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Brussels, March 2007

Brussels, March 2007

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Brussels, March 2007

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  1. Communicating Moderation & Responsibility in the Consumption of Wine Prepared for M.E.P Dra. Edite Estrela Brussels, March 2007

  2. CEEV - “Comité Vins” • Comite Vin has taken the lead role in developing the EU Wine Sector Strategy for Responsible Consumption on behalf of the EU Wine Industry and Copa-Cogeca • Representative body of theEU Industry and Trade in Wines - 24 national associations • still wines, aromatised wines, sparkling wines, liqueur wines and other vine products. • Our companies produce and sell the large majority of wines in Europe. • more than 7.000 companies, mainly S&M enterprises. • More than 90% of EU wine exports. With more than 4,5 billion € annual exports, the EU Wine industry contributes to a surplus of 2 billion € to the EU balance of trade. • CEEV aims to promote the position of Wine Culture in Europe and all around the world and the sustainable development of the sector: • savoir-vivre , responsible moderate consumption, quality, competitiveness, and balance between tradition and the future.

  3. EU WINE SECTOR COMMON POSITION* • Enforcement of current laws and regulations with a regional (Member State) approach to resolving grave problems • Education in the broadest sense of “life-skills”, to create cultural change in the approach to Alcohol and to reduce Alcohol related harm across the population and among young people in particular. • Providing citizens with relevant and accurate information to allow them to make responsible decisions. • Recognizing and respecting the regional differences in culture and consumption of Alcohol when seeking to introduce effective measures which have been independently evaluated and agreed in a transparent process. * Agreed between CEEV and Copa-Cogeca 23-02-2006

  4. EU Wine Sector - Program PRINCIPLES COMMITMENT COMMON MESSAGE WINE INFORMATION COUNCIL EDUCATION “ART’S DE VIVRE” EUROPEAN WINE COMMUNICATION STANDARDS

  5. Committed Organisations • ITALY • FEDERVINI • UNIVINI • LUXEMBOURG • Féderation Luxembourgeoise • MALTA • Malta Wines and Vines Association • PORTUGAL • AEVP • FEVIN • SLOVANIA • Union for Viticulture and Enology Slovenia • SPAIN • FEV • ANEV • UCEVE • SWITZERLAND • Association Suisse des Vins • UK • WSA • CYPRUS • Association of Wine Producers • EUROPE • GLEVE, • Copa-Cogeca Wine Group • FRANCE • EGVF, France • FFVA, France • GERMANY • VDS • BWSI • VDW • GREECE • Greek Wine Federation • HOLLAND • KVNW, Holland • HUNGARY • Hungarian Wine Federation

  6. Presented to : • Comissario Kyprianou (DG Sanco) • DG Sanco (R.Madelin) • Comissaria Ficher Boel (DG Agri) • DG Agri – L.Hoelgaard • DG Agri 3 (R.Mildon) • HIAP Expert Conference, Kuopio • President, OIV Commission IV “Safety and Health” • DG OIV (F.Castelucci) • Copa-Cogeca (JL.Piton/R.Nickernig) • CEPS • FIVS • AIDV

  7. EU Wine Sector - Principles • HISTORY, HERITAGE AND SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS. • EU is World Leader - in terms of both production and consumption. • Wine has been a part of European life and culture since time immemorial • It is a stand-bearer of the history and diversity of European cultures of savoir-vivre and eating habits, based on variety and appreciation of tastes and flavours. • Wines have a major social, economic and environmental dimension in Europe. • Essential economic activity in many European regions, involving over 3 million producers and employees in companies downstream. • Wine contributes towards a flourishing tourist business, particularly through its unparalleled participation in maintaining the countryside and environment.

  8. EU Wine Sector - Principles • USE, ABUSE, MISUSE… DRINKING PATTERNS MATTERS !!!. • Problems related to alcoholic beverage consumption are due to the abuse and/or misuse by a minority: this is no different from other food products or goods. • Responsible consumption patterns are perfectly compatible with a healthy lifestyle and consumed in moderation by adults is not a health hazard or a point of social concern. • In order to measure the magnitude of health problems related to inappropriate alcohol consumption, many factors other than per capita consumption need to be taken into consideration, such as drinking patterns and regional differences. • The very different drinking patterns in different areas of the world are part of a very different traditional lifestyle. There are actual relevant differences in terms of drinking patterns in the EU.

  9. EU Wine Sector - Principles Adult per capita alcohol consumption (pure alcohol per person per year – incl. unrecorded consumption) Source: World Health Organization (2005).

  10. EU Wine Sector - Principles The global distribution of patterns of drinking (drinks per occasion) Source: World Health Organization (2005).

  11. EU Wine Sector - Principles • USE, ABUSE, MISUSE… DRINKING PATTERNS MATTERS !!!. • While the increase of misuse, especially amongst young people in certain countries, is of concern, both binge drinking and the amount of alcohol consumed at each drinking occasion is considerably lower in the predominantly wine drinking countries (*) • The existence of more responsible drinking patterns, linked to traditional wine producing countries, must be acknowledged. • (*) Hibell, B. et al.The ESPAD Report 2003, Alcohol and other drug use among students in 25 European countries. The Swedish Council for information on alcohol and other drugs, the Pompidou Group at the Council of Europe, 2004).

  12. EU Wine Sector - Principles • EVOLUTION OF WINE CONSUMPTION IN THE EU. • According to European Commission’s statistics, while overall consumption of wine has decreased in Europe, increasingly Europeans are purchasing wines of higher quality and are consuming in a more responsible and moderate way. • Wines are consumed in Europe by adults, associated with diet and gastronomy, in a responsible and moderate way, in a home or restaurant environment.

  13. EU Wine Sector - Principles CONSUMPTION BY TYPE OF WINE Source: DG AGRI C3 - European Commission THE CONSUMPTION OF WINE HAS DECREASED BY 15 MILLION HL OVER THE PAST 20 YEARS, WITH MORE THAN 20% DECREASE IN THE TRADITIONAL MAIN PRODUCING COUNTRIES SINCE 1996.

  14. EU Wine Sector - Principles • DRINKING PATTERNS MATTERS: THE CULTURAL FACTOR IS CENTRAL. • When assessing the magnitude of health problems related to alcohol misuse in Europe, and looking for effective solutions: • indicators must encompass the whole spectrum of health and behavioural effects and regional variations. • it is essential to analyse drinking patterns/regional differences, • more research is needed to better understand, what, why and how people drink. • best practice in terms of moderate responsible drinking patterns should be promoted as a social norm.

  15. EU Wine Sector - Principles • The EU Wine Sector is deeply concerned about key problems related to alcoholic beverage abuse or misuse, in particular: • Drink / drive • Pregnancy • Alcohol related harm / abuse and violence • Underage drinking • Binge drinking by youth • The EU Wine sector must be socially responsible in its approach to maintaining a sustainable business by: • encouraging the consumption of wine in a moderate and responsible way as a cultural / social norm; • contributing to reduce alcohol abuse and help young people and adults make enlightened, responsible decisions about drinking.

  16. CEEV - Principles • KEY ELEMENTS FOR EFFICIENT SUSTAINABLE INTERVENTIONS to tackle the harmful consequences of inappropriate consumption: • Support the enforcement of the existing laws and regulations with a regional approach to resolving serious problems. • Solutions should be carefully targeted at both reducing abuse / misuse or harm to others and at promoting responsible drinking patterns. • Local approachrespecting regional differences in culture and consumption patterns. No single policy approach can succeed across Europe. • Provide citizens with relevant and accurate information by appropriate, effective proportionate means to allow them to make responsible decisions. • Education in the broadest sense of “life-skills” to promote sensible drinking patterns and cultural change in the approach to alcohol beverages and reduce alcohol related harm. Focus on encouraging responsible drinking patterns/moderate consumption as a social norm. • Develop Co-responsible partnership between public authorities and stakeholders in curbing irresponsible consumption.

  17. EU Wine Sector - Commitment • The European Wine sector currently isa, and wants to be a stronger, PARTNER in contributing with effective solutions to tackle problems of alcohol misuse related harm. • The EU Wine sector will take a leadership role to: • Communicate moderation and responsibility in the sensible consumption of wines; • Contribute towards preventing abusive and/or excessive consumption of alcoholic drinks; • Cooperate effectively with the competent authorities and other relevant stakeholders (1) in the prevention of abuse or misuse of wine. • (1) Stakeholders include educators, consumer organizations, medical and health professionals as well as industry organizations of distributors, off-trade retail and HORECA.

  18. EU Wine Sector - Program • The EU Wine Sector is committed to launch and implement as from 2006 a European Program working to promote sensible drinking patterns and reduce alcohol abuse/misuse related harm, specifically by: • Disseminate a common “moderation” message – to be developed based on the WHO message • Proactively encourage a sharing of “best-practice” across organisations • Work with local authorities to develop “arts de vivre” (life-skills) • Promote specific “Wine Communication Standards” for commercial communications.

  19. EU Wine Sector - Program PRINCIPLES COMMITMENT COMMON MESSAGE WINE INFORMATION COUNCIL EDUCATION “ART’S DE VIVRE” EUROPEAN WINE COMMUNICATION STANDARDS

  20. Common Message • Objective • The EU Wine sector must be socially responsible in its approach to • maintaining a sustainable business by • communicating moderation and responsibility in the consumption of wine as a cultural / social norm; • contributing to reduce alcohol abuse and help young people and adults make enlightened, responsible decisions about drinking. • Methodology • Work with Government to enforce the national laws as appropriate • Support initiatives to reduce alcohol related harm • Active education of consumers to encourage cultural change in the approach to consuming alcohol, making moderation fashionable • Communicate a common message reinforcing the cultural and social aspects of moderation as part of a healthy lifestyle

  21. Common Message • HISTORY • History of wine • Culture of wine • PRODUCT • Natural product • Strict regulation in wine making • Socio Economic dimension of wine sector • MODERATION • Sensible consumption • Wine, Diet and health • Use and Misuse • Impact of Abuse • WINE DRINKING AND THE LAW • Knowing and understanding the law • Drinking and driving • Minimum Purchasing age • Implications of not complying • DRINKING PATTERNS • Trends of production • Trends of consumption Message Content

  22. Common Message Development • The Common Message for communication is not finalised, • Due to the importance of this piece of communication it must be shared and agreed with many important stakeholders – inside and outside the Wine Sector – to gain broad acceptance, • The Common Message will be published in May 2007. Common Message

  23. EU Wine Information Council • The Wine Information Council’s mission will be to: • Share “best practices” across EU Wine sector organisations in the member states • Develop process and structure for a central Wine Information database to: • Coordinate information flows between the various national and local Wine and Health Associations, ensuring that information is commonly available for use by any stakeholder. • Consolidate all relevant information based on sound science. • Stimulate additional research carried out by independent credible researchers on aspects of interest or concern, and to coordinate independent education relevant to specific areas of the population

  24. EU Wine Information Council Development • The EU Wine Information Council is currently in development and agreements are being forged with key Partners, • On an EU level these Partners include OIV, EFRD, AIM and others • A first meeting of the EU W.I.C. took place in February 2007 to establish the basis of cooperation between national Social Aspects/Wine & Health Organisations. • The EU W.I.C. is planned to go “on-line” in May 2007. EU Wine Information Council

  25. Education “Arts de Vivre” • Teaching “Arts de Vivre” programme: education formoderate and sensible wine consumption as part of a healthy lifestyle. • Objective. • Active education of consumers to encourage cultural change in the approach to consuming alcohol, making moderation fashionable • Educate consumers who appreciate wine to do so moderately and responsibly as part of a healthy lifestyle • Familiarise them with the risks and benefits of moderate consumption of wine to allow them to make informed and responsible decisions.

  26. Education “Arts de Vivre” • Methodology • Two complementary tools with a multiplying impact throughout the whole • wine chain network: • Disseminate the common “moderation” message throughout the whole EU Wine professional network: • prominent display of material in all visitor reception areas (oenotourism) • professional and inter-professional organizations and regional or national organisations which promote wine • inclusion of the Common message in all promotional information, brochures, websites, and other significant media developed and used by the EU Wine sector. • through sharing “best-practice” and pressuring national associations to implement programmes, working with local authorities as appropriate.

  27. Education “Arts de Vivre” • “Arts de Vivre” Presentations • A wide ranging education programme, in conjunction with local authorities, for consumers, parents, teachers, and young people using “experts” from the local community, companies and producers • Use a common presentation including the Common Message. • Key areas to communicate • Moderation and responsibility in the consumption of wine, its association with diet, and the risks associated with abusive consumption (binge drinking, pregnancy). • the legal environment (minimum purchase age, drink/drive and maximum Beverage Alcohol Concentration)

  28. “Arts de Vivre” Education Program Development • The “Arts de Vivre” Education Programis currently in development and the implementation will be in phases: • Materials for Wine Sector Communication of the Common Message by May 2007 • “Arts de Vivre” Education Presentation (in PP presentation format) by end May 2007. • “Arts de Vivre”Website on-line by end May 2007 Education “Arts de Vivre”

  29. Wine Communication Standards Objective The European wine sector is a strong advocate of moderate and responsible consumption: “common sense” must govern all forms of commercial communications to current and potential consumers Tools. Reinforce the traditions of Wine presentation, communication and availability to consumers in terms of promoting moderation and responsibility in its consumption. The manner in which Wines are traditionally presented, communicated and made available to consumers induce moderation and responsibility in their consumption. Consequently, the evolution of the presentation and communication of wine has focused on the origins, heritage, making, and serving of the product in a dignified and social manner. Communication must not be targeted to underage consumers, or imply benefits that do not exist, or communication that is less than appropriate.

  30. Wine Communication Standards Wine Communication Standards Development • The Wine Communication Standards are currently in development and the first phase of research has been completed at the end of January 2007, • The Wine Communication Standards will be published in May 2007

  31. WORK IN PROGRESS – BASED ON CEEV APPROVED STRATEGY Monitoring implementation: Key Performance Indicators • Global performance indicators of the Program* • Active involvement in implementing the Program of 100% of the EU Wine professional sector by end of 2009 (75% by end 2008) • 50% awareness amongst the targeted wine consumers of the common message of moderate consumption of wine and preventing abusive and/or excessive consumption of alcoholic drinks; • Number of European / national / local stakeholders involved: • - at the time of setting up the programme (Sept 06) • - by the end of 2008 • - by end of 2009 • Increase ( % ) in the rate of moderate / sensible consumption of wine in the total consumption of wines in the EU (based on the research by the WIC concerning evolution of drinking patterns of wine in Europe). • * The Global performance indicators are indicative and must still • be agreed to as objectives by the EU Wine Sector

  32. EU Alcohol & Health Forum EU Alcohol & Health Forum • The Wine Sector will be an active and participant in the EU Alcohol & Health Forum • 1st Round Table – 6th March 2007 • 1st Plenary of Forum – 7th June 2007 • Committed to effective contribution to the reduction of Alcohol related harm.

  33. Links with the Wine CMO Reform • The sustainable development EU Wine sector requires a consistent European Wine Policy which will give coherence to different European initiatives (agricultural, competitiveness, sustainable development, health and consumer protection). • This European Wine Policy should have, as an essential pillar, the defense of the place of Wine and the Wine sector in our society through the promotion of responsibility and moderation in the consumption of wines. To do soappropriate BRIDGES must be built between the EU Health and consumer protection policies and the CMOin order to allow for a consistent implementation of the EU Wine sector commitment.

  34. Links with the Wine CMO Reform  EU Wine Policymust redeploy appropriate resources to promote moderation and responsibility in the consumption of wines a positive major contribution to the protection of European consumers and the public health. These measures must be developed by an effective partnership between the Community, the MS, the regions, the Wine sector. • The EU Health policy must recognize and endorse the role of the promotion of moderate responsible best practice / less harmful drinking patterns amongst adult people as a social norm, in partnership with all relevant stakeholders. This interventions should both target the risk and protective factors with the aim of promoting effective behavioural change among adult consumers. P A R T N E R S H I P

  35. A commitment of effective contribution to the reduction of Alcohol related harm: • Broad Based Education • Industry Self-regulation • Science Based Information