UNCLASSIFIED Air Assault Mission Planning

  26. Air Assault Air assault operations are the movement of assault forces using the firepower, mobility, and total integration of helicopter assets to engage and destroy enemy forces or seize and hold key terrain. Air assaults allow friendly forces to strike over extended distances and terrain to attack the enemy when and where it is most vulnerable. FM 3-04.113 UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED

  27. UNCLASSIFIED AGENDA • WHY DO WE DO AIR ASSAULTS? • HOW DO WE DO AIR ASSAULTS? UNCLASSIFIED

  28. UNCLASSIFIED • WHY AIR ASSAULTS? • To strike over extended distances and • obstacles with fast and flexible • precision. • Can land to the X or the Y. • Advantages • Ability to Bypass Obstacles • Add Flexibility/Surprise to an Operation • Time Sensitive Targets (TSTs) UNCLASSIFIED

  29. UNCLASSIFIED IED Bypass Defenses and Obstacles The ability to circumvent enemy defenses and obstacles; allows the ground commander to reach areas not allowed by ground means of travel. UNCLASSIFIED

  30. UNCLASSIFIED Flexibility/Surprise Forces the enemy to react to decisions made by the ground commander; the notion the ground commander is or can be “everywhere at once.” UNCLASSIFIED

  31. UNCLASSIFIED Time Sensitive Targets (TST) / Missions Provides the ability to land to a precise place at a precise time. UNCLASSIFIED

  32. The Reverse Planning Sequence. Successful air assault execution is based on a careful analysis of METT-TC and detailed, precise reverse planning. Five basic plans that comprise the reverse planning sequence are developed for each air assault operation. Five basic plans are: (1) The ground tactical plan (GTP). (Ground Element Plan of Attack after Landing) (2) The landing plan. (Where the Helicopters are going to land) (3) The air movement plan. (How the Helicopters go from base to landing zone) (4) The loading plan. (How you are going to get on/off the helicopter) (5) The staging plan. (Planning, Preparations) UNCLASSIFIED How do we do air assaults? UNCLASSIFIED

  33. Planning in this Sequence PZ AVN LZ 1 SP RP OBJ PZ LZ GND LANDING AIR MVMNT LOADING STAGING GND TAC PLAN LZ SELECTION OVERWATCH PLAN PATHFINDER USE A/C FLOW INTO LZ ACT IONS ON THE OBJ BASIS FOR OTHER PLANS DEFINES ATK ROLES AIR MOVE TABLE FLT ROUTES A2C2 PLAN ATK A/C RT RECON ARMED ESCORT PZ SELECTION PZ ORGANIZATION BUMP PLAN MARSHALL PLAN PZ CONTROL Execute in this Sequence UNCLASSIFIED AIR ASSAULT PLANNING THE FIVE AIR ASSAULT PLANS

  34. UNCLASSIFIED Agility is the ability of friendly forces to react faster than the enemy and is a prerequisite for seizing and holding the initiative. It is as much a mental as a physical quality. UNCLASSIFIED

  35. UNCLASSIFIED Questions? UNCLASSIFIED

  36. UNCLASSIFIED General Support Aviation

  37. UNCLASSIFIED General Support Aviation Planning Mission Configurations: • Seats in (UH): 11 personnel • Seats out (UH): 16-20 personnel • Seats in (CH): 33 personnel (CH-47F has 2 Additional Crew Seats) • CASEVAC Aircraft: (UH) 3 litters and 1 ambulatory or as many ambulatory as seats are available on board (CH) 12 Litter, 24 Litter With Litter Kit Installed • All flights will have 1 x AVN O/C and 1 x Ground O/C on board PZ/LZ Selection (Supported unit responsibility) • Size – Planning dimensions: (FM 90-4) • UH-60 – 50 meters • CH-47 – 80 meters Sling Load Operations: • UH-60 A Max Weight 8,000 lbs • UH-60 L/M Max Weight 9,000 lbs • CH-47 Max Weight 26,000 lbs (Multiple Hook Loads) UNCLASSIFIED

  38. UNCLASSIFIED CH-47F Capabilities UNCLASSIFIED

  39. UNCLASSIFIED Typical Missions • Air Assault • Resupply • Air Movement • Sling Loads • Downed aircraft recovery (DART) • Gun Raids (105 and 155mm Howitzers) • High Altitude Ops and Rescue UNCLASSIFIED

  40. UNCLASSIFIED Lift Capabilities • Weights • Max gross: 50,000 lbs • Basic Weight: approx 31,000 lbs • Mission Weight: approx 33,000 lbs w/fuel, msn equip • Lifting Capability: 17,000 lbs

  41. UNCLASSIFIED External Loading • Three hooks provide versatile loading capability for diverse missions • Center Hook: Max 26,000 lbs • Forward and Aft Hook: Max 17,000 lbs each • Tandem Loads: Max 25,000 lbs • Bottom Line: 17,000 lbs of total lift capacity in the hot desert environment. • Customer is responsible for rigging and certifying the load. UNCLASSIFIED

  42. UNCLASSIFIED External Loading UNCLASSIFIED

  43. UNCLASSIFIED Internal Loading • Carry 3x AF 463L Pallets or Skids (4’wide, 8’long, 52” high) weighing no more than 7500 pounds each. • Pallets require Forklift support during upload • Floor loaded cargo requires increased manpower and ground time requirements. • Able to load vehicles. UNCLASSIFIED

  44. UNCLASSIFIED Internal Loading Approx 66 passengers w/ out seat belts (Record is ~120+ passengers) UNCLASSIFIED

  45. UNCLASSIFIED Planning Considerations • Chinooks can DESTROY equipment on PZs and LZs. • Winds in excess of 150 MPH • Company size Chinook Air Assaults are force multipliers. UNCLASSIFIED

  46. UNCLASSIFIED “You Call, We Haul”

  47. UNCLASSIFIED MEDEVAC / CASEVAC • Force Multiplier: • Allows Maneuver Commander to Continue Mission • Preserves our Greatest Assets • Builds Confidence UNCLASSIFIED

  48. UNCLASSIFIED Capabilities CASEVAC– The movement of casualties to initial medical treatment facilities and movement of casualties to MTFs in the combat zone. It does not include en route care by medical personnel and implies that nonmedical assets are being used to move casualties. MEDEVAC – Timely, efficient movement and en route care by medical personnel of the wounded, injured, and ill persons, from the battlefield and other locations to medical treatment facilities (MTFs). The term MEDEVAC refers to both ground and air evacuation assets. If calling for MEDEVAC, the standard format is the 10 Line, formerly 9 Line MEDEVAC. An example is provided on the next slide. In order to launch, the first 5 lines are needed – the rest can be provided en route to pick up. UNCLASSIFIED

  49. UNCLASSIFIED MEDEVAC Request 1 - Location of Pickup (Encrypt the coordinates) 2 - Frequency, Call sign, and Suffix (if used) NOTE: Callsignand suffix may be transmitted in the clear 3 - # of Patients by Precedence A – Urgent B – Surgery C – Priority D – Routine E – Convenience 4 - Special Equipment Required A – None B – Hoist C – Extraction equipment D – Ventilator 5 - # of Patients by Type L + # of patients (Litter) A + # of patients (Ambulatory) 6 - Security of Pickup Site N – No enemy in area P – Possible enemy in area, use caution E – Enemy in area, approach with caution X – Enemy in area, armed escort required 7 - Method of Marking Pickup Site A – Panels B – Pyrotechnic signal C – Smoke signal D – None E – Other 8 - Patient Nationality and Status A – US military B – US citizen C – Non-US military D – Non-US citizen E – Enemy prisoner of war 9 - CBRN Contamination C – Chemical B – Biological R – Radiological N – Nuclear 10 – MIST: Mechanism of Injury Injury Sustained Vital Signs Treatment Given UNCLASSIFIED

  50. Suitable Clear of obstructions Area not likely for ambush Hard packed dirt, gravel, or pavement Clear of vehicles and personnel (to include ground guides) Not Suitable Contains debris (commo wire, engineer tape, loose equipment) Wires in vicinity Unstaked VS-17 panels Contains obstacles (ie. Towers, light poles) Not cleared of possible IEDs Personnel marking PZ Loose dirt (brownout conditions) Vicinity of a road turn (IED target areas) 7 Paces 14 Paces 14 Paces X TOUCHDOWN UNCLASSIFIED Pick-up Zone Selection Direction of Wind Direction of Landing UNCLASSIFIED