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Community Building and Crime Response: “Our Neighborhood: a Safe and Beautiful Place” PowerPoint Presentation
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Community Building and Crime Response: “Our Neighborhood: a Safe and Beautiful Place”

Community Building and Crime Response: “Our Neighborhood: a Safe and Beautiful Place”

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Community Building and Crime Response: “Our Neighborhood: a Safe and Beautiful Place”

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  1. Community Building and Crime Response:“Our Neighborhood: a Safe and Beautiful Place”

  2. Madison’s: CBCR Our Neighborhood - A Safe and Beautiful PlaceYouth Mentoring RFP Application Workshop 1. Welcome and Introductions • Review of DOJ / CBCR Our Neighborhood - A Safe and Beautiful Place Initiative • Guidelines and Concepts • Contractual and Federal Funding Requirements • Application Process • Committee Process and Timelines • Contracting Process and Reporting

  3. CBCR “Our Neighborhood: A Safe and Beautiful Place” History of Project & Planning Phase Identified Priorities for Implementation (3pillars) Stephanie Bradley Wilson, Common Wealth Director-Health Equity & Violence Prevention LT. Mike Hanson West District, MPD

  4. “Our Neighborhood: A Safe and Beautiful Place”. This plan identifies three “program pillars” that will work together to reduce crime and improve underlying social conditions that contribute to crime: • Increased guardianship (including increasing opportunities for mentoring and the Safe Passage program.) • Support for struggling parents: FAST program, Families and schools together • Increase Community policing.

  5. Mentoring Resources https://www.mentoring.org/images/uploads/Final_Elements_Publication_Fourth.pdf Contact Person Hugh Wing, Community Development Specialist 266-6245, hwing@cityofmadison.com

  6. Geographic Boundary Defining Madison’s Westside for the Purpose of this RFP 1—Park Edge/Park Ridge 2—Raymond-McKenna 3—Raymond Road 4—Theresa Terrace

  7. Funds available: Individual Mentoring Group Mentoring Up to $45,000 $60,000 available for Group mentoring per year for 10 - 12 youth 18 month contracts • Up to $60,000 - $100,000 available for individual mentoring for 12 - 20 youth • 18 month contracts

  8. Youth Mentoring Programs for Middle and High School youth Individual Mentoring Group Mentoring A small group of adults mentoring a larger group of youth. For example, 3 adults mentoring 10 youth 2 - 4 contacts per month Minimum 18 month commitment • One adult matched to one young person. • 4 - 10 contacts per month (minimum 1 a week) • Minimum 18 month commitment

  9. Required Program Features • Commitment to positive youth development, violence reduction and connectedness as an overall goals. • Intentional program design with identified program standards and outcomes. • Individual mentoring for middle and high school age youth or Community based group-mentoring opportunities for middle school age youth. • Support young people’s efforts to celebrate their identities and explore issues that are relevant to their everyday life. • Commitment to training and continuous improvement for service delivery. • Emphasis on youth and parent voices in the mentoring relationship.

  10. Strong proposals will include descriptions of the following STRATEGIES that align with selected best practices: • RECRUITMENT • SCREENING • TRAINING • MATCHING AND INITIATING • MONITORING AND SUPPORT • FAMILY ENGAGEMENT* • STRUCTURED ACTIVITIES* • TRANSITION • SUSTAINABILITY*

  11. Contractual and Federal Funding Requirements The source of funds for the mentoring Initiative are Federal Funds awarded through the Department of Justice, to achieve outcomes required to reduce crime and improve social conditions that contribute to crime. Federal requirements are a significant additional set of standards and policies – specifically: • Requirements re: program design • Federal Civil Rights Laws • Financial documentation • Training resources and requirements • limitations on allowable expenses (for example- no food can be billed to the grant ) Funds are available for January 2019 – September 2020

  12. Time line • DateRFP Activity • January 11, 2019 Release of RFP • January 14, 2019 Mandatory Application Workshops • January 25, 2019 Deadline for scheduling consult with city staff in lieu of workshop • 12:00 p.m. (CST) Feb 11, 2019 DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF PROPOSALS • Feb 18, 2019 Applicant Presentations • March 19, 2019 Common Council Approval • March 20, 2019 Notification of Award • April 1, 2019 Anticipated contract start date

  13. Contracting Process and Reporting Contracting Process • Mandatory contract meetings • 18 month Plan and Budgets • Standard City contract with some additional Federal language • Technical support funds may be utilized in the provision of required “content” trainings. Reporting • Service reports • Program Activities • Measurement and Evaluation Outcomes • Quarterly In person reports to Community Advisory Board