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Self-Regulated Learning and Its Role in Tutoring

Self-Regulated Learning and Its Role in Tutoring

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Self-Regulated Learning and Its Role in Tutoring

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  1. Self-Regulated Learning and Its Role in Tutoring Jan Collins Eaglin and Laura Woodward Tutoring Institute Academic Success Center April 13, 2006 Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  2. Learning Styles A particular way in which the mind receives and processes information. You may have a particular way that you like to learn. This may be different from that of your students. Different theoretical bases for learning styles Entwistle Soloman Gardner Felder http://www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb.html The problem with learning styles is that there is an assumption that a student whose learning style does not match their professor’s style cannot learn in that class. Student Learning Results from More than Just their Intelligence Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  3. We Can Improve Student Memory of our Course Material • Tutoring by using only the standard lecturer style promotes • Shallow learning • Learning by rote. • Test anxiety • Reduced memory • Tutoring by using multiple approaches can help. • VERBALLY and VISUALLY Stores in different parts of the brain • BY ASKING QUESTIONS Promotes deeper thinking • USING REAL WORLD EXAMPLES Framing helps motivation • CHUNKING Helps students to organize • BY BEING SELECTIVE Helps students focus Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  4. Self-regulated Learning • How students become masters of their own learning processes. • View of the academic learning as something students do for themselves, rather than something which is done to or for them. • Proactive activity, requiring self-initiated motivational and behavioral processes as well as meta-cognitive ones Zimmerman, 1986 Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  5. Skill Will Self-regulation Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  6. Characteristics of Self-regulated Learners • Think about yourself in that very difficult class you had with a Tutor who didn’t teach the way you wanted to learn. • Write down the things about you that helped you to succeed. Write it down. Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  7. Characteristics of Self-regulated Learners • Motivated • Setting goals • Active • Monitoring • Controlling their learning • Adaptive Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  8. Strategies of Self-regulated Learners • Think about yourself in that very difficult class you had with a Tutor who didn’t teach the way you wanted to learn, or a friend who succeeded in that situation. • What were the things that you did to help you succeed? • Discuss these with one other person. • Present the most important ones to the group. Discuss. Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  9. Cognitive strategies Rehearsal Elaboration Organization Meta-cognitive Forethought Monitoring Regulating Managing resources Strategies of Self-regulated Learners Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  10. Implementing Strategies • Time, effort into planning • Monitoring effort, time use and need for help • Choice to increase or decrease effort • Persistence • Regulating effort • Using extrinsic self-talk • Seeking help Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  11. Strategies • Self-monitoring • Comprehension monitoring Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  12. Self-regulated Learning Apathetic Somewhat motivated Motivated No skills Mediocre skills Some skills Self-regulated skills Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  13. Motivation InternalAbility ExternalLuck Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  14. Cultural Context • Stereotype threat can impair academic performance if the stereotype is negative. • Aronson, Fried and Good (2002) found that The African American students encouraged to view intelligence as malleable reported: • Greater enjoyment of the academic process • Greater academic engagement • And obtained higher grade point averages than their counterparts in two control groups. Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  15. Bernard Weiner's Attribution Theory Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  16. Self-efficacy • Control over one’s own functioning and events that affect one’s life. • It influences: • goals students set • commitment to those goals • learning strategies employed Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  17. Positive Attributions • What students believe caused their success or failure. • Productive • Applying effort • Using strategies • Unproductive • Low ability • Luck Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  18. Control Over Outcomes • Goal orientation • Learning • Goal is to understand the material. • “I appreciate a challenge.” • Performance • Goal is to perform well. • “If it takes a lot of effort, I must not be smart.” Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  19. Tutors As Academic Coaches • Help to build: • Self-efficacy • Positive attributions • Control over outcomes Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  20. What Can a Tutor Do to Help a Student? Taken from the webpage of Dr. Deborah L. Butler, University of British Columbia http://www.ecps.educ.ubc.ca/faculty/Butler/SCL.htm Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  21. What Can a Tutor Do to Help a Student? • Help students construct: • Learning about learning academic content • Strategies for analyzing tasks • Task-specific strategies and skills • Self-monitoring strategies Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  22. What Can a Tutor Do to Help a Student? • Assess the students’ ability to: • Adjust learning activities to reduce gaps between desired and actual performance. • Monitor outcomes associated with strategy use. • Self-evaluate by comparing progress against task criteria to generate judgments about how they are doing. • Interpret externally provided feedback. • Use feedback strategically to diagnose challenges and problem solve solutions. • Generate judgments about progress and make decisions that shape further learning activities. Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  23. What Can a Tutor Do to Help a Student? • Assess a student’s ability to analyze task demands. • Scrutinize assignments to extract: • The topic • Expected procedures • Required products • Marking criteria • Draw on meta-cognitive knowledge about the task. Academic Success Center (313)577-3165

  24. Self-regulated Learning • Tutors can help students by • Strategy instruction • Assessing how a student adapts through • Task analysis • Strategy use • Monitoring • Helping students improve their motivation. • Self-efficacy • Positive attributions • Control over outcomes Academic Success Center (313)577-3165