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Self Discovery Sketchbook Curriculum

Self Discovery Sketchbook Curriculum

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Self Discovery Sketchbook Curriculum

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  1. Self Discovery Sketchbook Curriculum 30 Week Curriculum 2 classes per week, 1.5 hours per class 11th-12th Grades Emily Gleason

  2. Table of Contents • 1) Curriculum Introduction • 2-5) PA Standards • 6) Prompt Queries • 7) Curriculum Objectives • 8-9) Habits of Mind • 10-25) Lesson Plans and Visual Resources

  3. 30 Week Curriculum • 13 lessons span 60 classes, each being 1.5 hours long, for a weekly total of 3 hours. • Introductory class exercises include creative self assessment, and an exploration of artists known for sketchbook work. • This curriculum will explore the nature of self expression through creativity, as well as an expression of how the self relates to community. • Assessment will include project specific rubrics, peer-to-peer assessment, critiques, and self assessment in the form of essays and artist statement.

  4. Pennsylvania State Standards, Visual Arts • 9.1.12.A: Know and use the elements and principles of each art form to create works in the arts and humanities. 
 

Elements • Dance: • energy/force • space • time • Music: • duration • intensity • pitch • timbre  • Theatre: • scenario • script/text • set design  • Visual Arts: • color • form/shape • line • space • texture • value   • Principles • Dance: • choreography • form • genre • improvisation • style • technique   • Music: • composition • form • genre • harmony • rhythm • texture   • Theatre: • balance • collaboration • discipline • emphasis • focus • intention • movement • rhythm • style • voice   • Visual Arts: • balance • contrast • emphasis/focal point • movement/rhythm • proportion/scale • repetition • unity/harmony

  5. 9.1.12.B: Recognize, know, use and demonstrate a variety of appropriate arts elements and principles to produce, review and revise original works in the arts. • Dance: • move • perform • read and notate dance • create and choreograph • improvise • Music: • sing • play an instrument • read and notate music • compose and arrange •improvise • Theatre: • stage productions • read and write scripts • improvise • interpret a role • design sets • direct • Visual Arts: • paint • draw • craft • sculpt • print • design for environment, communication, multi-media • 9.1.12.C: Integrate and apply advanced vocabulary to the arts forms.

  6. 9.1.12.D: Demonstrate specific styles in combination through the production or performance of a unique work of art (e.g., a dance composition that combines jazz dance and African dance). • 9.1.12.E: Delineate a unifying theme through the production of a work of art that reflects skills in media processes and techniques. • 9.1.12.F: Analyze works of arts influenced by experiences or historical and cultural events through production, performance or exhibition. • 9.1.12.G: Analyze the effect of rehearsal and practice sessions. • 9.1.12.H: Incorporate the effective and safe use of materials, equipment and tools into the production of works in the arts at work and performance spaces. • Evaluate the use and applications of materials. • Evaluate issues of cleanliness related to the arts. • Evaluate the use and applications of mechanical/electrical equipment. • Evaluate differences among selected physical space/environment. • Evaluate the use and applications of safe props/stage equipment. • Evaluate the use and apply safe methods for storing materials in the arts.

  7. 9.1.12.I: Distinguish among a variety of regional arts events and resources and analyze methods of selection and admission. • 9.1.12.J: Analyze and evaluate the use of traditional and contemporary technologies for producing, performing and exhibiting works in the arts or the works of others. • Analyze traditional technologies (e.g., acid printing, etching methods, musical instruments, costume materials, eight track recording, super 8 movies). • Analyze contemporary technologies (e.g., virtual reality design, instrument enhancements, photographic tools, broadcast equipment, film cameras, preservation tools, web graphics, computer generated marching band designs). • 9.1.12.K: Analyze and evaluate the use of traditional and contemporary technologies in furthering knowledge and understanding in the humanities.

  8. Prompt Queries • Do I have a style? • What are some styles of other artists that I feel inspired by? • What are some ways my community is represented in my artwork? • How do others explore their own personal style? • How have we grown as artists during 30 weeks?

  9. Curriculum Objectives • The use of sketchbooks is a catalyst for self exploration. Lesson plans focus on illustrating the student’s internal world. • As well as the development of sex expression, curriculum objectives focus on the awareness of the creative perspectives of other students. This peer awareness is fostered through peer-to-peer projects, and group critique. • Self knowledge, and the ability to express this knowledge through critique and writing, is a vital component of secondary and post secondary education. Through classroom exercises, students can build on these skills, which increase in importance in the future. • School communities are built and maintained through the focused efforts of teachers and students, to foster dialogue and social opportunity. Through group and peer-to-peer projects, this curriculum encourages an expression of a larger community, both school and at home. • Knowledge of other artists and cultural context allows students a gateway to explore artistic movements. Art and culture define our communities.

  10. Habits of Mind • 1. Persisting • 2. Managing Impulsivity • 3. Listening to Others with Understanding and Empathy • 4. Thinking Flexibly • 5. Thinking About Our Thinking (Metacognition) • 6. Striving for Accuracy and Precision • 7. Questioning and Posing Problems • 8. Applying Past Knowledge to New Situations • 9. Thinking and Communicating with Clarity and Precision

  11. 10. Gathering Data Through All Senses 11. Creating, Imagining and Innovating 12. Responding with Wonderment and Awe 13. Taking Responsible Risks 14. Finding Humor 15. Thinking Interdependently 16. Learning Continuously

  12. Hand Made Sketchbooks • Length: 4 Classes, 6 hours total, 2 weeks. • Creative Activities: Research some artists that have had excellent sketchbooks. Using a second hand, hardcover book, make a repurposed sketchbook out of recycled and purchased paper, which will serve as a place for class assignments. • Associated Artists and Artwork: Diverse swaths of artists have used sketchbooks to strengthen their artistic practices, or to serve as artistic products by themselves. Artists known for their sketchbooks include Frida Kahlo, Henri Matisse, R. Crumb, Pablo Picasso, and Jean Michel Basquiat. • Objectives: 1) Students will research different creative sketchbook styles, 2) Students will create a sketchbook of their own choice of materials, 3) Students will demonstrate basic bookbinding techniques • Materials: A second hand hard cover book, scrap, recycled, and new paper, needle and thread, book cloth, and paper for end pages. • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Proportion and scale, balance, pattern. • Habits of Mind: Persistence, Striving for accuracy, Gathering data through all senses, Creating, Imagining and Innovating. • Assessment: In class show and tell/critique, assessment emphasis will need to revolve around sketchbook functionality. Craft is measurable, and essential. • Resources: Visual examples of other sketchbooks, exemplar to complete in class. • Cost: $$$

  13. Visual Resources Frida Kahlo R. Crumb

  14. Basic Drawing Exercise • Length: 4 classes, 6 hours total, 2 weeks. • Creative Activities: Observe some drawing warm up techniques. Many revolve around self expression, and awareness of one’s environment. Choose 4 activities from a list. Some may involve a partner, so engage others in your seating area. Compare and discuss artwork. This lesson serves as a gauge of initial student abilities. Activity list: Draw your foot, draw your shoe, draw your backpack, draw your face in shadow, draw the person sitting next to you while they draw you, draw your best friend, draw your pet, draw your room, draw the art room, draw your mom, draw your house form the outside, draw your hand, draw any of the above without looking, draw a real animal, draw a fantasy animal. • Associated Artists and Artwork: Betty Edwards’ Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain offers drawing exercises that break up drawing into learnable components. Edwards; focuses on the work of Henri Matisse, and Egon Schiele. • Objectives: 1) Students will research different methods for drawing improvement and choose their own exercises, 2) Students will demonstrate their drawing skills by drawing their personal surroundings, 3) Students will self assess their own abilities and areas of improvements, as well as that of their peers. • Materials: Assorted basic drawing supplies; pencils, pens, conte crayon, pastel. • Standards: 9.1, 9.2. 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Line, shape/form, value, texture, space/perspective, proportion scale, balance. • Habits of Mind: Persevering, Listening with empathy and understanding, thinking flexibly, striving for accuracy, applying past knowledge, creating, imagining and innovating, finding humor, remaining open to continuous learning. • Assessment: Self assessment including assessing strengths, and areas of improvement. Class critique. • Resources: Drawing From the Right Side of the Brain book, Activity exemplars.

  15. Visual Resources

  16. Self Portrait Three Ways Exercise • Length: 3 classes, 4.5 hours, 1.5 weeks • Creative Activities: Using a photograph of yourself, draw a self portrait in contour style. When you feel satisfied with these results, draw your self portrait again, without looking at you paper. Lastly, place your photo upside down, and draw your image. Compare drawings with others. Which were most successful. This may be surprising. Have you learned anything about your drawing style? • Associated Artists and Artwork: Contour style and blind contour drawing has been utilized by Egon Schiele, Picasso, Degas, and Matisse, as well as others. • Objectives: 1) Students will research and observe the style of contour, and the work of associated artists, 2) Students will exercise their own drawing skills using drawing exercises, 3) Students will analyze the way in which they draw. • Materials: Pencil, Paper. • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principals: Line, shape/form, proportion scale. • Habits of Mind: Persistence, Metacognition, finding humor. • Assessment: Self assessment and critique. • Recourses: Example of artwork, examplars of contour drawing. • Cost: $

  17. Visual Resources Egon Schiele

  18. Abstract Expressionist Painting • Length: 2 Classes, 3 hours, 1 week • Creative Activities: Research paintings of abstract expressionists, such as Helen Frankenthaler, Lynda Benglis, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko. On canvas, paint a quick abstract painting that is not precious. This painting will be deconstructed, and put in sketchbook in a later lesson. • Associated Artists and Artwork: Abstract expressionists, such as Helen Frankenthaler, Lynda Benglis, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko. • Objectives: 1) Students will observe and discuss abstract expressionism, 2) Students will produce a work inspired by historical influences, 3) Students will consider the aesthetic merit of their piece. • Materials: Canvas, primer, paint, brushes. • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Shape, form, pattern, rhythm/movement, unity, emphasis. • Habits of Mind: Thinking flexibly, metacognition, creating, imagining and innovating, responding with wonderment and awe, taking responsible risks. • Assessment: Group critique. • Recourses: Abstract expressionism painting examples and books, videos of action painting, if technology permits. • Cost: $$

  19. Visual Recourses Helen Frankenthaler

  20. Painting Cut –Up Self Portrait • Length: 6 classes, 3 weeks. • Creative Activities: Observe the work of Jean Michel Basquiat, and notice the use of layering, color, and mixed media. Draw a self portrait in your sketchbook that utilizes pieces of your abstract painting. Keep in mind the expression created, such as mood and feeling. Critique work as a class, and discuss how student artists represented themselves. • Associated Artists and Artwork: Jean Michel Basquiat, and the use of mixed media. • Objectives: 1) Students will research the artwork of Jean Michel Basquiat 2) Students will deconstruct a former piece, in order to evoke a mood or feeling, 3) Students will create a self portrait using mixed media. • Materials: Pen, ink, pencils, paint, pervious artwork. • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Shape/form, color, texture, emphasis. • Habits of Mind: Managing impulsivity, Listening with empathy and understanding, thinking flexibly, metacognition, gathering data through all senses, finding humor. • Assessment: Student lead critique, written artist statement. • Recourses: Basquiat examples and books, exemplars of textures and techniques. • Cost: $

  21. Visual Resources Jean Michel Basquiat

  22. Complete a Magazine Image • Length: 4 classes, 6 hours, 2 weeks. • Creative Activities: Choose a magazine cut out from the ones provided. Consider how to complete the image in a new and different way. Glue your image to your sketchbook, and draw in the completed image of your choice, with an emphasis on self expression. Use this image to depict a scene, place, or activity that represents you. As a group, discuss and critique this work. • Associated Artists and Artwork: • Objectives: 1) Students will abstract an image related to visual advertising, 2) Students will manipulate an image to better represent themselves using visual form, 3) Students will express their work and discuss the work of others during critique. • Materials: Magazine images, glue, pens, pencils, ink, brushes. • Standards: 9.1, 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Line, color, value, emphasis. • Habits of Mind: Thinking flexibly, questioning and posing problems, creating, imagining, and innovating. • Assessment: Related rubric, written student artist statement. • Cost: $

  23. Visual Resources Student Work

  24. Postal Art Grab Bag • Length: 6 classes, 3 weeks. • Creative Activities: Research the development of postal art. Choose a subject from a hat. Depict this subject in mixed media in your sketchbook several ways. Choose the most successful piece, and mail it to someone in the class, also chosen at random. Consider how this piece may be perceived by someone else, and what moods may be conveyed. Would someone else be able to guess your subject? Subjects: Taste of a lemon, forest, desert, orchard, nightmare, dirty, summer, winter, insect, loud noises, heat, cold. • Associated Artists and Artwork: Postal artists such as Ray Johnson and Anna Banana, as well as the complied work, Post Secret. • Objectives: 1) Students will compare methods of postal art, 2) Students will respond creatively to random stimuli, 3) Students will self assess their work • Materials: Paint, mixed media • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Potentially all • Habits of Mind: Thinking flexibly, metacognition, striving for accuracy, remaining open to continuous learning. • Assessment: Written artist statement, related rubric. • Recourses: Post Secret book, Postal art examples, Exemplars. • Cost: $

  25. Visual Resources Anna Banana Ray Johnson

  26. Postal Art Student Response • Title: Postal Art Student Response • Length: 6 classes, 3 weeks. • Creative Activities: Attempt to guess the subject of the work that has been mailed to you. In your sketchbook, draw several examples of the subject you see in your postal piece. It is OK if your subject is different from the original. Compare your most successful piece to the original. In groups, discuss what themes have been created. • Associated Artists and Artwork: This lesson focuses on students as artists. • Objectives: 1) Students will assess their peer’s art, 2) Students will create a piece inspired by their classmate’s ideas, 3) Students will analyze the similarities and distinctions of their work as a group. • Materials: Paint and mixed media • Standards: 9.1, 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Color, emphasis, shape/form, unity. • Habits of Mind: Thinking flexibly, metacognition, thinking and communicating with clarity and precision, gathering data through all senses. • Assessment: Student lead critique • Recourses: Post Secret book, student work. • Cost: $

  27. Visual Resources Post Secret

  28. Sketch Book Trade Off • Length: 4 classes, 6 hours, 2 weeks. • Creative Activities: Trade your sketchbook with another student in the class. Produce a piece in their style, as you see it. Try to depict the things you like most about their style. • Associated Artists and Artwork: Student artists, as well as the peripheral influence of any artists we have learned about in this class. • Objectives: 1) Student will choose a classroom partner whose work to study and imitate 2) Students will define their understanding of their fellow students by producing work about them 3) Students will present written essays about their partner’s artistic style. • Materials: Pens, Pencils, ink, paint, mixed media. • Standards: 9.1, 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Potentially any. • Habits of Mind: Listening with empathy and understanding, metacognition, applying past knowledge, questioning and posing problems, gathering data through all senses. • Assessment: Students will write essays on the topic of “Who is (Name)? What is their art style? • Recourses: Display of student work, materials relating to artists already visited in this class. • Cost : $

  29. Visual Resources Henri Matisse Sketchbook, and Related Painting Picasso

  30. Artistic Mentor: Local Artists • Title: Artistic Mentor: Local Artists • Length: 6 classes, 3 weeks. • Creative Activities: Research local artists, and the context of their work. Does their artwork deal with their environment, or their community? Do they express themselves in their artwork? Produce sketches in several artists’ style, and then choose the most successful style for a larger piece. Produce a larger piece, outside of you sketchbook, guided by your sketchbook work. Write an artist statement about the artist you chose, and how that work relates to your work. • Associated Artists and Artwork: A selection of local artists, exemplar inspired by Zoe Strauss. • Objectives: 1) Students will Research and observe local artists, possibly visiting galleries and museums, 2) Students will produce a piece using their research, 3) Students will write their analysis of the work they produced, and the artists they chose. • Materials: Open materials and mixed media • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Potentially any • Habits of Mind: Striving for accuracy, metacognition, thinking and communicating with clarity and consideration. • Assessment: Rubric, critique. • Recourses: artistic examples, exemplars. • Cost: $-$$$ (Depends on project chosen, variable)

  31. Visual Resources Zoe Strauss Photography

  32. Community Art Inspired Sketching • Length: 8 classes, 4 weeks. • Creative Activities: Observe the nature of artwork in the community where you live. This could include murals, advertisement, street art and graffiti, performance art, and fashion. Sketch pieces that represent the creative nature of your community, using found objects or images from your observation. Finished works can tell a story about your community, and how you relate to your community. • Associated Artists and Artwork: The work of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, the work of Isaiah Zaagar, Steven Powers’ Love Letter Train Tour, Philadelphia Fashion Week, as well as the art students observe in their communities. • Objectives: 1) Students will collect information about their communities, 2) Students will create visual representations of their creative communities, 3) Students will explain in an artists statement their relationship to their creative community, and critique this work in class. • Materials: Media open, found objects. • Standards: 9.1, 9.3, 9.3, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Potentially any • Habits of Mind: Listening with empathy and understanding, metacognition, questioning and posing problems • Assessment: Self assessment, critique. • Resources: Visual examples of community artwork, Train Tour important, though not necessary. • Cost: $

  33. Visual Resources Steve Power Isaiah Zaagar

  34. Final Drawing Exercises • Length: 4 classes, 2 weeks. • Creative Activities: Choose 4 of the drawing exercises that you began your sketchbook with. Render them as faithfully as possible, with an aim to demonstrate your skills. How have you improved? Where might you continue to improve? What lessons did you like the most. • Associated Artists and Artwork: Student artists • Objectives: 1) Students will repeat previous creative process with a focus on showing new skills, 2) Students will assess their improvement 3) Students will write their experiences and reflections about their work. • Materials: Pen, ink, pencil, charcoal, conte crayon. • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Line, shape/form, value, texture, space/perspective, proportion scale, balance. • Habits of Mind: Persistence, striving for accuracy, applying past knowledge, remaining open to continuous learning. • Assessment: Written self evaluation. • Cost: $

  35. Japanese Book Art 3-D Pop Ups • Length: 4 Classes, 2 weeks • Creative Activities: Research art that involves Japanese origami, book art, and 3-D paper sculpture. Simple introductory projects include three dimensional stairs, and geometric structures. Pop up book artist Sam Ita has made pop up books of Frankenstein, Moby Dick, 2,000 Leagues Under the Sea, the Odyssey, and others. He post YouTube videos of his techniques! • Associated Artists and Artwork: Sam Ita, other Japanese artists and art culture • Objectives: 1) Students will research Japanese book art,2) Students will write a narrative that they wish to illustrate using Japanese 3-D book art techniques, 3) Students will tell their story using techniques learned. • Materials: Cardstock, paper, origami paper, scissors, pencils, ink, paint, markers • Standards: 9.1, 9.2, 9.4 • Elements and Principles: Line, shape/form, value, space/perspective, proportion scale, balance. • Habits of Mind: Persistence, striving for accuracy, remaining open to continuous learning, metacognition. • Assessment: Written self evaluation. •  Cost: $

  36. Visual Resources Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, Student Growth Examples

  37. Class Show and Final Critique • Title: Class Show and Final Critique • Length: 1 class, 1.5 hours. • Creative Activities: Group and individual student critique will address questions such as how have we grown as a class? Where have we improved? Do we know each other better after observing each other’s work? How can we improve? What are some strong pieces? • Associated Artists and Artwork: Peer to peer critique, peer inspiration. • Objectives: 1) Students will review the historical information, 2) Students will respond to critical questions, 3) Students will assess their work. • Materials: • Standards: 9.4 • Elements and Principles: • Habits of Mind: Potentially any/all • Assessment: Participation and self assessment. • Recourses: Student art work, space for viewing. • Cost: $-$$$ (Cost depends on method of curating, variable)

  38. Curatorial Ideas