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Functional Behavior Assessment Indirect Assessment: Annie’s Story
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Functional Behavior Assessment Indirect Assessment: Annie’s Story

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  1. Functional Behavior Assessment Indirect Assessment: Annie’s Story For more information: Contact Amanda Little, Ph.D.amandalittle@utexas.edu

  2. Annie’s Story • Annie is a three-year-old diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. She loves playing on the computer, music, ocean animals and swimming. She has many strengths, which were identified at her PCP meeting and include: • Adorable • Smart • Good memory • Happy • Strong-willed • Energetic

  3. Annie’s Story • Annie’s family has difficulty taking her into the community due to her exhibiting challenging behaviors, being “impatient”, running away or grabbing items that aren’t hers. She has difficulty waiting in line. • Let’s listen to what her mom has to say. (12 minutes) • What challenging behaviors might you look for?

  4. Functional Behavior Assessment • Indirect Measures • Informal Interview with Mother • Motivation Assessment Scale • The TOOL • Direct Measures • Partial Interval Data Recording during Brushing Teeth Routine • Family Data Collection Sheet

  5. What are Routines? • Routines are daily, habitual activities that occur • Routines allow teaching to occur within familiar activities and following simple and multi-step instructions • Patterns and routines are part of bigger routines • When we are out of our routines we may become irritable and crave our normal routines again • Routines may be problematic if we can not vary from them—e.g. some children with autism • Bedtime routines, for example those involving a bath, book, and “getting tucked in”, provide children with security • Help children be more independent and manage their behavior

  6. Examples of Routines • Mealtime • Bedtime • Morning routine • Schedule of the day • Bathroom routine • What are your routines? • What routines might you intervene on with Annie?

  7. Baseline • Baseline—brushing teeth routine (5 minutes) • Start: Instruction to brush teeth (e.g., “Time to brush teeth”) • End: routine ends after spitting and/or putting toothbrush away or mom saying “all done” • Possible challenging behavior definitions: • Elopement—leaving the sink area beyond 2 feet or attempt stopped by mom or not being in the bathroom unless it is a choice • noncompliance—not following an instruction within 2 seconds of it being given, taking toothbrush out of mouth for at least 2 seconds which may include saying “no” or turning her head • Delaying—not engaging in the behavior as instructed or implied (e.g., steps of the brushing teeth routine) for at least 2 seconds. This includes engaging in or asking for other items or activities, engaging in conversation, etc.)

  8. Data Collection Activity • Create a data collection sheet that the family will use to provide you with data on challenging behaviors • Discuss how you would teach the family or other team members how/when/where to take the data

  9. Next Step: Hypothesis Statement and Competing Behavior Diagram