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Exponential Functions Logarithmic Functions Exponential Functions as Mathematical Models PowerPoint Presentation
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Exponential Functions Logarithmic Functions Exponential Functions as Mathematical Models

Exponential Functions Logarithmic Functions Exponential Functions as Mathematical Models

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Exponential Functions Logarithmic Functions Exponential Functions as Mathematical Models

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  1. 3 • Exponential Functions • Logarithmic Functions • Exponential Functions as Mathematical Models Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

  2. 3.1 Exponential Functions

  3. Exponential Function • The function defined by is called an exponential function with baseb and exponentx. • The domain of f is the set of all real numbers.

  4. Example • The exponential function with base2 is the function with domain(–, ). • The values of f(x) for selected values of x follow:

  5. Example • The exponential function with base2 is the function with domain(–, ). • The values of f(x) for selected values of x follow:

  6. Laws of Exponents • Let a and b be positive numbers and let x and y be real numbers. Then,

  7. Examples • Let f(x) = 22x – 1. Find the value of x for which f(x) = 16. Solution • We want to solve the equation 22x – 1= 16 = 24 • But this equation holds if and only if 2x – 1 = 4 giving x = .

  8. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = 2x. Solution • First, recall that the domain of this function is the set of real numbers. • Next, putting x = 0 gives y = 20 = 1, which is the y-intercept. (There is no x-intercept, since there is no value of x for which y = 0)

  9. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = 2x. Solution • Now, consider a few values for x: • Note that 2xapproaches zero as xdecreases without bound: • There is a horizontal asymptote at y = 0. • Furthermore, 2xincreases without bound when xincreases without bound. • Thus, the range of f is the interval(0, ).

  10. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = 2x. Solution • Finally, sketch the graph: y 4 2 f(x) = 2x x –2 2

  11. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = (1/2)x. Solution • First, recall again that the domain of this function is the set of real numbers. • Next, putting x = 0 gives y = (1/2)0 = 1, which is the y-intercept. (There is no x-intercept, since there is no value of x for which y = 0)

  12. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = (1/2)x. Solution • Now, consider a few values for x: • Note that (1/2)xincreases without bound when xdecreases without bound. • Furthermore, (1/2)xapproaches zero as xincreases without bound: there is a horizontal asymptote at y = 0. • As before, the range of f is the interval(0, ).

  13. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = (1/2)x. Solution • Finally, sketch the graph: y 4 2 f(x) = (1/2)x x –2 2

  14. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = (1/2)x. Solution • Note the symmetry between the two functions: y 4 2 f(x) = 2x f(x) = (1/2)x x –2 2

  15. Properties of Exponential Functions • The exponential functiony = bx (b > 0, b≠ 1) has the following properties: • Its domain is (–, ). • Its range is (0, ). • Its graph passes through the point (0, 1) • It is continuous on (–, ). • It is increasing on (–, ) if b > 1 and decreasing on (–, ) if b < 1.

  16. The Base e • Exponential functions to the basee, where e is an irrational number whose value is 2.7182818…, play an important role in both theoretical and applied problems. • It can be shown that

  17. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = ex. Solution • Since ex> 0 it follows that the graph ofy = exis similar to the graph ofy = 2x. • Consider a few values for x:

  18. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = ex. Solution • Sketching the graph: y f(x) = ex 5 3 1 x –3 –1 1 3

  19. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = e–x. Solution • Since e–x> 0 it follows that 0 < 1/e < 1 and so f(x) = e–x= 1/ex= (1/e)x is an exponential function with base less than1. • Therefore, it has a graph similar to that of y = (1/2)x. • Consider a few values for x:

  20. Examples • Sketch the graph of the exponential function f(x) = e–x. Solution • Sketching the graph: y 5 3 1 f(x) = e–x x –3 –1 1 3

  21. 3.2 Logarithmic Functions

  22. Logarithms • We’ve discussed exponential equations of the form y = bx (b > 0, b≠ 1) • But what about solving the same equation fory? • You may recall that y is called the logarithm of x to the base b, and is denoted logbx. • Logarithm of x to the base b y = logbxif and only ifx = by(x > 0)

  23. Examples • Solve log3x= 4 for x: Solution • By definition, log3x= 4 implies x = 34 = 81.

  24. Examples • Solve log164= x for x: Solution • log164= x is equivalent to 4 = 16x = (42)x= 42x, or 41 = 42x, from which we deduce that

  25. Examples • Solve logx8= 3 for x: Solution • By definition, we see that logx8= 3 is equivalent to

  26. Logarithmic Notation log x = log10xCommon logarithm ln x = logexNatural logarithm

  27. Laws of Logarithms • If m and n are positive numbers, then

  28. Examples • Given that log 2 ≈ 0.3010, log 3 ≈ 0.4771, and log 5 ≈ 0.6990, use the laws of logarithms to find

  29. Examples • Given that log 2 ≈ 0.3010, log 3 ≈ 0.4771, and log 5 ≈ 0.6990, use the laws of logarithms to find

  30. Examples • Given that log 2 ≈ 0.3010, log 3 ≈ 0.4771, and log 5 ≈ 0.6990, use the laws of logarithms to find

  31. Examples • Given that log 2 ≈ 0.3010, log 3 ≈ 0.4771, and log 5 ≈ 0.6990, use the laws of logarithms to find

  32. Examples • Expand and simplify the expression:

  33. Examples • Expand and simplify the expression:

  34. Examples • Expand and simplify the expression:

  35. Examples • Use the properties of logarithms to solve the equation forx: Law 2 Definition of logarithms

  36. Examples • Use the properties of logarithms to solve the equation forx: Laws 1 and 2 Definition of logarithms

  37. Logarithmic Function • The function defined by is called the logarithmic function with baseb. • The domain of f is the set of all positive numbers.

  38. Properties of Logarithmic Functions • The logarithmic function y = logbx (b > 0, b≠ 1) has the following properties: • Its domain is (0, ). • Its range is (–, ). • Its graph passes through the point (1, 0). • It is continuous on (0, ). • It is increasing on (0, ) if b > 1 and decreasing on (0, ) if b < 1.

  39. Example • Sketch the graph of the function y = ln x. Solution • We first sketch the graph of y = ex. • The required graph is the mirror image of the graph of y = ex with respect to the line y = x: y y = x y = ex y = ln x 1 x 1

  40. Properties Relating Exponential and Logarithmic Functions • Properties relating ex and ln x: eln x = x (x > 0) ln ex = x(for any real number x)

  41. Examples • Solve the equation 2ex + 2 = 5. Solution • Divide both sides of the equation by 2 to obtain: • Take the natural logarithm of each side of the equation and solve:

  42. Examples • Solve the equation 5 ln x + 3 = 0. Solution • Add –3 to both sides of the equation and then divide both sides of the equation by 5 to obtain: and so:

  43. 3.3 Exponential Functions as Mathematical Models Growth of bacteria Radioactive decay Assembly time

  44. Applied Example: Growth of Bacteria • In a laboratory, the number of bacteria in a culture grows according to where Q0 denotes the number of bacteria initially present in the culture, k is a constant determined by the strain of bacteria under consideration, and t is the elapsed time measured in hours. • Suppose 10,000 bacteria are present initially in the culture and 60,000 present two hours later. • How many bacteria will there be in the culture at the end of four hours?

  45. Applied Example: Growth of Bacteria Solution • We are given that Q(0) = Q0 = 10,000, so Q(t) = 10,000ekt. • At t = 2 there are 60,000 bacteria, so Q(2) = 60,000, thus: • Taking the natural logarithm on both sides we get: • So, the number of bacteria present at any time t is given by:

  46. Applied Example: Growth of Bacteria Solution • At the end of four hours (t = 4), there will be or 360,029bacteria.

  47. Applied Example: Radioactive Decay • Radioactive substances decay exponentially. • For example, the amount of radium present at any time t obeys the law where Q0is the initial amount present and k is a suitable positive constant. • The half-life of a radioactive substance is the time required for a given amount to be reduced by one-half. • The half-life of radium is approximately 1600 years. • Suppose initially there are 200 milligrams of pure radium. • Find the amount left after t years. • What is the amount after 800 years?

  48. Applied Example: Radioactive Decay Solution • Find the amount left after t years. The initial amount is 200 milligrams, so Q(0) = Q0 = 200, so Q(t) = 200e–kt The half-life of radium is 1600 years, so Q(1600) = 100, thus

  49. Applied Example: Radioactive Decay Solution • Find the amount left after t years. Taking the natural logarithm on both sides yields: Therefore, the amount of radium left after t years is:

  50. Applied Example: Radioactive Decay Solution • What is the amount after 800 years? In particular, the amount of radium left after800 years is: or approximately 141 milligrams.