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NOVEMBER GRREC MATH NETWORK November 29, 2011 PowerPoint Presentation
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NOVEMBER GRREC MATH NETWORK November 29, 2011

NOVEMBER GRREC MATH NETWORK November 29, 2011

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NOVEMBER GRREC MATH NETWORK November 29, 2011

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  1. NOVEMBER GRREC MATH NETWORKNovember 29, 2011 MOVING STUDENT LEARNING FORWARD

  2. grrec Math Facilitation Team

  3. Norms • Be present and engaged in our work. • We are equal partners. • Seek first to understand and then to be understood. • Stay positive. • Respect ideas of others. • One voice rule – no private conversations. • Be productive. • Be flexible and willing to change.

  4. Oct road map

  5. Targets 1. Participants can engineeran effective classroomdiscussion. 2.Participants can provide effective oral and written feedback to students, in order to move their learning forward.

  6. Targets 3. Participants will deepen their understanding of implementing a FAL. 4. Participants can select appropriate formative assessment strategies to positively impact student learning.

  7. Targets 5. Participants will deepen their understanding of number, operations, algebraic thinking and mathematics pedagogy.

  8. Please turn in your self-reflection.

  9. target Participants can provide effective ORALand written feedback to students, in order to move their learning forward.

  10. Please complete the Kitten task.

  11. What assumptions did you make?

  12. Creating feedback questions • Look over the student work provided. • As a table group follow the directions by creating questions that would move each student’s learning forward.

  13. target Participants can engineeran effective classroomdiscussion.

  14. Engineering effective discussion • For this activity divide the article into the following parts: • Part 1 – Beginning of article to end of The Five Practices Model section • Part 2 – Anticipating • Part 3 – Monitoring • Part 4 – Selecting • Part 5 – Sequencing • Part 6 – Connecting • Part 7 – Conclusion • Everyone will read Parts 1 and 7. Assign table group members Parts 2 – 6 to read. (Not everyone has to read all of these parts. You will share what you read after silent reading.)

  15. Engineering effective discussion • Read Parts 1, the section(s) you were assigned, and Part 7. • Annotate the article with the following symbols: Mark the text that affirms your prior knowledge with a check mark. Mark the text that surprises you with an exclamation point. Mark the text that you want or need to more about with a question mark.

  16. Engineering effective discussion Share in round robin fashion the content of your reading, along with the items you marked with the three symbols. Share in the following order: • Anticipating • Monitoring • Selecting • Sequencing • Connecting

  17. Engineering effective discussion • Monitoring Tool • How would you use the monitoring tool to help engineer effective classroom discussion?

  18. Morning BREAK During break, please move to a table with teacher leaders who have implemented the same Formative Assessment Lesson as you. Those who didn’t have time to implement a FAL should sit together.

  19. target • Participants can provide effective oral and WRITTENfeedback to students, in order to move their learning forward.

  20. Effective feedback • Individually write descriptive feedback on your samples of student work. • Follow the Feedback Review Protocolto analyze each other’s feedback. • Time may not allow everyone’s feedbackto be shared.

  21. target Participants will deepen their understanding of implementing a FAL.

  22. FAL Reflection In groups of 3-4 teachers who facilitated the same FAL: • Select a facilitator – who will hold each participant accountable for engaging in the conversation • Select a timekeeper – who will advance the conversations and keep track of the time allotted.

  23. Fal Reflection Utilize the FAL Reflection organizer to discuss the following topics: • How did it go? • What insight did student work provide? • Did feedback move learning forward?

  24. FAL reflection • Did you find mistakes in the FAL you implemented? • Were there ways that you thought you could make this FAL better? • Should there be revisions? If your group answered yes to any of these questions, please write your suggestions on the sheet provided.

  25. target Participants will deepen their understanding of number, operations, algebraic thinking and mathematics pedagogy.

  26. “Understand”… a working definition “Understand” is used in the math standards to mean that students can explain the concept with mathematical reasoning, including concrete illustrations, mathematical representations, and example applications.

  27. “Understand”… a working definition What does this show you about this 5th grade student’s understanding of mathematics? http://www.livescribe.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/LDApp.woa/wa/MLSOverviewPage?sid=LQcqHZxzMVqK

  28. lunch High School– 11:30-12:00 Elementary- 11:45-12:15 Middle- 12:00-12:30 • During your free time in this hour: • Move to a table so that you will be sitting in grade levels (K-8) or subject levels (High School) • Highlight the word understanding in your grade or subject level standards

  29. “Understand”… a working definition • What did the student understand about subtracting fractions? • How did hearing the student help you ‘see’ the student’s understanding vs. just seeing the math on paper? • Does he have a conceptualunderstanding of fractions?

  30. pacing • Discuss your pacing guides in your grade level groups • What topics have you taught? • What are you teaching before Christmas break? • What will you be teaching in January and February? • Decide on one big idea that will be a focus in January • You will either have taught by or will be teaching this concept in February.

  31. Big idea Fill this out and turn it in.

  32. Grade Band activities

  33. Task from ncsm • Work as a group to answer the Bridge Problem.

  34. The bridge problem • As a team, show the mathematics that Ted and Sam used to find the weight that the bridge could hold. • As a team write a few sentences that you would say to the City Council to defend your position.

  35. The bridge collapsed TED – Construction Engineer – 5 tons SAM - Construction Contractor – 1000 tons

  36. Mathematical Practices Think about this task: • What Standards for Mathematical Practice were embedded? How? • Understanding?

  37. Chapter 4 RSM: Number & Measurement Table groups will be assigned the following tasks from Ch 4: • Around Pi task - Alg.2 • Around the World task - Geom. • A Model Idea task - Alg.1 

  38. Chapter 4 RSM: Number & Measurement As you analyze the task, answer the following questions using your Common Core Standards and the Rigor and Relevance Template provided. • How does this task promote reasoning and sense making? • Which standards from CCSSM/KCASM and Quality Core does this task address? • How does this task show Rigor & Relevance?

  39. Good Questions

  40. Overview • 2 core strategies for differentiating math instruction • Open Questions • Parallel Tasks • Aligned to the NCTM Standards. • Quick strategies to engineer questions. • Supports the Mathematical Practices by focusing on questioning. • How does this connect to Five Strategies of Formative Assessment?

  41. Open Questions • A question is open when it is framed in such a way that a variety of responses or approaches are possible. • How might a student answer the following question? • Example: • Describe the picture using a mathematical equation: X XXX X XXX X XXX • What is the big idea? • How is this “open”? • How does this provide for differentiation?

  42. Why is this an Open Question? • Teacher asks whole class. • Purpose and Outcomes: • Question is designed to allow for differentiation of response based on each student’s understanding. • All students can participate fully. • Increases student confidence. • Students gain from discussion in classroom learning community.

  43. Strategies for Converting Conventional Questions to be “Open” • Turning around a question • Asking for similarities and differences • Replacing a • number with a blank (Pre-K-5) • number, shape, measurement unit, and so forth with a blank • Asking for a number sentence • Changing the question (Pre-K-5)

  44. You try one! Take a conventional question and “engineer” an Open Question using one of the strategies in your Good Questions book

  45. Parallel Tasks Two or three tasks “engineered” to meet the needs of students at different developmental levels but get a the same big idea and are close enough in context to be discussed simultaneously.

  46. Why is this a set of Parallel Tasks? • Example of Parallel Tasks: • Create a word problem that can be solved by multiplying two 1-digit numbers. • Create a word problem that can be solved by multiplying two numbers between 10 and 100. • What is the big idea? • How are the tasks parallel? • How do these tasks provide for differentiation?

  47. You try one! “Engineer” a set of Parallel Tasks.

  48. So what? How does this connect to Five Strategies of Formative Assessment?

  49. For next time? • Peruse/skim Chapter 1 • Pay attention to the examples provided

  50. Make sure to pick up your new book during break! Break