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Arthritis Foundation Exercise and Aquatic Programs

Arthritis Foundation Exercise and Aquatic Programs. Arthritis…. The term arthritis literally means “inflammation of a joint” but is used to refer to over 100 rheumatic diseases that are characterized by problems in and around joints. Demographics… .

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Arthritis Foundation Exercise and Aquatic Programs

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  1. Arthritis Foundation Exercise and Aquatic Programs

  2. Arthritis… • The term arthritis literally means “inflammation of a joint” but is used to refer to over 100 rheumatic diseases that are characterized by problems in and around joints.

  3. Demographics… • In 2005- 66 million (nearly 1 in 3 adults) in America have doctor-diagnosed arthritis or chronic joint symptoms. • Overall, women are affected more often than men. • Arthritis is the most prevalent chronic health problem • The leading cause of disability among Americans over the age of 15. • Arthritis is second only to heart disease as a cause of work disability. • Half of American’s with arthritis don’t think that anything can be done to help them.

  4. Target Audience • There are over 100 different kinds of arthritis. • Symptoms and severity may vary greatly. • Periods of lessening and worsening symptoms. • Some class members may use a wheelchair, others may prefer to sit for exercise, others may be able to stand up and do floor exercises. • People in class will change and improve.

  5. History of the Arthritis Foundation Programs • Developed 1986 • Community-based, non-clinical program, designed to promote social and mental well-being • Does NOT replace prescribed regimen of therapeutic exercise • Revised 1987, 1993, 1999 • Name change in 2005 with additional exercise routines.

  6. Goals of the Program (general) • To provide participant with an enjoyable, safe exercise program. • To improve self-image and self-esteem through increased physical well-being. • To encourage positive social interaction among participants. • To decrease stress, depression and isolation. • To maintain or improve certain physical parameters. • To improve performance of daily activities. • To increase participant’s awareness of arthritis exercise principles, joint protection principles, and relaxation techniques and provide participants with methods for incorporating these self-care skills into the home environment.

  7. Increased Frequency of exercise Increased frequency of relaxation Decreased pain Increased self-efficacy Outcomes from the Arthritis Foundation Programs

  8. Three Types of Exercise • Range of Motion- To help maintain normal joint movement, relieve stiffness and improve flexibility. • Strengthening- To maintain or increase strength. • Endurance- To help strengthen the heart, and improve overall stamina and fitness.

  9. Specific Physical Goals... • To relieve stiffness, pain, fatigue • To restore or maintain joint ROM • To increase flexibility of the structures surrounding the joint • To increase or maintain muscle strength • To improve posture • To improve balance and coordination • To increase endurance

  10. Program Components • ROM exercises • Strengthening • Endurance • Weight-bearing • Balance and Coordination • Posture and Body Mechanics • Body Awareness • Breathing exercises • Relaxation • Health Education • Practical tips • Movement Activities • Promote Self-Care & Self-Esteem

  11. Let’s M-O- V-E

  12. You Can!Steps to Healthier Aging

  13. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging In the past, exercise generally has been considered inappropriate for frail or very aged older individuals. The past decade has seen an accumulation of data that dispels the myths of futility and now provides reassurance of the safety of exercise. Position Stand: Exercise & Physical Activity for Older Adults, 1998 American Academy of Sports Medicine

  14. Modifiable Risk Factors for Oregon Older Adults, 2001

  15. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging • Designed for congregate meal sites & senior centers • 20-30 minute lesson plans for 12 weeks • Tips & Tasks sheets to take home • National network & sharing

  16. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging Requirements • Program facilitator or leader • Additional volunteers • Small budget for step counters, demonstration foods, duplication • Identified places for older adults to walk

  17. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging Additional Factors for Success • Reminder system • Set of group goals • Calendar with class schedule & special events • Link with Farmers Market • Use students • Share individual successes • Avoid mid-day heat

  18. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging Evidence • Initial Pilot Study • 80% successfully wore step counters & kept regular logs • 10 Grant-Funded Sites: PA, CA, OK, MI, IL, FL, MA, WI, VA, WA • Varying income, ethnicity, live-alone, ages, urban/rural • Programs offered at senior centers, meal programs, recreation centers, community centers

  19. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging Significant Outcomes •  daily intake of fruits, vegetables, calcium-rich & fiber-rich foods, fluids • stage of change for healthy eating & physical activity • Average 33% increase in number of daily steps •  pace, stairs climbed, blocks walked, days active •  time sitting down •  Timed Up and Go

  20. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging Sign up as a partner to receive free program guide and materials at: www.aoa.gov/youcan

  21. You Can! Steps to Healthier Aging Jennifer Mead Health Promotion/Disease Prevention DHS – Seniors & People with Disabilities 971-673-1035 or 503-945-6412 jennifer.mead@state.or.us

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