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Continuous Improvement Planning for Perkins

Continuous Improvement Planning for Perkins

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Continuous Improvement Planning for Perkins

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  1. Continuous Improvement PlanningforPerkins April 1, 2010 Oregon Department of Education 2010

  2. Outline of Presentation • Overview of Planning – the Logic Model • Perkins Continuous Improvement Cycle • SMART Goals and Objectives • Perkins Continuous Improvement Cycle (cont.) • Local Plan Update – Logic Model, SMART Goals, and Perkins Continuous Improvement Planning Oregon Department of Education 2010

  3. Alice and the Cheshire Cat “‘Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?’ ‘That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,’ said the Cat.” Oregon Department of Education 2010

  4. Alice and the Cheshire Cat “‘I don’t much care where –’ said Alice. ‘Then it doesn’t matter which way you go,’ said the Cat. ‘—so long as I get SOMEWHERE,’ Alice added as an explanation. ‘Oh, you’re sure to do that,’ said the Cat, ‘if you only walk long enough.’” Oregon Department of Education 2010

  5. Improvement Planning Questions • What outcomes do you hope to achieve? • What are you already doing? • Is it working? • Are your efforts focused on improvement? • Are your efforts district-wide? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  6. Improvement Planning Questions (cont.) • Do your efforts include all of the systems involved? • Are your efforts based on research-validated practices? • Can your efforts be evaluated? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  7. Improvement Planning Agreement We will use a linear model to talk about a process that is multi-dimensional Oregon Department of Education 2010

  8. The Logic Model Move from “What is being done?” to “What needs to be done?” Oregon Department of Education 2010

  9. Logic Model (cont.) • Working from inputs to outcomes • Limits one’s thinking to existing activities, programs, and research questions • Working from intended outcomes to inputs • Creates a forum for new ideas or concepts Oregon Department of Education 2010

  10. Logic Model (cont.) • Working from inputs to outcomes • Limits one’s thinking to existing activities, programs, and research questions • Working from intended outcomes to inputs • Creates a forum for new ideas or concepts Oregon Department of Education 2010

  11. Logic Model Terms Situation External Influences Inputs Outputs Outcomes Evaluation Oregon Department of Education 2010

  12. Logic Model: Situation • Statement of the problem • Description of who is affected by the problem • Who else is interested in the problem Oregon Department of Education 2010

  13. Logic Model: Situation (cont.) • Establishes a baseline • Provides a way to determine if change has occurred • Describes who is affected by the problem • Allows assessment of who has benefited • Identifies stakeholders • Increases awareness, reduces cost Oregon Department of Education 2010

  14. Logic Model: External Influences • Document the external influences on outcomes (social, physical, political, and institutional environments; policies; etc.) • Who are important partners/collaborators? • Which part(s) of the issue can this Plan realistically influence? • What evaluation will accurately reflect outcomes? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  15. Logic Model: Inputs • What is invested • Funds • Knowledge and Skills • Time • Expertise • Facilities and equipment • Collaborator involvement Oregon Department of Education 2010

  16. Logic Model: Inputs (cont.) • Helps set parameters for planning • Provides evidence that helps communicate the quality and cost of implementing the Plan Oregon Department of Education 2010

  17. Logic Model: Outputs • Things we do • Products provided, goods and services delivered • Publications, web pages • Workshops • People we reach • Higher achieving students, constituents who become informed, decision makers who become knowledgeable Oregon Department of Education 2010

  18. Logic Model: Outputs (cont.) • Allows us to establish linkages between the problem (situation) and the impact of the program (intended outcomes) • Aligns what we do with the impact it has Oregon Department of Education 2010

  19. Logic Model: Outcomes • Short-, intermediate-, and long-term • Answer the question, “What happened as a result of our activities?” • Communicate the impacts of our investment Oregon Department of Education 2010

  20. Logic Model: Outcomes – Example • Situation: low student scores • Which students? Which scores? Why are scores low? • Strategy: give teachers specific skills they can use to impact student achievement • Skills to address the reason for the low scores • Activity: provide professional development Oregon Department of Education 2010

  21. Logic Model: Short-term Outcome • Short-term outcome: participants possess the necessary skills to resolve the situation • Professional development activity was successful • Is the number of participants sufficient? • How will you know that they possess the necessary skills? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  22. Logic Model: Intermediate-term Outcome • Intermediate-term outcome: participants successfully apply the skills in the classroom • The activity may be successful, but the skills must be applied for the strategy to be successful • How will you know that they successfully applied the skills in the classroom? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  23. Logic Model: Long-term Outcome • Long-term outcome: application of skills in the classroom positively impacts student achievement • Strategy of using professional development to increase skills that teachers can use to impact student achievement was successful • How will you know that it was this strategy was the reason for improved student achievement? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  24. Logic Model: Evaluation • Were inputs made as planned? • Amount of input, timing, quality of input • Investments of funds, time, expertise, equipment, etc. • Were activities conducted as planned? • Content, timing, location, format, quality • Were intended outcomes realized? • Short-, intermediate-, and long-term Oregon Department of Education 2010

  25. Logic Model Terms Situation External Influences Inputs Outputs Outcomes Evaluation Oregon Department of Education 2010

  26. Logic Model (cont.) • Working from inputs to outcomes • Limits one’s thinking to existing activities, programs, and research questions • Working from intended outcomes to inputs • Creates a forum for new ideas or concepts Oregon Department of Education 2010

  27. Logic Model: Planning (Suggestion Only) • Define the situation • Identify intended outcomes • Identify external influences • Decide desirable outputs (products, services) • Decide inputs (investment) • Plan the Evaluation Oregon Department of Education 2010

  28. Perkins Continuous Improvement Cycle Oregon Department of Education 2010

  29. Build Readiness • Identify and enlist members of planning team • Develop a shared vision of success in the district among members of the planning team • Develop a common vision of the need & ability to make a difference in student achievement • Develop staff commitment to implementing changes to bring about improvement Oregon Department of Education 2010

  30. Collect and Analyze Data • Conduct a systematic and comprehensive analysis of data • Review goals from previous plan(s) against actual performance to determine impact of efforts • Interpret the data to determine trends toward meeting your goals Oregon Department of Education 2010

  31. Data Analysis Questions • What does the data say? • What additional questions need answers? • Is there enough data to make informed decisions? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  32. Data Analysis Questions (cont.) • Are the data interconnected? • Do you have the capacity to look across sources? • Where is this data coming from? • Are certain programs, schools, populations contributing more than others? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  33. Set SMART Objectives Based on Data • Consider objectives most likely to move students from their current achievement to achievement that meets the 2012-2013 goal Oregon Department of Education 2010

  34. SMART Goals • Specific • Measurable • Attainable • Results-focused/Realistic • Timely Oregon Department of Education 2010

  35. Specific • Identify who is involved • Identify what will be accomplished • Identify a location • Establish a time frame • Identify requirements and constraints • Identify specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal Oregon Department of Education 2010

  36. Measurable • Establish concrete criteria for measuring progress toward the attainment of each goal you set • How much? • How many? • How will you know when it is accomplished? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  37. Attainable • Can you achieve the goal? • Will it help to break it down into small steps? • What opportunities can you leverage? • What difficulties must you overcome? Oregon Department of Education 2010

  38. Results-focused/Realistic • Represent something toward which you are both willing and able to work • Represent substantial progress Oregon Department of Education 2010

  39. Timely • Establish target dates • Start time • End time • Milestones Oregon Department of Education 2010

  40. SMART Goals and Objectives From the Association of College and Research Libraries http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/about/sections/is/webarchive/smartobjectives/writingmeasurable.cfm Oregon Department of Education 2010

  41. Goals and Objectives • Revising goals into measurable objectives will assist you in planning activities, and upon completion of those activities, determining their success Oregon Department of Education 2010

  42. Goals • The “why,” to explain the reasoning behind doing something • A statement that explains what you wish to accomplish • Where you want/need to be at the end of your journey • Sets the fundamental, long-range direction Oregon Department of Education 2010

  43. Objectives • Break down the broader goal into its smaller parts – milestones • May provide guidelines for how the goal can be accomplished • Can be Program Objectives or Supporting Objectives Oregon Department of Education 2010

  44. Program Objectives • Specific statements that explain what will be accomplished in order to fulfill larger goals • Measurable level of achievement • Purpose • Provide clear expectations • Guide and help organize activities • Provide basis for evaluation Oregon Department of Education 2010

  45. Supporting Objectives • Describe what needs to be accomplished in order to fulfill program objectives Oregon Department of Education 2010

  46. Evaluating an Objective/Goal • Team 1: Keep AS MANY BALLOONS AS YOU CAN in the air for 1minute • Team 2: Keep ALL BALLOONS in the air for 1 minute Oregon Department of Education 2010

  47. Evaluating an Objective/Goal (cont.) What do the balloons represent? Projects Products Services Oregon Department of Education 2010

  48. SMART Goals/Objectives – Value • When a goal/objective is vague • Team members may always feel successful • Mediocrity may be acceptable • The team may not feel the need to strive for excellence Oregon Department of Education 2010

  49. SMART Goals/Objectives – Value (cont.) • When a goal/objective is not attainable • Frustration • Lack of motivation • Feeling of not being supported • Lack of will to maintain efforts Oregon Department of Education 2010

  50. Ways to Make Objectives Effective • Establish clear objectives (SMART) • Collaborate on objective setting to avoid confusion and misunderstanding • Promote group planning on how the team will accomplish its objectives Oregon Department of Education 2010