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Nuclear Medicine Workforce Study PowerPoint Presentation
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Nuclear Medicine Workforce Study

Nuclear Medicine Workforce Study

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Nuclear Medicine Workforce Study

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  1. Working Technologists NMT Program Directors 2,209 of 3,958 (55.8%) 60 of 127 (47.2%) Nuclear Medicine Workforce Study

  2. http://chws.albany.edu/ Others Studies in include:

  3. Technologist’s SurveyRelevant “Key Findings”

  4. Working Technologist’s Survey“Recommendations”

  5. Working Technologist’s SurveyRecommendation #1

  6. Working Technologist’s SurveyRecommendation #1 (continued)

  7. Program Director’s SurveyRelevant “Key Findings” • Most programs requiring 120 hours or greater of classroom/practicum were located in 4-year colleges and universities. More than half (56%) of community colleges required 75 or more hours of classroom/practicum for completion. • The number of credit hours in the professional component averaged 44.7 hours. Academic Medical Centers required the most (60 hours). Community colleges the least (39.7 hours). • A majority (59%) of programs required more than 1,200 hours of clinical practicum. Only 10% required fewer than 1,000 hours. • Nearly half (49%) of PD estimated that between 1% and 25% of student enrolling in their programs over the past 5 years already had a bachelor’s degree. An additional 30% indicated that between 26% and 50% already had Bachelor’s degrees. • Most PDs reported average to no difficulty for in students finding employment after graduation. Only 8% reported that finding employment after graduation was either difficult or very difficult. • 92% of PDs indicated that it was either important or imperative that NMTs be licensed in all states. Only 3% ranked it as unimportant.

  8. Program Director’s Survey“Key Issues for NMT Education Programs” • Lack of a standard in entry-level education for the profession; • Lack of NMT education programs in many parts of the country; • Lack of articulation agreements among education program to support advanced education; • Lack of continuing education opportunities for active NMTs in many academic programs; • Difficulty recruiting faculty for NMT education programs; • Non-competive faculty salaries; • Lack of flexible programming for non-traditional students; • Gaps in educational curricula, especially related to new and emerging technologies.

  9. Program Director’s Survey“Recommendations”

  10. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #1

  11. 66.1%

  12. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #2

  13. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #3

  14. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #4

  15. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #5

  16. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #6

  17. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #7

  18. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #8

  19. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #9

  20. Program Director’s SurveyRecommendation #10

  21. Program Director’s SurveyOther “Key Findings” • Departures of program directors will create demand for replacements to fill their vacant positions. 16.9% reported plans to retire in the next 5 years. • Most (92.7%) of programs offered day classes. Only 6% offered evening classes and 2% weekend classes. • Only 18% of PDs indicated intent to increase the availability of on-line coursework in the programs over the next 2 years. • Most programs offered both didactic (95%) and clinical (91.7%) instruction in PET. Fewer offered CT instruction (51.7% didactic, 38.3% clinical). MRI was taught even less often (16.7% didactic, 13.3% clinical). • Most NMT programs (86.7%) had only one graduation class per year. 8.3% had two. • Enrollment in programs has increased since 2004 with little change between 2005 and 2006. • 93% of PDs reported that their admissions process was competitive. The remaining 7% indicated that admission was open to any candidate who met minimum requirements. • Only 67% of program reported that 100% of their students graduating in 2005 had taken a certification exam. 5% reported that NONE of their graduates from 2005 have yet to take one of the exams.

  22. AGE

  23. SALARIES