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ASL 1-2

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ASL 1-2

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  1. ASL 1-2 Unit 4 Lessons © 2010 Natasha Escalada-Westland Unit 4 Unit 4 1

  2. Unit FourFamily and Friends Unit Four Objectives To recognize and use gender distinction in ASL To understand and use contrastive structure To sign about family, friends and relationships To understand how ASL name signs are made To use pronoun signs appropriately Unit 4 Unit 4 2 Based on Master ASL Level One by Jason Zinza

  3. Lesson 1 Family Unit 4 Unit 4 3

  4. Ordinal Numbers First Second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Seventh Eighth Ninth Numbers that describe order, ordinal numbers, are twisted forward up to ninth. For tenth and up, sign the number then add a fingerspelled “th”. ASL does not use “nd” or “rd” as an ending for the larger ordinal numbers. For example, English uses 22nd but ASL uses 22th. For street names, the ending is sometimes just omitted. Unit 4 Unit 4 4

  5. Numbers: Ordinal and Listed Number Review. Practice signing each number sequence and sentence correctly. 1. His phone # is 555-0762 4. Everyday I go to 201 Swan Rd. 2. Their address is 655 S. 4th Ave. 5. I have a class at 312 Grant Rd. 3. We visited 4120 E. 23rd St. 6. Our teacher’s email is natasha.escaladawestland@tusd1.org With a partner, describe various dolls in the picture below by using ordinal numbers and small/large. Have your partner point to the doll you are describing. Unit 4

  6. To camp Unit 4 Unit 4 6

  7. To play Unit 4 Unit 4 7

  8. Sometimes (used for frequency of an event) 0 ++ ++++ Never Sometimes Always Unit 4 Unit 4 8

  9. Sizes Unit 4 Unit 4 9

  10. Family Unit 4 Unit 4 10

  11. Like, same as Unit 4 Unit 4 11

  12. Only(alone) Unit 4 Unit 4 12

  13. All, Everybody(quantity, how many) ++++ ++ 0 all some none All together, added up Unit 4 Unit 4 13

  14. Child Unit 4 Unit 4 14

  15. Children Unit 4 Unit 4 15

  16. To have Unit 4 Unit 4 16

  17. Parents Unit 4 Unit 4 17

  18. People Unit 4 Unit 4 18

  19. How Many Altogether? Headcount. Ask a partner how many members are in each family. Your partner will respond using the information below. When done, switch roles and repeat the exercise. Sentence examples are provided. A. B. • 8 people • 3 people • 11 people • 5 people • 16 people • 4 people • 6 people • 9 people • 2 people • 7 people ? Unit 4 Unit 4 19

  20. How Many?: Families How many? What can you say about each family? Following the example sentence, explain: • How many children are there in each family? • Who are the hearing and Deaf members of each family? Smith Family: All Deaf Duggar Family Unit 4 Unit 4 20 Clark Family: Child Deaf Alvarez Family: Parents Deaf

  21. Lesson 2 More Family and Relatives Unit 4 Unit 4 21

  22. Family, Relatives Unit 4 Unit 4 22

  23. Mother, Father, Parents, Baby, Son, Daughter, Child Unit 4 Unit 4 23

  24. Brother, Sister, Aunt, Uncle, Cousin, Grandma, Grandpa Spell “great” Grandparents, plural form Gender neutral form Unit 4 Unit 4 24

  25. Other Family Signs Adopt/adopted Step (mom, dad…) Half (brother, sister) Unit 4 Unit 4 25

  26. “Have Deaf?”: Relatives Have Deaf? The expression have deaf is a common way to ask whether there are Deaf people in your family. If the answer is yes, it is polite to explain who is Deaf in the family. Ask a partner if he or she has any Deaf members in the family, following the example. Your partner will respond using the information shown. Switch roles and repeat the exercise when done. A. B1. B2. • Yes, my mother is Deaf. • No, there are no Deaf people in my family. • Yeah, I have a Deaf cousin. • Yes, my brother is Deaf. • Yes, my Aunt Claire is Deaf. • Nobody’s Deaf in my family, but my grandfather is hard of hearing. • Yeah, I have a cousin who’s Deaf. • Yes, my sister and brother are Deaf. • All my family is Deaf. ? No, nobody’s Deaf. Yes, my _____ is Deaf. Are there any Deaf people in your family? Unit 4 Unit 4 26

  27. Building Sentences: Relatives Building blocks. Create complete sentences using information from each column. An example is shown. • Column A • sister • cousin • parents • brother • friend Column B Deaf hearing hard-of-hearing wants likes Column C born from lives in works to study Column D sign language California restaurant Canada Arizona My Deaf friend lives in Mexico. Unit 4 Unit 4 27

  28. Natasha’s family. Ask a partner questions about the family tree in complete ASL sentences. Below are some possible questions. Mary Harry • Is Natasha’s brother named Max? • Who are her grandma and aunt? • Does Natasha have a cousin? • Is Natasha’s entire family small, medium or large? • Who are Natasha’s other relatives? Maggie Richard Larry Pauline Ted Natasha Unit 4 Unit 4 28 Max Buffy

  29. Lesson 3 Gender Related and Relationship Descriptions Unit 4 Unit 4 29

  30. Gender Distinction in ASL Masculine MASL p. 128 Feminine You may have noticed by now that ASL distinguishes gender aspects of signs by locating a sign in either the masculine or feminine areas of the face, as seen in the illustration. Depending where you place the sign cousin, it means female cousin or male cousin. What other signs do you know with gender distinction? Unit 4 Unit 4 30

  31. More Gender-Related Signs Man Woman Boy Girl Unit 4 Unit 4 31

  32. To be dead, gone, missing Unit 4 Unit 4 32

  33. Dead Unit 4

  34. To marry Unit 4 Unit 4 34

  35. To divorce Unit 4 Unit 4 35

  36. Older, tall, adult Unit 4 Unit 4 36

  37. Younger, short Unit 4 Unit 4 37

  38. Compound Signs MASL p. 133 Many of the signs you recently learned are compound signs, which are two separate signs combined to make an additional meaning. Combining the signs for mother and father creates parents, and girl plus same (in its older form) means sister. When using compounds, sign each portion quickly and smoothly in one motion. Can you think of other compound signs you know? ? parents sister Unit 4 Unit 4 38

  39. Gender • Gender distinction. Sign each sentence in ASL, using the correct form of the gender-specific signs as needed. • My cousin Joseph lives in Florida. • Her niece was born yesterday. • My sister married a man who has two daughters. • Our daughter is named Carrie. • I have a cousin named Tara. • My aunt and uncle are divorced • My nephew lives in Ohio with my sister. • My ASL teacher is a woman. • Our daughter’s name is Rebekah. niece nephew cousin (f) cousin (m) daughter son aunt uncle Unit 4 Unit 4 39

  40. Dialogues: Families • Dialogue. Create a dialogue with a partner in which family information is exchanged, including: • Asking about any Deaf members of the family: • Asking for and giving the names of at least three family members and their marital status; • Explaining whether one has older or younger siblings. Unit 4 Unit 4 40

  41. Lesson 4 Shoulder Shifting – Contrastive Structure Unit 4 Unit 4 41

  42. Shoulder Shifting“Eyes on ASL #8” There are three main uses for Shoulder-Shifting in ASL. In this section, you will use Shoulder-Shifting to ask and answer questions that incorporate more than one detail or piece of information. Using Shoulder-Shifting in this way is known as contrastive structure. This generally takes the place of “and.” Shoulder-Shifting is related to the concept of deixis in which the index finger points to a person or object which may or may not be visible. It is a way to distinguish several pieces of information in a signed sentence by slightly moving your head and shoulders in a different direction for each detail. Shoulder-Shifting is used for: contrasting: Multiple topics or pieces of information in the same sentence; comparing: What more than on person says or does; separating: More than on idea or concept in the same sentence; MASL p. 131 Unit 4 Unit 4 42

  43. Pets Unit 4 Unit 4 43

  44. but, different, “in contrast to” Unit 4 Unit 4 44

  45. Pratice Exercise – Contrastive Structure • Contrastive structure drill. Sign each of the following sentences, using contrastive structure for the information in italics. • They are: 1 man; 2 women. 8. My parents are divorced: • I have 2 cousins: Father lives in San Diego; • 1 Cousin named Sean; Mother lives in Phoenix. • 1 Cousin named Laura. 9. My: • I need: hot and cold water. Mother is Deaf; • I see: Girl; Boy Father is hearing; • I have: One brother; Two brothers are Deaf. • Two sisters. 10. She has: • His: Grandmother is deceased; One dog; • Grandfather is alive. Two cats; • My: Uncle is watching TV; Two older sisters. • Aunt is sleeping. Unit 4 Unit 4 45

  46. Contrastive Structure Shoulder-Shifting. Use contrastive structure to describe each illustration. 2 1 3 4 Unit 4 Unit 4 46

  47. Facial Expressions Facial expressions. Use Shoulder-Shifting with each pair of facial expressions. 1 2 3 4 Unit 4 Unit 4 47

  48. Lesson 5 Signing Age & Discussing Life Events Unit 4 Unit 4 48

  49. Teenager Unit 4 Unit 4 49

  50. To be young Unit 4 Unit 4 50