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Nonterm Academic Calendars and Delivering Title IV Aid PowerPoint Presentation
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Nonterm Academic Calendars and Delivering Title IV Aid

Nonterm Academic Calendars and Delivering Title IV Aid

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Nonterm Academic Calendars and Delivering Title IV Aid

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  1. Fred Sellers Office of Postsecondary Education Nonterm Academic Calendarsand Delivering Title IV Aid Session 34 December 9, 2004

  2. Overview Session Agenda • Overview • Getting Started • Program Requirements • Case Studies • Additional Handouts • Toolbox • Additional Case Studies

  3. Overview • Focus • Nonterm educational programs • Federal Pell Grant Program • Loan Programs: FFEL and DL • Determination of payment amounts • Disbursement dates

  4. Overview • Engaging the Nontraditional • Expectations • Frustrations • Help

  5. Getting Started

  6. Getting Started For Each Academic Program • Academic calendar • Program’s weeks of instructional time • Definitions for Title IV • Payment periods • Loan periods

  7. Term and Nonterm • A Term • Definition: A discrete period of time during which all courses in the term are scheduled to begin and end • Within a term: full-length courses, compressed courses or modules, courses offered sequentially

  8. Term and Nonterm Academic calendar no longer term-based • All classes do not start and stop within the beginning and end dates of the term.

  9. Term and Nonterm Nonterm Programs • Courses do not all begin and end within a discrete period of time and may— • Contain self-paced or independent study courses without fixed timeframes; or • Consist of sequential courses that do not have to begin and end within a term. • Clock-hour programs are always treated as nonterm.

  10. Term and Nonterm Case Study #1 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours 5 weeks 4 hours • A certificate program consists of 6 courses or modules, each 5 weeks of instructional time in length with 4 semester hours in each module. • Is this program a nonterm or term-based program?  Nonterm?  2 semesters?  3 10-week nonstandard terms?  6 5-week nonstandard terms?  Some other combination of modules into terms?

  11. Term and Nonterm Case Study #2 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours • A bachelor’s degree program consists of 3 semester- hour courses that students may start and complete at their own pace without any requirement that a student complete a course or group of courses within a specified time-frame. • Is this program a nonterm or term-based program?

  12. Term and Nonterm Case Study #3 Fall Spring Session A – 15 weeks Session B – 15 weeks Session C – 11 weeks Session D – 11 weeks Session E – 11 weeks S. F – 8 weeks S. G – 8 weeks S. H – 8 weeks S. I – 8 weeks • If a student is able to register at the same time for classes for his or her educational program in any of these sessions, is it a term-based program? • Can there be an academic calendar that is term-based with courses offered in these sessions?

  13. Fall Spring Session A – 15 weeks Session B – 15 weeks Term and Nonterm Case Study #4 S. C – 8 weeks S. E – 8 weeks S. D – 8 weeks S. F – 8 weeks S. G – 5 w S. H – 5 w S. I – 5 w S. J – 5 w S. K – 5 w S. L – 5 w • If a student is able to register at the same time for classes in any of these sessions for his or her educational program, is it a term-based program? • Can there be an academic calendar that is term-based with courses offered in these sessions?

  14. Nonterm Academic Progress • Progress is measured by the number of credit hours or clock hours successfully completed. • Payment Period • Payment periods are divisions of the academic program based on hours and, if credit hours, weeks of instructional time.

  15. Nonterm Enrollment Status • Full-time = academic year definition for credit hour programs • Full-time = at least 24 clock hours per calendar week • Still need to determine the rate at which a student is completing a program, for example, at least half-time. • Must make this determination for programs less than an academic year in length. Students in these programs are not automatically considered full-time.

  16. Program Requirements

  17. Program Requirements Federal Pell Grant Program • Scheduled award • Annual award • Payment period • Pell formulas

  18. Program Requirements • Loan Programs - FFEL and DL Consider • Academic year • Payment periods • Weeks of instructional time • Calendar time • Credit or clock hours • May determine • Loan period • Delivery of proceeds • Loan maximums

  19. Nonterm Enrollment Status • Pell • Full-time students’ progress in the program for all payment period calculations • Less-than-half-time for cost of attendance • Loans • Full-time students’ progress in the program can affect loan period calendar-time length • Less-than-half-time for determining eligibility

  20. Nonterm Pell Formula • Pell formula 4 must be used.

  21. Nonterm FFEL and DL - Loan Period • The minimum loan period is the lesser of—  The academic year, or  The length of the program. • If an educational program is greater than an academic year in length, the remaining portion of the student’s program that is less than an academic year in length may be a loan period. • A loan period may not exceed 12 calendar months.

  22. Nonterm FFEL and DL - Delivery • The school may not deliver the second half of the loan proceeds until the later of—  The calendar midpoint between the first and last scheduled days of the loan period; or  The date that the student has completed half of the academic coursework in the loan period.

  23. Case Study #1

  24. Case Study #1 • Illustrates determining Pell and loans for a nonterm self-paced, credit-hour program • Also illustrates-- • Impact of completing coursework ahead of scheduled completion • Impact of overlapping loan period for a transfer student

  25. Case Study #1 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours • Academic calendar = nonterm, 120 semester hours, self-paced • Academic year = 24 semester hours and 40 weeks of instructional time • Full-time = 24 semester hours over 40 weeks of instructional time

  26. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 • Payment period = 12 semester hours and 20 weeks of instructional time. • Most full-time students are completing the hours in the defined academic year in 40 weeks of instructional time.

  27. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Pell • Formula 4 Pell payment for a payment period calculation Step 1 Determining a student’s Scheduled Award

  28. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Pell Step 2 Multiplying the Scheduled Award by the lesser of either “one” or the following fraction: The number of weeks of instructional time required for a full-time student to complete the lesser of the clock or credit hours in the program or the academic year The number of weeks of instructional time in the program’s academic year

  29. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Pell Step 3 The result of Step 2 multiplied by: The number of credit or clock hours in a payment period = payment for The number of credit or clock hours a payment in the program’s academic year period

  30. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Pell • Student with a Scheduled Award of $4,000 • Payment for a payment period calculation Step 1 Scheduled Award = $4,000 Step 2 40  $4,000 = $4,000 40 

  31. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Pell Step 3 12$4,000 = $2,000 24 

  32. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Start date1st Pell disbursement Week 15 Week 20 2nd Pell disbursement Case Study #1 Pell • Student completes the first 12 semester hours in 15 weeks of instructional time. • School may disburse second Pell only after the student completes 20 weeks of instructional time.

  33. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Loans Start date End date • The loan period is based on using a borrower-based academic year (BBAY). • The loan period is the calendar-time period in which the student is expected to complete an academic year.

  34. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Loans loan period before transfer Start date End date Week 15 Week 20 • As a transfer student with an overlapping loan period from the prior enrollment, the student is eligible for an amount determined by subtracting the gross amount received at the prior institution from the loan limit for the new loan. • Since the program must use BBAY, the institution must certify the reduced loan amount for an academic year.

  35. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Case Study #1 Loans End date Start date 1st loan disbursement Week 15 Week 20 Midpoint 2nd loan disbursement • The calendar midpoint of the loan period is at the end of the 20th week of instructional time. • The school may deliver the second loan disbursement after the calendar midpoint of the loan period.

  36. 12 semester hours 20 weeks 12 semester hours 20 weeks Start date1st Pell disbursement Week 15 Week 20 2nd Pell disbursement Case Study #1 Pell and Loans End date Midpoint 2nd loan disbursement 1st loan disbursement • Pell and loan disbursements coincide.

  37. Case Study #2

  38. Case Study #2 • Illustrates determining Pell and loans for a nonterm, credit-hour program with a fixed schedule • Also illustrates-- • Program less than an academic year based on only one measure • Impact of compressed coursework in a program less than an academic year in length • Impact of failing a course on progressing to the next payment period and to a loan disbursement

  39. Case Study #2 28 semester hours 28 weeks of instructional time • An undergraduate certificate program. • The program is not self-paced. • Students earn 28 semester hours over 28 weeks of instructional time. • Students earn semester hours in 2-hour increments.

  40. Case Study #2 28 semester hours 28 weeks of instructional time • Academic year = 24 semester hours and 30 weeks of instructional time • Full-time = 24 semester hours over 30 weeks of instructional time

  41. 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Case Study #2 • Payment periods = 14 semester hours and 14 weeks of instructional time

  42. 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Case Study #2 Pell • Formula 4 for Pell payment for a payment period calculation • Student with a Scheduled Award of $4,000

  43. 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Case Study #2 Pell • For Pell full-time students are completing the hours in the academic year in 24 weeks of instructional time. 24/28 28 = 24 hours in academic year weeks of instructional time hours in the program for most full-time students to complete the hours in the program  

  44. 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Case Study #2 Pell • Payment for a payment period calculation for each payment period in the program Step 1 Scheduled Award = $4,000 Step 2 24  $4,000 = $3,200 30 Step 3 14$3,200 = $1,866.66 ($1,867 and $1,866 24 for each p.p.)  

  45. 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Case Study #2 Pell Start date1st Pell disbursement 2nd Pell disbursement • The student receives two Pell disbursements that total $3,733 out of a $4,000 Scheduled Award.

  46. 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Case Study #2 Loans Mid-point 1st loan disbursement 2nd loan disbursement • The loan period is for the program which is less than an academic year in length. • The institution must prorate the loan limit for the loan by 28/30, the lesser of wks in program (28)/wks in ac yr (30) or hrs in program (28)/hrs in ac yr (24)

  47. 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Case Study #2 Pell and Loans Mid-point 2nd Pell disbursement Start date1st Pell disbursement 2nd loan disbursement 1st loan disbursement • Pell and loan disbursements coincide.

  48. Case Study #2 Pell and Loans Expected end of p.p. and midpoint 14 hours 14 weeks 14 hours 14 weeks Mid-point Calendar end date of loan period Start date1st Pell disbursement 2nd Pell disbursement 2nd loan disbursement 1st loan disbursement • Assume our student fails a two-hour course in the first payment period. • The institution may not disburse the student’s 2nd Pell and loan disbursements until the student has successfully completed 14 hours.

  49. Case Study #3

  50. Case Study #3 • Illustrates determining Pell and loans for a nonterm, credit-hour program with a fixed schedule • Also illustrates-- • Program greater than an academic year in length • Credit-hour/clock-hour conversion • Impact of compressed coursework • Impact of alternate definition of academic year