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Honors English 9

Honors English 9

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Honors English 9

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  1. Honors English 9 Week 5: September 19-23, 2011

  2. Due Today: Poison Reading Notes and Theme Exploration Monday, September 19, 2011 • Walk-In: Please pick up an Elements of Literature textbook and take out your Poison reading notes and theme exploration: notes and paragraph. • Learning Objective: • Students will be able to analyze in detail a theme’s development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped by specific details, events, characters, and settings. • Readers select, apply, and self-monitor their use of skills, strategies, and processes in order to comprehend all types of texts. • Agenda: • Discuss Poison Theme Exploration • Choice Short Story Assignment Homework: Choice Short Story Assignment Due Friday

  3. Theme Exploration Theme development through conflicts/events: • True Character (or more specifically racism—Harry) • A person’s true character will show itself in the more stressful times. • A person’s racist tendencies may remain hidden until moments of stress. • Examples to support in order of text structure • 1. • 2. • 3. • 4. • 5.

  4. Main Idea: Introduces story, author and topic MEAL Model Evidence: First part provides background about the story M: In the story “The Scarlet Ibis,” by James Hurst, the theme, or author’s message is a person’s pride in ones own accomplishments may cause them to treat others cruelly. E. In the story the narrator is the older brother to Doodle. Doodle was born with a physical ailment that made it difficult to walk, run, and swim—all the activities that young children enjoy. The narrator was embarrassed by his brother and was determined to teach Doodle to do these things. He took pride in this, and says “but all of us must have something or someone to be proud of, and Doodle was mine. I did not know then that pride is a wonderful, terrible thing, a seed that bears two vines, life and death” (Hurst 318). Here the narrator begins to forget about what is best for Doodle, and focuses on his own emotions. Later on in the story this emotion has tragic results in the climax of the story when the Narrator, disappointed with Doodle’s progress, decides to run ahead and leave him behind in a storm, during one of Doodle’s training sessions. He says, “the knowledge that Doodle’s and my plans had come to naught was bitter, and that streak of cruelty within me wakened” (Hurst 323). A: Here the narrator’s pride causes him to feel disappointed in his and Doodle’s efforts and he decides to punish Doodle, without realizing that his brother may need his help. This shows the theme because his pride and disappointment cause him to be selfish, when he acts cruelly and leaves Doodle, which causes Doodle to die from the strain of keeping up with his brother. L:Based on the author’s development of the story and conflict within the narrator the message in The Scarlet Ibis is that pride, in some cases may be positive, but many times may cause a person to act cruel and selfish. Evidence Using quotes Analysis: Explains how examples support main idea Lead In: Phrase that sets up the quote Link: Connects analysis back to general topic

  5. Choice Reading Assignment

  6. Due Today: Nothing Tuesday, September 20, 2011 • Walk-In:Pick up an Elements of Literature textbook and get comfortable. • Learning Objective: • Students will collaborate with instructor and peers to improve their writing and understanding of literary terms, focusing in particular on theme. • Agenda: • Review • Independent Short Story Assignment Homework: Independent Short Story Assignment and Study for Reading Test

  7. Theme Theme: Rules for writing a THEME • The theme is usually not stated directly in the story at all; it is the author’s underlying message. • A theme must always be a statement; it must always be something that can be expressed in at least one sentence. • The theme reveals a truth about human behavior. • A theme statement does not refer to a specific work; it is a general statement about life. • The second person pronoun “you”—or any of its forms: your, you’re—is never used in a theme statement. • A theme statement doesn’t jump off the page and talk directly to the reader; it does NOT sound like a moral. • Subject + Authors Message = Theme

  8. Theme • Subject + Authors Message = Theme

  9. Main Idea: Introduces story, author and topic MEAL Model Evidence: First part provides background about the story M: In the story “The Scarlet Ibis,” by James Hurst, the theme, or author’s message is a person’s pride in ones own accomplishments may cause them to treat others cruelly. E. In the story the narrator is the older brother to Doodle. Doodle was born with a physical ailment that made it difficult to walk, run, and swim—all the activities that young children enjoy. The narrator was embarrassed by his brother and was determined to teach Doodle to do these things. He took pride in this, and says “but all of us must have something or someone to be proud of, and Doodle was mine. I did not know then that pride is a wonderful, terrible thing, a seed that bears two vines, life and death” (Hurst 318). Here the narrator begins to forget about what is best for Doodle, and focuses on his own emotions. Later on in the story this emotion has tragic results in the climax of the story when the Narrator, disappointed with Doodle’s progress, decides to run ahead and leave him behind in a storm, during one of Doodle’s training sessions. He says, “the knowledge that Doodle’s and my plans had come to naught was bitter, and that streak of cruelty within me wakened” (Hurst 323). A: Here the narrator’s pride causes him to feel disappointed in his and Doodle’s efforts and he decides to punish Doodle, without realizing that his brother may need his help. This shows the theme because his pride and disappointment cause him to be selfish, when he acts cruelly and leaves Doodle, which causes Doodle to die from the strain of keeping up with his brother. L:Based on the author’s development of the story and conflict within the narrator the message in The Scarlet Ibis is that pride, in some cases may be positive, but many times may cause a person to act cruel and selfish. Evidence Using quotes Analysis: Explains how examples support main idea Lead In: Phrase that sets up the quote Link: Connects analysis back to general topic

  10. Literary Terms: Elements of Plot • Protagonist • Antagonist • Point of View • Setting • Exposition • Rising Action • Climax • Falling Action • Resolution • Conflicts • Theme

  11. Word Study: Suffixes From verbs to nouns... • We can change verbs to nouns by adding the suffixes; 'tion','ism', 'ness', 'ist', ‘est’, or 'ity'. • Example - inject (verb) + tion = injection (noun) From nouns/adjectives to verbs… • We can change nouns/adjectives to verbs by adding the suffixes; ‘ize’, ‘ify/fy’ • Example - Pure (noun) + ify= Purify (verb) • Example – Glorious (adjective) + ify = Glorify (verb) From nouns/verbs to adjectives… • We can change nouns/verbs into adjectives by adding the suffixes; -able/-ible, -ious/-ous • Example – Glory (noun) + ous = Glorious (adjective) • Example – Rebel (verb) + ious = Rebellious (adjective)

  12. Due Today: Nothing Wed-Thurs, September 21-22, 2011 • Walk-In: Pick up an Elements of Literature textbook. • Learning Objective: • Students will demonstrate their reading comprehension proficiency, their literary terms application proficiency, word study proficiency, as well as understanding of Theme and how to write a MEAL paragraph. • Agenda: • American History Reading Test Homework: Independent Reading Assignment Due Friday

  13. Due Today: Independent Reading Assignment Friday, September 23, 2011 • Walk-In: Pick up an Elements of Literature textbook. If you did not finish your test sit on the right side of the room. If you finished your test, proofread your paragraph, and checked your answers, take out your independent reading assignment and sit on the left (window) side of the room. • Learning Objective: • Students will demonstrate their reading comprehension proficiency, their literary terms application proficiency, word study proficiency, as well as understanding of Theme and how to write a MEAL paragraph. • Students will enhance their understanding of a story through discussion of the plot structure, irony, imagery, and levels of questions. • Agenda: • Finish American History Reading Test • Independent Reading Assignment Book Club Homework: Nothing

  14. Independent Reading Book Club • Try to find people who read the same story as you that are also finished with their test. • Step 1: Share and compare your plot charts. • Step 2: Share, compare, and assess your predictions. Were they right or wrong? What details lead you on track or astray? • Step 3: Share and compare your answer to the questions at the end of the story. Skip the question on irony. • Step 4: Discuss the definitions of the different types of irony. Go back to the question on irony. How is it used in your story, what kind, and to what effect. • Step 5: Share and compare your example of imagery. • Step 6: Ask your group members your level 1, 2, and 3 questions and write down their answers. • If you cannot find a person that is finished with their test, pair up with one person. • Step 1: Summarize your story for your partner using your plot chart. Be sure to address every aspect. • Step 2: Share and compare your answer to the question focusing on irony at the end of the story. Identify what type of irony was used in your story (verbal, dramatic, situational). • Step 3: Share and compare your example of imagery. • Step 4: Share your level 3 questions to your partner and write down their answers.