Download
adopt a molecule n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Adopt-A-Molecule PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Adopt-A-Molecule

Adopt-A-Molecule

169 Vues Download Presentation
Télécharger la présentation

Adopt-A-Molecule

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Adopt-A-Molecule A guided Inquiry for Increasing Student Interest in Organic Chemistry Paul Musgrave

  2. Why? • What? • How? Development of the Project

  3. WHY?

  4. Why did we need to develop this project? • Generateinterest and increase motivation for learning organic chemistry. • Application of information learned in class to molecules in the “real world”. • Build research skills.

  5. Why a term project? • Application of new knowledge as it was learned. • Application of knowledge to chemically important molecules.

  6. WHAT?

  7. What did we envision? • A project that would spark the interest of the students. • Encourage creativity. • Teaching BY the students. • Application of knowledge in a way that demonstrated relevance in “real world”.

  8. General Questions. • Specific Questions. • Molecule Profile. • Comparison Questions. What did the project entail?

  9. Project Timeline

  10. HOW?

  11. How did we select the molecules? • Identification of several important classes of chemicals. • Range of topics. • Not just biologically active compounds.

  12. Classes of Chemicals • Antibiotics • Neurotransmitters/Hormones • Artificial Sweeteners • Illegal/Dangerous Drugs • Pain Medications • Chemicals found in Food • Chemicals found in Cosmetics • Toxins • Dyes • Pesticides • Others

  13. Comparable in size and complexity. • Structure that could be discussed within the context of the course. How did we select the molecules?

  14. How were general questions developed? • Applicable to all molecules. • Cover various Student Learning Outcomes (SLO). • Sequenced in order to parallel topics being covered in lecture.

  15. Examples of General Questions • What is the IUPAC name? • What is the melting point? • What functional groups are present? • Number of chiral centers? • Are chiral centers of R or S configuration?

  16. How were specific questions developed? • Consider specific characteristics unique to molecule. • Importance of molecule. • Higher level thinking: drawing connections to other disciplines.

  17. Examples of Specific Questions • How much strain do you think is on the 4-membered ring? • What should the bond angles be, based on the hybridization of these atoms? • How might this contribute to the reactivity of the molecule?

  18. How were comparison questions developed? • Scrutinize profiles for all molecules in order to answer questions. • Compare and contrast properties of different molecules. • Learn interesting information about a variety of molecules.

  19. Students are resourceful. • Excellent quality of Molecule Profiles. • Students’ positive reaction to project. Outcomes

  20. Did everything go according to plan? • General Questions. • Specific Questions. • Grading of Comparison Questions.

  21. Future Considerations • Logical method of delivery for specific questions. • New system of grading for comparison questions.

  22. Last Thoughts • Students learned to connect concepts learned in class with “real world” applications. • Skills gained prepare students for future endeavors.