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Yukon River Watershed

Yukon River Watershed

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Yukon River Watershed

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  1. Sustainable Lands Department: Brownfields Tribal Response2007 Alaska Forum on the EnvironmentPresented bySonta Hamilton, Environmental Specialist 815 2nd Ave., Suite 201Fairbanks, AK 99701(907) 451-2549www.yritwc.com/brownfield/

  2. Yukon River Watershed • Draining area = 330,000 square miles • Distance from headwaters to mouth = 2,300 miles • Crosses international border • 4th largest basin in North America • Traditional homeland of 74 Tribes & First Nations

  3. Contamination within the Watershed Yukon River watershed has a history of… • mining • military • BIA schools • canneries • other industries

  4. Water Quality BackHaul/Solid Waste Brownfields Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council • Founded in 1997 by Indigenous leaders • Coalition of 66 Tribes & First Nations • 50 Year Vision: • To be able to drink water directly from the Yukon River YRITWC Programs: BackHaul/Solid Waste Water Quality Brownfields Advocacy Education Contaminants Energy

  5. Overview: • Funded since 2005 • 1 full-time staff in Fairbanks • Focus Areas: • Provide relevant training • Inventory potential brownfield sites • Maintain a record of sites for public access • Assist with environmental assessment of priority sites YRITWC Brownfields Tribal Response Working to improve the Yukon River watershed one site at a time

  6. Highlights of 2005-07:Established Partnerships with 36 Villages Huslia Tribal Council Iqurmiut Tribal Council Kaltag Tribal Council Kotlik Traditional Council Koyukuk Tribal Council Manley Village Council Native Village of Bill Moore’s Slough Native Village of St. Michael Native Village of Tanacross Nenana Native Council Nulato Tribal Council Paimiut Traditional Council Pilot Station Traditional Council Pitka’s Point Traditional Council Ruby Tribal Council Scammon Bay Traditional Council Shageluk IRA Council Stebbins IRA Council Venetie Village Council Yupiit of Andreafski Alakanuk Traditional Council Alatna Village Council Algaaciq Tribal Government Allakaket Traditional Council Arctic Village Council Asa’carsarmiut Tribal Council Beaver Village Council Birch Creek Tribal Council Chevak Native Village Chuloonawick Native Village Dot Lake Village Council Emmonak Traditional Council Evansville Tribal Council Gwichyaa Gwich’in Tribal Gov’t. Grayling IRA Council Hamilton Tribal Council Holy Cross Traditional Council Hooper Bay Native Village Hughes Village Council Koyukuk Shaktoolik Stebbins St. Michael Pilot Station Pitka’s Point St. Mary’s

  7. Highlights of 2005-07:Facilitated Community Brownfield Trainings • Tribal Brownfields Workshops • Contaminated Site Education (schools, culture camps) • Hazardous Waste & Emergency Response • Training

  8. Highlights of 2005-07:DevelopedInventory of Potential Brownfields 229 potential brownfields sites documented • Common Sites • Petroleum (ex: tank farms, fuel storage areas) • Dumps (ex: open, illegal) • Lead/Asbestos Containing Buildings (ex: BIA schools, military facilities)

  9. Highlights of 2005-07:Increased # of Environmental Assessments Washeteria – Arctic Village, AK Eroding Dump – Alakanuk, AK Eroding Dump – Nenana, AK Drum Stockpile – Holy Cross, AK

  10. What Makes Brownfields in Alaska Unique? • 229 federally recognized tribes in Alaska • Multiple governing bodies in most villages • tribal governments, municipalities, village & regional corporations • Complex land ownership • Creative redevelopment/reuse goals

  11. Questions or Comments? Thank you! Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council Brownfields Tribal Response Program815 2nd Ave., Suite 201Fairbanks, AK 99701(907) 451-2530www.yritwc.com/brownfield/