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Public Officials Mitigation Action Planning Workshop G-711 PowerPoint Presentation
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Public Officials Mitigation Action Planning Workshop G-711

Public Officials Mitigation Action Planning Workshop G-711

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Public Officials Mitigation Action Planning Workshop G-711

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  1. Public Officials Mitigation Action Planning Workshop G-711

  2. PURPOSE OF COURSE • Provide training and guidance for development, approval, implementation, and maintenance of a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) • Assist local Governments to comply with the provisions of the Stafford Act/CFR 44 part 201

  3. TOPICS TO BE DISCUSSED • 1. Mitigation and Sustainability • 2. Partnerships and Annex P • 3. The Hazard Analysis Process • 4. Mitigation Goals and Strategies • 5. Developing a Comprehensive Mitigation Action Plan • 6. Financial Assistance Programs

  4. RESOURCE MATERIALS • Mitigation Handbook (DEM-21) • Sample Annex P and Checklist P • State of Texas Hazard Analysis • APA Planning Advisory Service Report Number 483/484 • FEMA publications 258, 364, 365, and 372 • FEMA “How To Guides” 386-1 through 386-7 (as published) • State and Local Plan Interim Criteria Under the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 (FEMA Draft) Section 1

  5. On-Line Resource Materials • DEM Publications WWW.TXDPS.STATE.TX.US/DEM 512-424-2138 • FEMA Publications http://www.fema.gov/library/prepandprev.shtm 1-800-480-2520 Section 1

  6. SECTION 1 MITIGATION AND SUSTAINABILITY Section 1

  7. TEXAS IS VULNERABLE TO A WIDE RANGE OF HAZARDS • Most frequent and most damaging are • natural events • Natural forces of fire, wind, and water have • occurred for centuries • Natural forces are destructive, but natural • environment is resilient Section 1

  8. OUR BUILDINGS AND INFRASTRUCTURE ARE NOT AS RESILIENT AS NATURE • Disasters happen when natural forces collide • with our built environment • Disaster recovery is very expensive and time • consuming • People and community suffer and are never • “Made Whole” again Section 1

  9. Texas Hazard Facts Major Disaster Declarations 1953-2002 # Principal Cause % 37 Flood 50 15 Tornado 20 17 Hurricane/Tropical Storm 23 5 Freezing Weather/Hail 7 74 100 Section 1

  10. DISASTER FREQUENCY, DESTRUCTIVENESS, AND COSTS IN HUMAN SUFFERING AND DOLLARS ARE INCREASING • Need to stop vicious cycle of destruction-repairs, • destruction-repairs to sustain future growth and • prosperity • Need to better use knowledge of natural forces to ease • tension between our future development and nature • Need common sense applications to build smarter and • safer to increase our resiliency to hazards • Need to pass on vibrant, safe, disaster resistant • communities to our future generations Section 1

  11. These goals can be achieved through implementation of Hazard Mitigation actions, and commitment to Sustainable Development of our communities. Section 1

  12. HAZARD MITIGATION Mitigationis defined as sustained actions taken to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and property from hazards and their effects. The purpose of mitigation is twofold: to protect people and structures, and to minimize the costs of disaster response and recovery. Section 1

  13. HAZARD MITIGATION • Mitigation is doing something TODAY to help reduce • the loss of life and property during future events. • Mitigation is the cornerstone of effective emergency • management • Mitigation is investment of current dollars to reduce • demand for future dollars, and produce repetitive • benefits over time. Section 1

  14. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT Sustainable Developmentis defined as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs Section 1

  15. SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT • Sustainable Development is not ‘No Growth”, but • is “Smart Growth”, better supported by natural • surroundings. • Sustainable Development utilizes the inherent • value of natural surroundings to protect the community • and reduce the consequences of hazards. • Sustainable Development advocates quality • development that best sustains the economy and • future growth. Section 1

  16. WHAT WE CAN ACHIEVE (1 of 2) • Provide more opportunities to sustain future • economic health and vitality through • conscientiously controlled growth and • development designed to make the community • more resilient to the consequences of hazards. Section 1

  17. WHAT WE CAN ACHIEVE (2 of 2) • Save lives, and reduce damages, and costs • through actions to reduce vulnerability and • risks from hazards • Restore and maintain the benefits and • balance between our future economic • vitality and our non-renewable natural, • and cultural resources • Strengthen the community for today and • tomorrow by making it more disaster • resistant and sustainable Section 1

  18. SECTION 2 PARTNERSHIPS AND ANNEX P Section 2

  19. The key element in a successful mitigation program is a partnership that is active, committed, and participating in the mitigation process. Section 2

  20. BENEFITS OF A TEAM APPROACH • Brings more resources to bear on the problem. • Brings more information to the table, resulting • in better decisions. • Team members are more committed to a product • they had a hand in producing. • Facilitates mutual support for implementation. • Citizens have input and visibility, can see the • efforts of their elected officials. Section 2

  21. How do I go about forming and utilizing a Hazard Mitigation Team? The State of Texas recommends that you develop and maintain an Annex P to establish your team. http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/dem/mitigation_planning_advisory_040202.htm Section 2

  22. YOUR ANNEX P • Identifies the members of your Hazard Mitigation Team • (HMT). • Identifies the team leader - your Hazard Mitigation • Coordinator (HMC). • Defines the tasks and responsibilities of the HMT and HMC. • Describes your mitigation process and procedures for • pre-incident, incident response, and post-incident activities. • Facilitates the collection and access to hazard-related • resource data. Section 2

  23. Possible Mitigation Team Members • A member of the City Council or Commissioners Court. • The community planner or a planning board member. • The Floodplain Administrator • A building codes/permits official or community Engineer. • Public works personnel. • The Emergency Management Coordinator. • Tax Assessment • Historical Preservation • Parks and Wildlife • River Authority • Representatives of the business community. • Representatives of adjoining communities • GIS Services • Fire and Casualty Insurance Section 2

  24. Hazard Mitigation Coordinator • Individual appointed from within the designated primary • agency/organization that is responsible for day to day • mitigation program activities and for coordinating the • activities of the Hazard Mitigation Team. A floodplain • administrator, city planner, engineer, grant specialist, etc. • are all excellent candidates. The HMC must be • prepared to commit a significantly high amount of time • and energy to organize and administer an on-going • hazard mitigation program. A successful and effective • program must be multi-disciplined and dynamic, and • requires an HMC that is knowledgeable, focused, and • an active participant. Section 2

  25. Public Involvement • Public Input will be required to ensure workable • solutions to hazard caused problems. • - Local officials and residents will provide useful • historical information • - Local officials and residents will ensure that • approved actions are implemented • Public input is obtained by: • - Hosting public input workshops • - Having citizen groups on the Team • - Notices in/on local media outlets Section 2

  26. Questions? Section 2

  27. SECTION 3 HAZARD ANALYSIS PROCESS Section 3

  28. A LOCAL HAZARD ANALYSIS DETERMINES: • WHAT HAZARDS COULD OCCUR. • FREQUENCY of OCCURRENCE. • HAZARDS IMPACT on COMMUNITY and SEVEREITY of IMPACT. • VULNERBILITY to EACHHAZARD. • MAJOR HAZARDS w/GREATEST RISKS • Possible PRIORITIZED MITIGATION ACTIONS Section 3

  29. A HAZARD ANALYSIS IS A FIVE STEP PROCESS • CREATE and INVENTORY SECTORS • IDENTIFY HAZARDS • PROFILE EACH HAZARD • DETERMINE VULNERABILITY and ASSOCIATED RISKS • PRIORITIZE HAZARDS Section 3

  30. HAZARD ANLAYSIS STEP 1SECTORING PROCESS • PEOPLE • HOUSING UNITS • KEY Facilities • SPECIAL Facilities • INFRASTRUCTURE and LIFELINES • HAZMAT Facilities • COMMERCIAL Facilities Section 3

  31. HAZARD ANALYSIS STEP 2IDENTIFY HAZARDS • Natural • Technological • Civil or Political • Cascading Potential Section 3

  32. Texas Hazard Facts Floods • 4,772 flash floods (1986 - 2000) • 10,775,553 Floodplain acres, LA has 7,795,336 • 34,657 repetitive losses @ $617 Million since 1978, LA is #1 with 55,323 losses 12,053 Repetitive loss structures, 109 of worst 500 328,259 NFIP Policies with $41.3 Billion in coverage Major Disaster Declarations: 37/50% Section 3

  33. Texas Hazard Facts Tornadoes • Average 125 per year (1950 - 1998), Florida has 49 per year • Average 49 tornado days per year, Florida had 31 days per year • 475 Deaths & 7,452 injuries (1950 - 1994) • Vast majority are F1-F2, only one F5 each decade Major Disaster Declarations: 15/20% Section 3

  34. Texas Hazard Facts Hurricanes/Tropical Storms • 37 landfalls since 1900, Florida had 57 • Landfall average is every 3.7 years • 22 counties (181 jurisdictions at risk) • 5,379,917 people at risk (26% of state) • Tornadoes, (Allen-29) (Alicia-22) (Gilbert-29) (Beulah-115) Major Disaster Declarations: 17/23% Section 3

  35. TECHNOLOGICAL HAZARDS • Dam Failures • Fires • Hazardous Material Events • Nuclear Accidents Section 3

  36. CIVIL or POLITICAL HAZARDS • RIOTING • LARGE DEMONSTRATIONS • TERRORISM Section 3

  37. Cascading Potential • Disasters frequently cause follow-on events that are disasters in themselves! • Secondary Impact(s), (also called residual impacts) Section 3

  38. HAZARD ANALYSIS STEP 3 HAZARD PROFILE (See Hazard Profile Worksheet) DEVELOP A PROFILE FOR EACH HAZARD • Frequency of Occurrence • Severity of Impact • Area(s) Affected • Duration • Seasonal Pattern • Warning Time/ Availability of Warning • Cascading Potential Section 3

  39. HAZARD ANALYSIS STEP 4VULNERABILITY & RISK(See Vulnerability Worksheet} VULNERABILITY • Identify what can be destroyed/damaged for each group and each Hazard RISK • The potential or probability that a Hazard will cause adverse impact(s) Section 3

  40. HAZARD ANALYSIS STEP 5PRIORITIZE HAZARDS “HAZARD IMPACT AND RISK SUMMARY” - A CROSS REFERENCE OF DATA COLLECTED- TO INCLUDE: • Frequency of Occurrence • Warning Time • Potential Severity • Risk Level Section 3

  41. SOURCES OF INFORMATION • State of Texas Hazard Analysis • National Weather Service • Local Historical Documents/Local History • Internet Sources (FEMA,TCEQ (TNRCC), USACE, etc.) • LEPC • Council of Government, libraries, newspapers, chamber of commerce, etc. Section 3

  42. Examples of Hazard Analysis Data Collection The following slides give examples of the kind of information a jurisdiction staff should be able to generate. These are summaries only, a real team will be able to generate much more accurate and detailed data. Section 3

  43. Geography Thin soils, steep slopes, rocky No slope, deep-silt soils Deep clay soil, gentle slopes Section 3

  44. Demographic Profile 1810-1930s 70s-80s special 40s-60s 90s-now industrial Section 3

  45. Flood 100 year 500 year Dam breach Section 3

  46. 1%Flood Risk to Population 27 red@35/block + 142 yellow@100/block + 42 green@ 50/block + 40 blue@40/block = 18,845 citizens at risk in the 100 year floodplain. Removing 400 houses known to be elevated =17,000 Section 3

  47. Flood Risk to Critical/City Facilities In 1% Floodplain: 8 day care/nursing homes, 3 city shelters, 1 city equipment park, 1 hospital, 3 fuel tank farms, 1 telephone exchange, 4 power substations, 3 schools, and 1 fire station. Section 3

  48. Tornado Town is in Texas tornado frequency zone 5, >20 per year zone 1 zone 2 zone3 zone 4 Section 3 zone 5

  49. Coastal Windstorm City is in Risk Area 2 96-110 mph (may also be at risk from storm surge up Roaring River) Risk area 5 Risk area 4 Risk area 3 Risk area 2 Section 3 Risk area 1

  50. Point Hazmat Prevailing wind Downwind hazard area Section 3