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Building Chicago’s Aviation Future Presentation to IRTBA Emerging Leadership Program PowerPoint Presentation
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Building Chicago’s Aviation Future Presentation to IRTBA Emerging Leadership Program

Building Chicago’s Aviation Future Presentation to IRTBA Emerging Leadership Program

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Building Chicago’s Aviation Future Presentation to IRTBA Emerging Leadership Program

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  1. Building Chicago’s Aviation Future Presentation to IRTBA Emerging Leadership Program KHALED NAJA, P.E.CHIEF OPERATING OFFICERCHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION December 13, 2012

  2. TODAY’S PRESENTATION • Chicago Department of Aviation (CDA) Overview • O’Hare Modernization Program (OMP) Overview • OMP Case Study: Relocation of Irving Park Road, Union Pacific Railroad and Bensenville Ditch • Industry Leading Sustainability Initiatives

  3. CDA OVERVIEW

  4. CHICAGO DEPARTMENT OF AVIATION O’Hare and Midway International Airports 1,500 CDA employees Generate 540,000 jobs and $45 billion today OMP adds 195,000 jobs and $18 Billion to regional economy

  5. MIDWAY OVERVIEW More than 19 million passengers projected for 2012 250+ daily flights / Service to over 60 destinations New international service to Canada, Mexico #1 market for Southwest Airlines Fastest-growing U.S. airport by anna.aero News & Analysis

  6. O’HARE OVERVIEW • Nonstop service to about 200 cities worldwide • 50 passenger carriers operating out of 189 gates • 67.2 million passengers projected for 2012 Chicago-O’Hare NONSTOP International Markets • airberlin new service to Berlin on March 23, 2013 • Hainan Airlines new service to Beijing in 2Q 2013 • Qatar Airways new service to Doha in April 2013 6

  7. CDA SECTIONS Commissioner Design / Construction (OMP) Facilities Human Resources Safety / Security Planning/ Real Estate Communications Landside Operations Information Technology Legal/ IGA Concessions Finance Airside Operations Noise Environment Sustainability

  8. O’HARE FACILITIES • More than 7,000 acres • 4 Terminals, Bus/Shuttle Center, 6 level parking garage • Maintain 7 runways and associated taxiways/taxi-lanes in compliance w/ FAA Part 139 certification standards • Maintain all landside and airfield roadways, outlying buildings, and associated infrastructure • 5 sections: • Skilled Trades • 9 trades groups (carpenters, electricians, plumbers, etc.) • Heating & Refrigeration (H&R) Plant • Among largest in U.S. • Terminal Managers • Architectural/Landscaping • Work Management/Financial Services

  9. O’Hare Operations • Seven (7) operating runways, three parallels (12.69 miles total) • 52 miles of taxiways/taxilanes • 20 million sq. ft. of ramp area • Over 10,000 airfield lights and 960 signs • 880,000 annual departures and arrivals

  10. O’HARE AIR CARGO STATISTICS • Average of 1.5 million tons of air cargo handled annually • Number 2 U.S. cargo airport in 2011 by value of shipments (13% of U.S. total) • Number 7 U.S. cargo airport and number 20 in world in 2011 by tonnage

  11. O’HARE NORTHEAST CARGO CENTER • Nearly $200 million project • 65 acres, 820,000 s.f. of building space • Close access to I-90, I-190 & I-294 • Three buildings over three phases • Approximately 50% more capacity for jumbo jet freighters, including B747-8F aircraft • Green building commitment by developer, Aeroterm

  12. O’HARE MODERNIZATION PROGRAM (OMP) OVERVIEW

  13. Purpose of OMP • Reduce Delays • Increase Capacity • OMP will create 195,000 new jobs and add an additional $18 billion in annual economic activity on top of the 450,000 jobs and $38 billion in annual economic activity O'Hare already contributes to the Chicago region's economy

  14. O’HARE MODERNIZATION PROGRAM

  15. OMP Overview • $6.6 billion in 2001 dollars • One new runway • Relocation of 3 existing runways • Extension of 2 existing runways • New western terminal that: • Includes up up to 60 gates • Secure automated people mover systems transports passengers between terminals • Creates western entrance to O’Hare • Wetlands mitigation and land acquisition • On airport access roads and other enabling projects North Airfield South Airfield

  16. Program Status • Program announced – June 2001 • FAA initiated EIS – August 2002 • State of Illinois passed O’Hare Modernization Act – May 2003 • Design Work Began in February 2003 • Program Received Record of Decision (ROD) in September 2005 • Opened a 3,000 ft Extension on R/W 10-28 in September 2008 (Ahead of Schedule) • Commissioned a New North Airfield Air Traffic Control Tower and a New 7,500 ft Runway in November 2008 (On Schedule) • Started Design Work on Completion Phase Work in 2nd Quarter 2009 • City of Chicago and Village of Bensenville Reached Agreements on Demolition Work and Property Acquisition 4th Quarter 2009 • City substantially completed property demolition in 4th Quarter 2010 • City received FAA Letter Of Intent for $410 Million for Construction of Completion Phase Runways in 2nd Quarter 2010 • City received FAA approval to use Passenger Facility Charges for Completion Phase construction in 4th Quarter 2010

  17. Program Status(continued) • FAA Agreed to increase previous Completion Phase Letter of Intent by $155 million - 1st Quarter 2011 • City and Airlines reached agreement in 1st Quarter 2011 for partial funding for construction of Completion Phase Runways • Final legal challenges to City acquisition of St. Johannes Cemetery were dismissed 1st Quarter 2011 • City completed bond deal for Phase 2A Construction May 2011 Construction work began in June 2011 on North Airfield Phase 2A projects • City initiated construction work on the Runway 10C-28C Center project in June 2011. This is the final project for Phase 1 • FedEx relocation completed September 12, 2011 • Relocated Union Pacific Railroad in May 2012 • Completed Relocation of St. Johannes Cemetery in June 2012 (Almost 1,500 Burials) • Relocated Irving Park Road – October 2012

  18. PHASE 1 &COMPLETION PHASE 9L-27R Completed Nov. 2008 NATCT Completed Nov. 2008 9C-27C 2020 9R-27L Extension 2020 Taxiway LL 2018 10L-28R Extension Completed Sept. 2008 10C-28C 4th Quarter 2013 SATCT 4th Quarter 2015 10R-28L 4th Quarter 2015 Phase 1 Phase 2A Phase 2B 18 18

  19. Remaining South Airfield ProjectsPhase I and Completion Phase 2A SOUTH AIRFIELD AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWER SITE PREP SOUTH AIRFIELD AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL TOWER CEMETERY RELOCATION CARGO ACCESS ROAD RUNWAY 10C-28C CENTER RUNWAY 10R-28L EAST UTILITIES RUNWAY 10R-28L NAVAIDS RAILROAD RELOCATION RUNWAY 10R-28L NAVAIDS Under Design Under Construction as of Sept. 2012 Substantially Completed RUNWAY 10R-28L PAVING AND ELECTRICAL RUNWAY 10R-28L SITE PREP UNITED AIRLINES RAMP FEDEX RAMP IRVING PARK ROAD

  20. Earthwork Moved: 22.6 million cubic yards Ductbank Installed: 103 Miles Cable Pulled: 550 miles Storm Sewer Installed: 75 miles Asphalt Paving Placed: 1.4 million tons Concrete Paving Placed: 1.6 million square yards Construction statistics to date

  21. Funded OMP Projects OMP Phase 11 OMP Phase 2A 1 Phase 2A Funding Sources ($000) FAA LOI Grant $ 280,000 PFC Funds $ 365,000 GARBs $ 298,300 TOTAL $ 943,300 Funding Sources AIP Funds: FAA AIP entitlement and discretionary grants; NATCT payments FAA LOI Grant: Multi-year FAA Letter of Intent Grant; awarded for Phase 1 and Completion Phase (2A and 2B) PFC Funds: Passenger Facility Charge revenues ($4.50 level); stand-alone bonds, PAYGO, and PFC-backed GARBs GARBs: Airport Revenue Bonds; debt service paid with Airline Revenues Notes: 1OMP Phase 2A excludes remaining Phase 1 work included in the Phase 2A funding agreement. Phase 1 Funding Sources ($000) AIP Funds $ 74,013 FAA LOI Grant $ 300,255 PFC Funds $ 957,754 GARBs $1,860,619 TOTAL $3,192,641

  22. Construction Work on an active airfield

  23. Construction Work on an active airfield

  24. Construction Work on an active airfield

  25. Construction Work on an active airfield

  26. CASE STUDY: Relocation of the Union Pacific Railroad, Irving Park Road, and Bensenville Ditch “Planes, Trains and Automobiles”

  27. Property acquisition challenges • More than 500 properties outside the City Corporate Limits. • State Legislation gave City Quick Take Authority • Legal challenges delayed final acquisition of properties and demolition work. • OMP could not proceed with the relocation projects while litigation was still pending. SOUTHWEST AIRFIELD AREA

  28. Interim Solution to the Property acquisition delay • Relocate a section of the UPRR to a temporary configuration. • Requirements for the Interim Alignment. • Meet UPRR design standards • Allow Commissioning of the Runway 10L Extension • Support the construction to relocate the United Cargo and FedEx Cargo facilities. • Relocate Bensenville Ditch to an Interim Alignment

  29. Interim Solution to the Property acquisition delay (continued) • Construct a temporary road for access to St, Johannes Cemetery, Resthaven Cemetery, and the new FedEx facility. • These Interim Alignments reduced the litigation delays on the OMP by approximately 2 years

  30. Original Rail and Bensenville Ditch Pre-Construction Rail Interim Rail Final Rail Original Rail Original Bensenville Ditch FEDEX CARGO UNITED CARGO Runway 10L-28R Runway 10C-28C Runway 10R-28L

  31. Original Rail and Bensenville Ditch with Interim rail and Bensenville ditch Original Rail Interim Rail Original Bensenville Ditch Interim Bensenville Ditch FEDEX CARGO UNITED CARGO Runway 10L-28R Runway 10C-28C Runway 10R-28L

  32. Land acquisition Original Rail and Bensenville Ditch with Interim rail and Bensenville ditch Original Rail Interim Rail Original Bensenville Ditch Interim Bensenville Ditch FEDEX CARGO UNITED CARGO Runway 10L-28R Runway 10C-28C Runway 10R-28L

  33. Interim rail photography

  34. Demolition challenges • The OMP and the Village of Bensenville (VOB) settled litigation challenges in late 2009. • Settlement agreement required the OMP to; • Prepare a comprehensive demolition plan including requirements for environmental protection • Salvage infrastructure equipment for VOB • Evaluate impacts of property demolition on VOB infrastructure • Coordinate and communicate closely with VOB officials

  35. Demolition solutions • OMP and VOB finalized and executed a demolition plan. • Split the demolition work into 8 packages. Used prequalified demolition contractors. • Village used a web site to keep interested citizens updated. • Prior to demolition work, City allowed more than 40 agencies to use the area for emergency response training.

  36. OMP Bensenville Demolition PackagesSubstantially Completed December 2010 FINAL RAILROAD ALIGNMENT DEMOLITION PACKAGE 1 DEMOLITION PACKAGE 2 DEMOLITION PACKAGE 5 DEMOLITION PACKAGE 7 DEMOLITION PACKAGE 6 DEMOLITION PACKAGE 3 DEMOLITION PACKAGE 4

  37. Bensenville Emergency Training - Photography National Guard Decontamination area used during full-scale exercise drill Chicago Fire Dept fire training in the townhomes area Package 3 National Guard Decontamination area used during full-scale exercise drill Oak Brook police Department K-9 Unit in Package 7

  38. Bensenville Demolition Photography

  39. Railroad challenges • The permanent rail alignment required property transactions with the Union Pacific Railroad (UPRR), Canadian Pacific Railroad (CPRR) and Metra. • The OMP could not adversely impact rail operations during construction. • The crossing of the UPRR over CPRR tracks was governed by a 1912 agreement. • Our Design had to comply with railroad design requirements. Complex Property Swaps and Purchases

  40. Railroad solutions • OMP contracted with an attorney familiar with railroad operations and land transfers and made him an integral part of the project team. • The OMP project team worked with UPRR legal, operations, and engineering staff to develop a project agreement. • This agreement addressed UPRR design standards, access to UPRR property by OMP contractors, land transactions, and miscellaneous payments to UPRR. • The project team also finalized agreements with CPRR and Metra that included property purchases and access to railroad property.

  41. Railroad design challenges • New design must comply with all railroad design requirements. E.g. Track vertical gradient could not exceed 0.45%. • Four new bridges to replace existing bridges. One bridge replacement required a temporary shoo-fly bridge. • New bridge over Irving Park Road – no center point pier. 137’ - 3” through plate girder. 13’ – 2” tall girders. • Two span bridge on a skew angle of 50 degrees over 5 tracks of CPRR. Track alignment across bridge was within a curve and a spiral. • Another bridge crossed over a municipal street with adjacent commercial buildings extremely close to the bridge. • Runway Safety area, Glide Slope Critical Area, and protected runway approach surfaces constrained railroad design. (Pinch Point Area)

  42. Railroad design solutions • Project team worked closely with UPRR officials who had to approve final design of the Railroad and Bridges’ • Special fabrication and handling requirements for the 13’ – 2” high girders. • Split the overall project into four construction packages. • City and contractor worked with abutting property owners to minimize impacts of construction on commercial businesses. • Design team solved pinch point problem with retaining walls and box culverts.

  43. Project ChallengesPinch Point Area Retaining Walls Box Culverts

  44. Irving park road bridgephotography

  45. railroad Construction Photography • UPRR RAIL RELOCATION

  46. Old and New Bridges

  47. IDOT Challenges • Design realigned Irving Park Road (IPR) and Bensenville Ditch (BVD). • Coordinate road design with Elgin O’Hare Western Bypass (EOWB) concept. • Widen railroad bridge at Green Street per IDOT agreement. • DesignUPRR and IPR grade separation with anticipation IDOT will grade separate Canadian Pacific RR at a later date. • Complete property transfer exchanging rights-of-way.

  48. IDOT solutions • Numerous meetings with IDOT throughout the design. • Executed Memorandum of Agreement for bridge widening. • Made minor design changes in anticipation of future EOWB interchanges. • Designed UPRR crossing over IPR so IDOT can build the CPRR bridge crossing at a later date.

  49. Proposed Bridge elevations Original OMP Design Revised Design based in IDOT Request Railroad Bridge over Green Avenue

  50. Future Western Access • $2B Program to expand access on West side of O’Hare • Connections at: • Irving Park Rd • Franklin Ave • Overpasses at: • Irving Park Rd • Franklin Ave/UPRR • Underpass at • Bensenville Yard • Relocated UPRR Future Western Bypass Alignment Bensenville Ditch Irving Park Road Railroad