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Homo empathicus : Dissecting the ‘warm glow ’ of prosocial behavior

Homo empathicus : Dissecting the ‘warm glow ’ of prosocial behavior

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Homo empathicus : Dissecting the ‘warm glow ’ of prosocial behavior

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  1. Homo empathicus:Dissecting the ‘warm glow’ of prosocial behavior 2014 Van der Gaag Symposium 24 June 2014 Introduction

  2. Program 10.30. Welcome 11.00. Marco van Leeuwen: Giving in the Golden Age 11.45. Paul van Lange: Trust: the key to prosocial behavior 12.30. Lunch 13.30. Sara Konrath: Genes, hormones and prosociality 14.15. Joan Grusec: Prosocial behavior from a domains-of-socialization perspective 15.00. Tea/coffee 15.30. JorgMassen: Evolution of pro-sociality 16.15. Discussion 18.30 Dinner at Restaurant ‘In de Waag’ Introduction

  3. Whatmotivatesprosocial behavior? Introduction to the symposium René Bekkers (VU Amsterdam) Introduction

  4. Pure altruism Impurealtruism Introduction

  5. Introduction

  6. Introduction

  7. Introduction

  8. Wall Street is anearlyexample of Dutch philanthropy Introduction

  9. “Stuyvesant called upon the 43 richest residents of New Amsterdam to provide funding to fix up the ailing Fort Amsterdam and to construct a stockade across the island to prevent attacks from the north, while it took New Amsterdam's most oppressed inhabitants -- slave labor from the Dutch West India Company -- to actually build the wall.” Russell Shorto – The Island at the Center of the World Introduction

  10. The Rijksmuseum (1885) Introduction

  11. The concert hall (1886) Introduction

  12. Introduction

  13. Charity Introduction

  14. φιλανθρωπια Introduction

  15. Toomany research questions Which elements make people glow warmer when they give? Which of these ingredients burns up fastest? Where does the ‘joy of giving’ come from? How are different motivations connected to different sorts of prosocial behavior? How are motivations for prosocial behavior contingent upon historical events? What do empirical regularities in current manifestations of prosocial behavior among humans and other species tell us about the evolutionary origins of prosociality? What implications do various motivations have for public policy and the production and organization of public goods in practice? Introduction

  16. What is the ‘Warm Glow’? Introduction

  17. Why do peoplegive? Peoplegive more (often) when • There is a clearneedneed • They are beingaskedsolicitation • Costs are lower, and benefits are highercosts/benefits • They care about the recipientsaltruism • Theyreceivesocialbenefitsreputation • Theyreceivepsychologicalbenefitsself-rewards • The cause matches theirvaluesvalues • Donations are perceived to beefficientefficacy Source: Bekkers, R. & Wiepking, P. (2011). ‘A Literature Review of Empirical Studies of Philanthropy: Eight Mechanisms that Drive Charitable Giving’. Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, 40(5): 924-973. Available at www.understandingphilanthropy.com Introduction

  18. Why do peoplegive? HERE IS THE WARM GLOW Peoplegive more (often) when • There is a clearneedneed • They are beingaskedsolicitation • Costs are lower, benefits are highercosts/benefits • They care about the recipientsaltruism • Theyreceivesocialbenefitsreputation • Theyreceivepsychologicalbenefitsself-rewards • The cause matches theirvaluesvalues • Donations are perceived as efficientefficacy Introduction AND HERE

  19. Attention to altruism Mechanisms studied in articlescoveredby the 2011 literaturereview of philanthropy Introduction

  20. Attention to altruism Number of articlesrelative to total per decade Introduction

  21. Who’swatching? Choices of 302 high school studentsparticipating in a dictator game withcharities as recipients in a nationwidesurvey experiment (Spring 2009) Introduction

  22. The power of suggestion Amountsdonatedby 6,672 Utrecht University alumni in April-May 2008 Introduction

  23. A price is not a price +90% +46% Proportion of rewarddonated in a dictator game withcharities as recipients by 518 GINPS04 respondents (Source: Bekkers, 2006) Introduction

  24. The remaining program 11.00. Marco van Leeuwen: Giving in the Golden Age 11.45. Paul van Lange: Trust: the key to prosocial behavior 12.30. Lunch 13.30. Sara Konrath: Genes, hormones and prosociality 14.15. Joan Grusec: Prosocial behavior from a domains-of-socialization perspective 15.00. Tea/coffee 15.30. JorgMassen: Evolution of pro-sociality 16.15. Discussion 18.30 Dinner at Restaurant ‘In de Waag’ Introduction

  25. Group discussion • How do yousee the field of research on prosocial behavior in other disciplines? • What do youtake home fromtoday? Introduction

  26. Distinctions we have heard • One concept: prosocial • Twoaltruism parameters, pure and impure • Threegroups of determinants (11 in total) • The fourWhy’s (Tinbergen) • Fivedomains of socialization • Eight mechanisms in giving Introduction

  27. Toomany research questions • Which elements make people glow warmer when they give? • Which of these ingredients burns up fastest? • Where does the ‘joy of giving’ come from? • How are different motivations connected to different sorts of prosocial behavior? Introduction

  28. Toomany research questions • How are motivations for prosocial behavior contingent upon historical events? • What do empirical regularities in current manifestations of prosocial behavior among humans and other species tell us about the evolutionary origins of prosociality? • What implications do various motivations have for public policy and the production and organization of public goods in practice? Introduction