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ARIZONA Multi-Tier Behavior Support Tier 2 & Continuing Tier 1

ARIZONA Multi-Tier Behavior Support Tier 2 & Continuing Tier 1

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ARIZONA Multi-Tier Behavior Support Tier 2 & Continuing Tier 1

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  1. ARIZONAMulti-Tier Behavior SupportTier 2 & Continuing Tier 1 Chris Borgmeier, PhD Portland State University cborgmei@pdx.edu www.tier2pbis.pbworks.com

  2. Team Sharing • SHOW & TELL • Review SW-PBIS Implementation • TIPS meeting process • Successes • Surprises • Challenges/Questions

  3. Who is Responsible? TIPS II Training Manual (2013) www.uoecs.org

  4. Where in the Form would you place: • Staff will complete weekly fidelity checks • Three students are not meeting daily CICO goal • Parents are not signing CICO home report • ORF scores are too low for third graders • Plan for school board report

  5. Complete the MATTSelf-Assess Tier 2/3 • Go to www.pbisassessment.org • Enter your school code • Reference the MATT handouts to guide you through questions • Coaches Interview Guide (pp. 2-5) • Team Scoring Guide (pp. 6-10) • Enter scores into www.pbisassessment.org

  6. Tier 2 InterventionsCheck-In/Check-Out (CICO) Chris Borgmeier, PhD Portland State University cborgmei@pdx.edu www.tier2pbis.pbworks.com

  7. CICO within School-wide PBIS • All specialized interventions are more effective, and more durable, if they are done with school-wide behavioral expectations as a foundation. 5% ~15% Primary Prevention: School-/Classroom- Wide Systems for All Students, Staff, & Settings SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE behavior SUPPORT ~80% of Students

  8. Check-In/Check-OutResearch Support • CICO is an Evidence-Based Practice • At least 5 peer reviewed studies • At least 3 different researchers/settings • At least 20 different participants • Pre schools • Sandy Chafouleas, et al 2007 • Elementary Schools • Anne Todd et al in press • Sarah Fairbanks et al, 2007 • Amy Kauffman-Campbell, dissertation • Doug Cheney et al, 2006; 2007 • Leanne Hawken et al. 2007 • Filter et al., 2007 • Middle Schools • Leanne Hawken et al 2003 • Rob March et al 2002 • High Schools • Jessica Swain-Bradway, in progress

  9. OREGON2011-12CICO-SWISTier 2

  10. CICO-SWIS in Oregon2011-12

  11. Over 84% of CICO students succeeding!

  12. Questions about Tier 2 InterventionsSystems Considerations • What constitutes a Tier 2 Intervention? • An intervention that: • Serves multiple students at one time (15-25 student at once) • More efficient use of resources that 1 student at a time • Students can get started with almost immediately upon referral • Requires almost no legwork from referring staff to begin implementation of the intervention with a student • All school staff know about, understand their roll with, and know the referral process for • SYSTEMS NOTE: Resources Required: • If program is not self-sufficient… and requires significant organization by referring staff… it’s not a targeted intervention

  13. Major Features of Targeted Interventions • Intervention is continuously available • Rapid access to intervention (72 hr) • Very low effort by teachers • Consistent with school-wide expectations • Implemented by all staff/faculty in a school • Flexible intervention based on assessment • Functional Assessment • Adequate resources (admin, team) • weekly meeting, plus 10 hours a week • Student chooses to participate • Continuous monitoring for decision-making

  14. Why does CICO Work? • Improved structure • Prompts are provided throughout the day for correct behavior. • System for linking student with at least one positive adult. • Student chooses to participate. • Student is “set up for success” • First contact each morning is positive. • “Blow-out” days are pre-empted. • First contact each class period (or activity period) is positive. • Increase in contingent feedback • Feedback occurs more often. • Feedback is tied to student behavior. • Inappropriate behavior is less likely to be ignored or rewarded.

  15. Why does CICO Work? • Program can be applied in all school locations • Classroom, playground, cafeteria (anywhere there is a supervisor) • Elevated reward for appropriate behavior • Adult and peer attention delivered each target period • Adult attention (and tangible) delivered at end of day • Linking behavior support and academic support • For academic-based, escape-maintained problem behavior incorporate academic support • Linking school and home support • Provide format for positive student/parent contact • Program is organized to morph into a self-management system • Increased options for making choices • Increased ability to self-monitor performance/progress

  16. Morning Check-in Parent Feedback Regular Teacher Feedback Bi-weekly Progress Monitoring Meeting Afternoon Check-out Revise Program Student Referred for CICO BASIC CYCLE Check In Check Out (CICO) CICO Plan/ Initial Meeting Teach/Role Play Skills CICO Coordinator Summarizes Data For Decision Making Exit Program

  17. Logistics for Setting up a CICO program • 1. Faculty and staff commitment • Is problem behavior a major concern? • Are staff willing to commit 5 min per day? • Is CICO a reasonable option for us? • More than 5 students need extra support • CICO is designed to work with 10-12% of kids in a school • CICO typically “works” (50% reduction) with 67% of students. • CICO does NOT replace need for individualized supports. • Activity 1: • Assessment of need (ODR rates, staff assessment) • Readiness: • Is SWPBIS Tier 1 in place? (TIC = 80%; SET = 80/80) • Is there faculty commitment to work with tougher kids? • Arein-schoolresources available to implement? • Are districtresources available to support start-up? • Team to manage CICO • Administrator; CICO Coordinator; Check In/Out staff member(s), behavior Specialist (e.g. SPED/SPSY), Teacher

  18. Complete the CICO Self-Assessment & Identify Actions for improved implementation

  19. Check In & Check Out: Planning Logistics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UqMdy5-OSlQ

  20. CICO Plan Weekly CICO Meeting 9 Week Graph Sent Morning Check-In Program Update Home Check-In EXIT Afternoon Check-out BEP/Check-in Check-out Cycle Student Recommended for CICO • Morning Check-In • Check student “status” • Review home card • Provide Daily Progress Rpt • Greet and praise Class Check out • Teacher Checks • Student give card to teacher • Teacher praise/ prime • Provide Daily Progress Rpt • Greet and praise • End of class feedback TeacherChecks Class Check in

  21. Logistics: Check-In • 5. Morning Check-in Routine • Teaching students when, when, how • Teaching check-in coordinator • Assess • Reward  provided for checking-in; breakfast treat, etc. • Set-up or Redirect • 6. Teacher Check-in/Check-out Routine • Teaching staff/faculty • Reward • Set-up for success, positive momentum • Evaluation Activity 5: Identify Check-in staff & location Define Check-in routine & how to train check-in staff Teacher check-in/check-out routine defined

  22. CICO Coordinator Leading Systems Implementation

  23. Organization and Structure • Coordinator • Chair CICO meetings, faculty contact, improvement • Specialist • Check-in, check-out, meeting, data entry, graphs • Together (Coordinator + Specialist) = 10 hours/wk • Meeting 45 min per week • Coordinator, Specialist, Sped faculty, Related Services • All staff commitment and training • Simple data collection and reporting system. WHAT FITS YOUR SCHOOL? Combining these roles/ responsibilities across multiple staff or not?

  24. CICO Coordinator: Selection Criteria and Considerations • Who would be a good coordinator? • What duties/responsibilities will he/she have? • Do we need to adjust schedules/time/ workload for this person? • How will we train the coordinator? • How will we evaluate the coordinators effectiveness? • Who will be our back-up coordinator? • What steps do we need to take to accomplish this?

  25. CICO Coordinator Responsibilities • Establish rapport with students • Provide training to all students before they begin CICO • Coordinate check-in and check-out • Possibly do Check-in & check-outs • Enter data daily (or monitor daily data entry) • Organize and summarize student data for meetings • Contact person for caregivers • Process requests for assistance • Lead meetings • Problem-solve

  26. Non-Examples CICO Coordinator • Principal • Classroom teacher • Any individual responsible for discipline Examples Social worker Counselor Special Education teacher Paraprofessional

  27. Coordinator: Training • The coordinator should receive training in the systems, practices, and the use of data in the CICO program. • Connect w/ your District & Regional Coaches • Be sure to train a “back-up” coordinator

  28. CICO Coordinator: Planning for Sustainability • Plan for turn-over in the coordinator position • Increasing sustainability • Document all procedures • Active management from the leadership team • Write coordinator duties into a job description • Devote FTE to the coordinator position

  29. Getting Creative: CICO Specialists These individuals only do check-in/check-outs w/ students only (data and organization is the CICO Coordinator’s responsibility) • School custodian • School office staff members • “Specials” teachers

  30. Checking In & Checking Out: A good candidate is. . . • In the building everyday • Available at the beginning and end of each day • Someone students like and enjoy being around • Enthusiastic • Organized • Positive

  31. CICO Coordinator: Ensuring “Best Fit” & Fidelity The effectiveness of implementation should be examined on a regular basis Evaluation Questions: • Does the coordinator establish positive rapport with students? • Does the coordinator display effective behavior management skills? • Does the coordinator’s position allow all tasks to be completed in a timely manner? • Is the coordinator implementing the intervention with fidelity? • CICO Self Assessment, Benchmarks of Advanced Tiers, etc. • Integrate CICO implementation fidelity within a district evaluation plan

  32. Roles & Responsibilities • 2. Team available / Coordinator available • CICO Coordinator • CICO Specialists (checking in & out w/ students daily) • Team (meets at least once every two weeks) • Activity 2: • Plan CICO Roles & Responsibilities • CICO Coordinator • CICO Specialist(s) • Who is doing daily Check-ins & Check-outs? • behavior: Individual Student Systems Data Team meetings • Training Day 2

  33. Developing a Point Card

  34. Fit your Context:Make the program/card your own • Use a School name, mascot, motto • Sunshine Club • Hawk Report • HUG – Hello, Update, Goodbye • CnC – Check-n-Connect • CICO – Check-In/Check-Out • BEP – behavior Education Program

  35. Point Card Guidelines • Try to use 1 card for the program • Use common schedule if possible • Use School-wide Rules • Keep it simple • Card needs to be quick & easy for staff to complete • Card needs to be small (half sheet) & easy to carry around

  36. Too complicated… Too many ratings

  37. High School/Middle School Example

  38. Example Middle School Point Card

  39. Modifying CICO • Younger children (K-1st grade) • Less words, more pictures • More frequent checks during day • Earn rewards more often

  40. CICO Home Report Name: _____________________ Date: _____________ ______ I met my goal today ______ I had a hard day One thing I did really well today was:_______________________ Something I will work on tomorrow is: _______________________ Comments: Parent/Guardian Signature: ________________________________________________________ Comments: