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Extreme Sports
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Extreme Sports

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  1. Extreme Sports Expository Reading and Writing Course

  2. Cage Fighting / MMA 1

  3. Street Luge 1

  4. Skateboarding 1

  5. X - Games 1

  6. More X Games 1

  7. X Games / Snowboarding 1

  8. Hangliding / Parasailing ^^^Over Everest!!^^^

  9. Base Jumping / Wingsuit Flying

  10. Pair / Share • Why do you think people are attracted to extreme sport activities? • Now that you’ve discussed the whys, what are the potential outcomes to participating in extreme sports? 1

  11. Background Information • Look at the pictures in Claire Davidson’s article “The World’s Most Dangerous Sports.” Do they frighten you? • Do they motivate you to learn more about any sport? 1

  12. Let’s Read! • “The World’s Most Dangerous Sports” (first 9 paragraphs) • In groups, read your assigned section and summarize or paraphrase that section – in writing. Do a good job, because…. • Each group will present their summaries to the rest of the class. See why I told you to do a good job?  2

  13. What do you think? • Now that you’ve read it, what do you think is the purpose of Ms. Davidson’s article? • Is it a warning? Is it merely informative? Etc…. 2

  14. Write a short paragraph explaining which extreme sport would be the most exciting or frightening to you. • Which would you be least or most likely to participate in? • Why or why not? 2

  15. Brainstorm!!!! What are some words that you associate with extreme sports? 2

  16. Are extreme sports a good idea? Why or why not? 2

  17. Surveying The Text • What does the title “Extreme Sports Not About Risk-Taking: Study” tell you about the author’s point of view on the dangers and reasons people participate in extreme sports? • What is the purpose of the article? 2

  18. Surveying the Text • What does the title “Camp For Kids With Autism Offers Extreme Therapy” suggest about the author’s position or point of view on the dangers and reasons people participate in extreme sports? • What is the purpose of the article? 2

  19. Surveying the Text • What does the title “A Solemn Warning to Wingsuit Flyers” by Lola Jones suggest about the author’s position or point of view on the dangers and reasons people participate in extreme sports? • What do you feel is the purpose of the article? 2

  20. Surveying the Text • On the basis of the title “A Solemn Warning to Wingsuit Flyers,” what do you think the author’s position will be? • Consider the source: is it a blog, an editorial, or an informational report? 2

  21. Surveying the Text • Based on the titles, in what ways do you tnink Jones’ article will be similar or different to the Donvan article, “Camp for kids with Autism Offers Extreme Therapy”? • In what ways will it be different? 2

  22. Making Predictions and Asking Questions • Considering the article “Extreme Sports Not About Risk-taking: Study,” what arguments do you think the author will make? • Let’s read the first four paragraphs. • Where does the introduction end in “Extreme Sports Not About Risk-taking: Study? 3

  23. Making Predictions and Asking Questions • Let’s read the first three paragraphs of “A Solemn Warning To Wingsuit Flyers.” • According to the text, was your original prediction about the author’s content and purpose correct? • Where does the introduction end in this article? 3

  24. Making Predictions and Asking Questions • Let’s read the first two paragraphs of ABC News’ “Camp for Kids with Autism Offers Extreme Therapy.” • What question would you most like to ask Donvan? Maybe something like:What is autism? What does autism have to do with taking extreme risks? 3

  25. Making Predictions and Asking Questions • In the last paragraph of Donvan’s article, what word or phrase(s) seem to give his argument ethos, or credibility? He offers proof because he states that the “…sign the camp works: Most of the campers come back.” 3

  26. Making Predictions and Asking Questions • Reword the titles and subtitles and turn them into questions to be answered after you read the full articles. What is the solemn warning to Wingsuit Flyers? Are Extreme Sports about the risk taking?How does the camp benefit kids with autism? 3

  27. Making Predictions and Asking Questions • Let’s read the last paragraphs of each of the articles. • How are they different? Jones: Ends with condolences to those close to Robson. Donvan: Ends with praise for the camp and it’s success. Extreme Sports not about the risk ends with testimony acknowledging people for different reasons other than an adrenaline rush. 3

  28. Making Predictions and Asking Questions • What is the source of each article (magazine, journal, blog, newspaper, etc.) – and why does it matter? 3

  29. Introducing Key Vocabulary those addicted to the rush adrenaline produces when taking risks or facing danger An idea or affliction causing suffering to someone ignore internal warning signs Our natural resistance to risk Trait linked to our DNA Condition in which stimulation drastically affects a person’s behavior instinctive Not official 4

  30. Semantic Map • In groups, create a semantic map for each of the vocabulary terms on the chart. For Example: adrenaline junkie Activity: Base Jumping Wingsuit Flying Parasailing Reason: Thrill Challenge Defy death Result: Personal Challenge Bucket List Live Like Larry 4

  31. First Reading – “Extreme Sports Not About Risk-taking: Study • Let’s finally read all of these articles in their entirety, starting with “Extreme Sports Not About Risk-taking: Study” • Of your original predictions, which were right? Which did you have to modify as you reread the article? 5

  32. First Reading – “Extreme Sports Not About Risk-taking: Study” • Identify the sentence that includes the main idea of the article. Paragraph 3: “Dr. Brymer found that, although the image of those who take part in extreme sports was that of risk-takers and adrenaline junkies, the opposite was true.” 5

  33. First Reading – “A Solemn Warning to Wingsuit Flyers” • SAY / MEAN / MATTER: What does it SAY, what does it MEAN, and why does it MATTER? • Complete the chart on to answer these questions: Does the Lola Jones have a position or bias on the issue? What, if anything, does Jones suggest needs to be done about the issue?What did she SAY?What did she MEAN?Why does it MATTER? 5

  34. First Reading – “Camp for Kids with Autism Offers Extreme Therapy” • Select one phrase, statement or fact that surprised you about kids with autism. • Why did it surprise you? • What does it SAY / MEAN / MATTER? 5

  35. First Reading: Say/Mean/Matter • You’ve identified some important facts or points from each of the articles. Using the chart, discuss in groups what those facts and points actually “mean” in regards to the issue, and how or why it is important. What does it Say / Mean / Matter?

  36. First Reading: Say / Mean / Matter You’ve identified some important facts or points from each of the articles in the previous activity. In groups, and using the following table, discuss what the facts and points actually “mean” in regards to the issue, and why or how it is important to the issue. After a bit, we’ll be sharing our findings…. 6

  37. First Reading – Say / Mean / Matter Wingsuit flying is dangerous Be very experienced in a related sport before trying Implies that people need to make up their own mind if this is for them or not “Solemn Warning” Jones Paragraph 9 “It is an inherently dangerous sport, but a sport participated in by people with huge skydiving experience…” “Camp for kids with autism….”, Para. 24 Doesn’t want them to struggle too much He wants them to achieve difficult goals, but not push themselves too far Shows he has the kids’ best interests in mind. “Gilstrap wants campers to struggle, but only so much.” 6

  38. Looking Closely at Language:Loaded Words Does anyone remember recently talking about words that have a negative or positive connotation? Anyone? Anyone? “Loaded words” are words or phrases that reveal an author’s bias on an issue or point in a text. 6

  39. Looking Closely at LanguageLoaded Words • If we scan the article “Extreme Sports Not About Risk Taking” we can look for “loaded words” that clearly show that the author has an opinion or bias about a fact or piece of information. 6

  40. Looking Closely at LanguageLoaded Words Reveals some in society may have a negative connotation towards extreme sports participation Adrenaline Junkies People who crave adrenaline “Extreme Sports…” In groups, scan through the articles and see if you can find more loaded words. Find at least two per article! 6

  41. Rereading The TextI-Chart • As you reread the articles, complete the following I-Chart to help compare and contrast key ideas from the articles so each author’s position to significant issues presented and the points each author makes about the issues can be analyzed. • This I-Chart asks three questions that each article addresses in some way.

  42. I-Chart

  43. Rereading and Annotating the Text • So let’s reread Davidson’s article and make annotations to identify the following: • Draw a line where the Introduction ends. Where does the author stop making general statements and begin making a specific point about extreme sports?

  44. Rereading and Annotating the Text 2. What is the issue or problem being addressed? • Label each point or topic sentence at the beginning of each sentence in either the margin or in the space between each line. • Label the first point P1, the second P2 and so on.

  45. Rereading and Annotating the Text 3. Author’s supporting evidence • Use parenthesis { } to identify the facts, opinions and comments the text provides to support each point. • The { } should begin at the end of one point and include each supporting commentary until the next point begins. • The { } should stretch down the paper until the next point begins, where you label the second point, P2

  46. Rereading and Annotating the Text 4. Now draw a line where the Conclusion begins. • See how easy this can be?

  47. Considering the Structure of the Text Organization • As you reread the texts, you are to evaluate the organization of each author’s argument or text. • Was the information presented in a plot line, like a narrative text or story? • Was a problem stated, then solutions discussed, or were things paired in a cause and effect organization: problem statement then results, effects or outcomes of the issue or events?

  48. Considering the Structure of the Text Organization • So let’s answer the following questions: • How was Jones’ article “A Solemn Warning to Wingsuit Flyers,” organized? Sequential – gives background information on Robson, his qualifications, then the facts behind his death.

  49. Considering the Structure of the Text Organization • How was Donvan’s article organized? Is there a sequence of events or does he begin by identifying a problem and stating what the Camp does for the kids? Problem/ solution – autism is defined; kids are mentioned that are diagnosed with it; how the camps benefits (effects) them is discussed.

  50. Considering the Structure of the Text Organization • How was the Extreme Sports Not About Risk-taking: Study” article organized? Cause and Effect. States beliefs of why people participate in extreme sports, then states results of study to prove/disprove.