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The Age of Jackson

The Age of Jackson

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The Age of Jackson

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  1. The Age of Jackson Section 3 Chapter 11

  2. Focus Questions • How was Jacksonian Democracy a sign of change in American politics? • How did tariff disputes lead to the nullification crisis, and how did President Jackson respond? • Why was President Jackson against a national bank, and how did his opposition affect the economy?

  3. Jacksonian Democracy • Many states began to allow non-property owning males to vote • Some parties started have nominating conventions– public meetings to select the party’s presidential and vice candidates • This democratic expansion became known as Jacksonian Democracy after Andrew Jackson

  4. Jacksonian Democracy • Jackson supporters believed that he would support the common man and rights of the slave states • The people in the party who thought that Clay and Adams stole the 1824 formed the Democratic Party • In 1828, Jackson ran for president as a Democrat and chose John C. Calhoun as his running mate

  5. Jackson’s Victory • Jackson and Calhoun won with a record number of votes • Jackson rewarding some of his supporters with government jobs– this known as the spoils system • Martin Van Buren was his secretary of state and one of Jackson’s strongest supporters • Jackson also relied on an informal group known as the kitchen cabinet (often times they met in the kitchen)

  6. Conflict over Tariffs • When it came to tariffs, northern states wanted higher tariffs and southern states wanted lower tariffs • This regional divide was Jackson’s first issue in office • In 1828 Congress passed the Tariff of Abominations (hateful things) was passed– it was a high tariff and southerners thought federal government was abusing their power

  7. The Nullification Crisis • John Calhoun (Vice President) wrote a statement in support of states’ rights • Those who favor states’ rights believe that the federal government is strictly limited by the Constitution • The dispute between state and federal government became known as the nullification crisis– states had the right to rebel if their rights were violated • Daniel Webster a Senator from Massachusetts did not agree

  8. The Nullification Crisis • South Carolina tested this in 1832 and Jackson promised to send troops if need be to make them follow the tested law • A compromise was reached and war was avoided

  9. The Second Bank of the United States • Jackson opposed the Second Bank of the United States that was formed in 1816 • In McCulloch v. Maryland, the Constitutionality of the bank came into question and the Supreme Court sided with Congress in allowing them to form a national bank

  10. The Second Bank of the United States • This case also determined that federal laws out weigh state laws • By the time Jackson had completed his presidency the national debt had lowered but he did not improve the economy

  11. Van Buren’s Presidency • In 1836, the Whig Party was formed from a group of Jackson’s opponents • The Whig’s ran four candidates in 1836 but with Jackson’s support the Democrat Martin Van Buren won

  12. Van Buren’s Presidency • In 1836, the Whig Party was formed from a group of Jackson’s opponents • The Whig’s ran four candidates in 1836 but with Jackson’s support the Democrat Martin Van Buren won • The Panic of 1837, hit America and led to a severe economic depression • Van Buren was blamed for the panic • The Whigs ran William Henry Harrison in 1840 and they finally won the presidency

  13. Focus Questions • How was Jacksonian Democracy a sign of change in American politics? • How did tariff disputes lead to the nullification crisis, and how did President Jackson respond? • Why was President Jackson against a national bank, and how did his opposition affect the economy?