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How To Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core

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How To Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core

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  1. How To Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core Brian Pete February 10, 2014 Robin Fogarty & Associates robinfogarty.com
  2. How to Teach Thinking Skills Within the Common Core 7 Key Student Proficiencies of the New National Standards
  3. School Leaders Guide To the Common Core Achieving Results Through Rigor and Relevance
  4. AGENDA February 10, 2014 Expectations for transfer Thinking Skills Within the Common Core Close Reading – RSVEP Three Tiered Vocabulary 8:00 AM LUNCH 3:00 PM
  5. Meet and Greet Share 2 things you know about close reading. . .
  6. Meet and Greet Category cat·e·go·ry Any general or comprehensive division; a class.
  7. What does the Three Story Intellect remind you of?
  8. Agenda Every Day, Every Way Speaking Listening Reading Writing
  9. Setting Expectations for Transfer
  10. Pour & Store
  11. It’s All About Teaching
  12. How the Brain Works
  13. It’s All About Learning
  14. I taught Fluff how to count to three. I don’t hear him counting. Just because I taught it, doesn’t mean he caught it! Teaching /Learning Equation
  15. The Teaching/Learning Equation
  16. The Three Musketeers
  17. Setting Expectations for Transfer
  18. An education that honors children’s interests and helps them to think deeply about questions that matter is appropriate for affluent children.  For disadvantaged children, on the other hand, it is . . . essential. David Kribble
  19. S ERVE & V olley
  20. Partner #1 Agree / Disagree (share 1 reason) Partner #2 Compare their opinion to yours Partner #3 Summarize #1 & #2 then offer your opinion
  21. Mediated Journal Common Core Strategies Name Date
  22. Take Away Window
  23. Three Tiers Back Cover of Mediated Journal
  24. Take Away Window Meet & Greet (2 things about Close Reading) Categorize Three Story Intellect Cartoons / Images Three Musketeers Assign roles by Birthdays Tell and ReTell Read Quote Serve & Volley Agree/Disagree / Comparison / Summarize
  25. Big Picture
  26. Common Core State Standards 48 States 2 Territories & DC 13 Grades (K-12) 1,432 Standards 44,873 Words 7 Seven Skill Sets
  27. 7 KeyProficiencies
  28. 7 Proficiencies Critical Thinking Creative Thinking Complex Thinking Comprehensive Thinking Collaborative Thinking Communicative Thinking Cognitive Transfer
  29. Syllabus of Seven (with rate of frequency in CCSS) Critical Thinking – AnalysisEvaluateProblem Solving Analyze (73) Evaluate (22) Problem Solve (18) Determine Point of View (15) Compare/Contrast (12) Follow (11) Sequence (9) Solve (8) Draw (7) Sort (5) Creative Thinking – GenerateAssociateHypothesize Associate, Hypothesize, Generate, Demonstrate (35) Create (26) Produce (17) Develop (41) Form (12) Complex Thinking – ClarifyInterpretDetermine Challenge (2) Clarify (32) Find Central Idea (19) Determine (50) Research (33) Interpret (6) Find Theme (8) Comprehensive Thinking – UnderstandInferCompare/Contrast Verify (7) Determine Relevance (2) Infer Point of View (37) Understand (27) Read/Comprehend (20) Infer (10) Recount (9) Identify (8) Decode (6) Describe (2) Retell (5) Paraphrase (2) Collaborative Thinking – ExplainDevelopDecide Listen to Divergent Views, Apply Conflict Resolution Skills, Discuss w/Civil Discourse, Collaborate (8) Pose Questions (3) Communicative Thinking – ReasonConnectRepresent Use Logic, Find Relevant Evidence, Use Technology Media (8), Write (31) Organize (17) Explain (11) Develop Projects (8) See Relationships (30) Present (12) Cognitive Transfer – SynthesizeGeneralizeApply Generalize, Synthesize, Apply (14), Demonstrate (28) Reflect (3) Reflection (20) Summarize (7) Paraphrase (2)
  30. Syllabus of Seven Critical Thinking – AnalysisEvaluateProblem Solving Creative Thinking – GenerateAssociateHypothesize Complex Thinking – ClarifyInterpretDetermine Comprehensive Thinking – UnderstandInferCompare/ Collaborative Thinking – ExplainDevelopDecide Communicative Thinking – ReasonConnectRepresent Cognitive Transfer – SynthesizeGeneralizeApply
  31. Analyze
  32. Turn To Your Partner And . . . Analyze means . . .
  33. Chapter 1: Analyze No way of thinking or doing, however ancient, can be trusted without proof. Henry David Thoreau
  34. To analyze is to separate any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements. Related terms include: Diagnose Examine Classify Differentiate Distinguish
  35. To analyze is to separate any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements.
  36. PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.
  37. In the ELA Common Core State Standards the word Analyze
  38. In the ELA Common Core State Standards the word Analyze Appears 81 times . . .
  39. Analyzehow visual and multimedia elements contribute to the meaning, tone, or beauty of a text (e.g., graphic novel, multimedia presentation of fiction, folktale, myth, poem).
  40. Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributesto its meaning.
  41. Craft and Structure 6-8.6. Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text.
  42. Craft and Structure 9-10.6. Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, defining the question the author seeks to address.
  43. Craft and Structure 11-12.6. Analyze the author’s purpose in providing an explanation, describing a procedure, or discussing an experiment in a text, identifying important issues that remain unresolved.
  44. Analyzethe impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).
  45. Analyze
  46. In the MATH Common Core State Standards the word Analyze
  47. In the MATH Common Core State Standards the word Analyze Appears 28 times . . .
  48. Analyze, compare, create, and compose shapes. 4. Analyze and compare two- and three-dimensional shapes, in different sizes and orientations, using informal language to describe their similarities, differences, parts and other attributes
  49. Operations and Algebraic Thinking 4.OA Generate and analyzepatterns.
  50. Operations and Algebraic Thinking 5.OA Analyzepatterns and relationships.
  51. Expressions and Equations 6.EE Analyzethe relationship between the dependent and independent variables using graphs and tables, and relate these to the equation.
  52. Ratios and Proportional Relationships 7.0 Analyze proportional relationships and use them to solve real-world and mathematical problems.
  53. Use probability to evaluate outcomes of decisions 7. (+) Analyze decisions and strategies using probability concepts (e.g., product testing, medical testing, pulling a hockey goalie at the end of a game).
  54. In the ELA Common Core State Standards Performance Tasks the word Analyze Appears 28 times . . .
  55. In the ELA CCSS Performance Tasks the word Analyze
  56. In the ELA CCSS Performance Tasks the word Analyze 28 Times
  57. Students summarize the development of the morality of Tom Sawyer in Mark Twain’s novel of the same name and analyze its connection to themes of accountability and authenticity by noting how it is conveyed through characters, setting, and plot. [RL.8.2]
  58. Students analyzehow the playwright Louise Fletcher uses particular elements of drama (e.g., setting and dialogue) to create dramatic tension in her play Sorry, Wrong Number. [RL.7.3]
  59. The Goal
  60. “Analyze” ELA Analyze Theme SS Analyze Point of View CONSUMER ED Analyze Prices SCIENCE Analyze Velocity ART/MUSIC Analyze Style MATH Analyze Statistics HEALTH/PE Analyze Benefits Digital Literacy Analyze Website Interdisciplinary Model
  61. PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis.
  62. Common Core Balances Relevant Content with Rigorous Thinking
  63. Three-Phase Model
  64. Explicit Teaching
  65. Adult Learners Thinking Skills Analyze Teach Process as Content Part to Whole / Whole to Part Is the whole greater than the sum of the parts?
  66. What is an essential question? An essential question is – well, essential: important, vital, at the heart of the matter – the essence of the issue. One meaning of “essential” involves important questions that recur throughout one’s life. A second connotation for “essential” refers to key inquiries within a discipline.
  67. A question is essential when it:  causes genuine and relevant inquiry provokes deep thought, lively discussion, requires students to consider alternatives, weigh evidence, stimulates vital, on-going rethinking of big ideas, sparks meaningful connections with prior learning naturally recurs, creating opportunities for transfer to other situations and subjects.
  68. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process
  69. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention
  70. Look at your bill and decide what are the parts that you will need to address . . .
  71. Counterfeit. . .
  72. Things we might consider . . . Size Type of Paper Ink Designs Serial Numbers
  73. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Copy a Dollar Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process
  74. Skill Description: What Standard Requires
  75. A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5
  76. Description Analyzing is... TAG
  77. Think Pair Share Analyze means . . .
  78. Analyzing is. . . Examining Taking apart Appraising Noticing Details Dissecting Discerning
  79. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Skill Description: What Standard Requires Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process
  80. Menu of Operations “How-to” Steps for Students
  81. PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students
  82. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Skill Description: What Standard Requires Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content” Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process
  83. Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content”
  84. Video: Video Content 90 seconds long Cell Phone Ad From S. Korea What things (elements) might you see that you will have to account for when analyzing this video
  85. Disconnect to Connect Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ae0tzVo8Fw
  86. PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students
  87. Video
  88. PART Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. What is the same about each scene? Characters? Setting? Action? What is the different about each scene? Characters? Setting? Action? Generate a Five word Synthesis of this video.
  89. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Skill Description: What Standard Requires Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content” Disconnect to Connect Video - Mind Map / Synthesis Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Reflection: Student Comment on Process
  90. Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance
  91. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Skill Description: What Standard Requires Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content” Disconnect to Connect Video - Mind Map / Synthesis Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Share Synthesis with Partner Reflection: Student Comment on Process
  92. Reflection: Student Comment on Process
  93. Mrs. Potters Questions What were you supposed to do? What did you do well? What might you do differently next time? How can I be of help?
  94. Motivational Mind Set: Through Emotions get their Attention Copy a Dollar Analyze Analysis w/Optical Illusions Skill Description: What Standard Requires Preview the whole situation. Assess the individual parts. Reorganize by similarities and differences. Turn the analysis into a summary or synthesis. Menu of Operations: “How-to” Steps for Students Instructional Strategy:“Process as Content” Disconnect to Connect Video - Fishbone Assessment: Judgment of Product or Performance Share Synthesis with Partner Reflection: Student Comment on Process Mrs. Potters Questions
  95. Analyze the nutritional value of your lunch Career / College Ready Skills Summarize
  96. Shift from “What’s Taught” to “What Students Need to Be Able to Do” To succeed in 21st Century college and careers, students need to be able to: 1. Solve problems 2. Manage oneself 3. Adapt to change 4. Analyze/conceptualize 5. Reflect on /improve performance 6. Communicate 7. Work in teams 8. Create / innovate / critique 9. Engage in learning throughout life
  97. Work in teams Solve problems Communicate Manage oneself Create Innovate Critique Analyze Conceptualize Reflect on /improve performance Engage in learning throughout life Adapt to change
  98. Describe: Provide a Specific Workplace Example 1☐ Solve problems 2☐ Manage oneself 3☐ Adapt to change 4☐ Analyze/conceptualize 5☐ Reflect on /improve performance 6☐ Communicate 7☐ Work in teams 8☐ Create / innovate / critique 9☐ Engage in learning throughout life
  99. V S ERVE & olley
  100. Partner # A Identify the 21st Century skill that will be biggest challenge. (give 1 reason why) Partner #B Identify a key point your Partner shared & develop it further. (Elaborate, go deeper . . .) Partner #A Include both comments into following sentence . . . “To address this 21st Century skill we will have to do the following . . . Partner #B Summarize the discussion in a simple action step.
  101. LUNCH
  102. High Five Walk
  103. AB Pyramid Game
  104. ABPyramid Game
  105. Analyze Parts Disagree Movement
  106. Brain Thinking Standards Achievement
  107. Rigor Reflection Expectations Struggle
  108. Careers Disconnect Common Soar
  109. Laughing and Learning Retention up 50% Even an attempt at humor is effective Grace Dearborn - Conscious Teaching
  110. Write Read Reflect ReWrite
  111. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer’s purpose. b. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details. c. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically). d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
  112. Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. Topic: Gender specific academic classroom Your Point of View: January February March April The Student: May June July August The Teacher: September October November December The Parent:
  113. TTYPA (Turn To Your Partner And . . .)
  114. Many students attend schools that do not have a computer for every student but most every student has a cell phone. Cell phones are the handheld computers that educators dreamed about for years. According to the commission on 21st Century Skills, just about every job uses technology in some way. In fact, more and more this technology is the handheld variety. As a parent of a 4th grade son I want part of his curriculum to be not only dependent on a handheld or cell phone but I would expect dome of the curriculum to cover how to use technology responsibly
  115. Vocabulary Look over you writing & choose 3 words List 3 possible synonyms for these words OK to use technology for one of the words
  116. Many students attend schools that do not have a computer for every student but most every student has a cell phone. Cell phones are the handheld computers that educators dreamed about for years. According to the commission on 21st Century Skills, just about every job uses technology in some way. In fact, more and more this technology is the handheld variety. As a parent of a 4th grade son I want part of his curriculum to be not only dependent on a handheld or cell phone but I would expect dome of the curriculum to cover how to use technology responsibly
  117. Many students attend schools that do not have a computer for every student but most every student has a cell phone. Cell phones are the handheld computers that educators dreamed about for years. According to the commission on 21st Century Skills, just about every job uses technology in some way. In fact, more and more this technology is the handheld variety. As a parent of a 4th grade son I want part of his curriculum to be not onlydependenton a handheld or cell phone but I would expect dome of the curriculum to cover how to use technology responsibly Dreamed - Imagined Hoped for Fantasized about Jobs - Careers Vocations gigs dependent - primary unconditional fundamental
  118. Syntax/Structure Underline 2 sentences Your best one & one you would edit.
  119. Many students attend schools that do not have a computer for every student but most every student has a cell phone. Cell phones are the handheld computers that educators dreamed about for years. According to the commission on 21st Century Skills, just about every job uses technology in some way. In fact, more and more this technology is the handheld variety. As a parent of a 4th grade son I want part of his curriculum to be not only dependent on a handheld or cell phone but I would expect dome of the curriculum to cover how to use technology responsibly
  120. RIGOR It’s not a four letter word . . .
  121. One Minute Write
  122. Write for one minute . . . As much as you can . . . Use complete sentences . . . Close Reading
  123. Count the number of words . . . Count the number of ABC Graffiti Words Set a goal . . . Share your goal Prepare for the next One Minute Write Writing
  124. One Minute Write
  125. Write for one minute . . . As much as you can . . . Use complete sentences . . . Close Reading
  126. Count the number of words . . . Count the number of ABC Graffiti Words Set a goal . . . Share your goal Prepare for the next One Minute Write Writing
  127. CLOSEREADING
  128. CLOSEREADING
  129. Step Book Close Reading With RSVP-E (Text Dependent Questions) R Reading Task S Structure Task V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task
  130. Read 2-3-4 times Step Book Read for detail, deep understanding Options Independent Teacher-Led Buddy Choral Reader’s Theater Echo Blue Tooth R Reading Task S Structure Task V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task
  131. Sentence Syntax Compound / Complex Step Book Paragraph Structure 1st Sentence / Last Sentence Text Structure Organization “What does the text say?” “Show evidence of . . .” “How do you support that?” S Structure Task V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task
  132. Vocabulary / Word Choice Step Book “Everyday”-Spoken Words “Academic”-Written Words “Discipline Specific” Word Games AB Pyramid ABC Graffiti Word Walls Word Cards Card Games V Vocabulary Task P Purpose Task E Expressive Task
  133. Author’s Purpose Step Book Purpose: “What does text say?” Tone & Tenor: “How do you know?” Evidence? Author’s Style: Explain with examples Point of View: Bias? Perspective? Source: Where? Valid? Reliable? Central Theme: How do you know from text? P Purpose Task E Expressive Task
  134. Express in Writing Step Book Expository: Explanation Persuasion Instruction Argument Narrative: Story / Poem / Play / Song Evidence of “voice”. Options One Minute Write MJ Entry Pass Along Story or Para Read – Write - Reflect E Expressive Task
  135. Back of Step Book Supports for ELs Focus on Academic Language Bilingual Word Walls Higher Order Thinking Metacognition Expression & Presentation Listening, Speaking, Reading, Writing (Practice of all 4 language domains.) Extended Engagement w/Complex Ideas Focusing on Text and Discourse Differentiate Based on EL Proficiencies Different Strokes for Different Folks
  136. Close Reading Tasks Test Dependent Questions Reading Task Syntax Task Vocabulary Task Purpose Task ExpressionTask
  137. Analyze PART Preview All Assess the Parts Reorganize; Group Turn into Summary
  138. Roll the Dice
  139. ReadingTask
  140. How Close Reading Increases student’s Access into Complex Text as Expected in the ELA Common Core Standards Piercy 9.08.11 ThommiePiercey, Ph.D
  141. Excerpt What is Close Reading? ThommiePiercey
  142. What is Close Reading? Close Reading is keeping your eyes on the text to read the content very carefully, paying attention to details. Being quite different from a summary or the big idea, close reading requires active thinking and analyzing of the content to make decisions. You can see how text-dependent, discipline-specific questions support the need for students’ to incorporate close reading of their text because they must cite evidence directly from the text. This is a skill that will remain one of the students’ most practical literacy skills throughout their college and careers. Few disciplines do not benefit from students’ close reading to achieve understanding. The majority of career paths depend on close reading to remain current in the particular field. For this reason, close reading is a skill that supports students’ comprehension in different disciplines. Elementary, Middle, and High School students benefit from the close reading of complex texts in different content areas.
  143. Reading Task 1 - Independent 2 - Teacher-Led 3 – Buddy Reading 4 - Choral Reading 5 – Echo Reading 6 - Blue Tooth Reading
  144. StructureTask
  145. What is Close Reading? Close Reading is keeping your eyes on the text to read the content very carefully, paying attention to details. Being quite different from a summary or the big idea, close reading requires active thinking and analyzing of the content to make decisions. You can see how text-dependent, discipline-specific questions support the need for students’ to incorporate close reading of their text because they must cite evidence directly from the text. This is a skill that will remain one of the students’ most practical literacy skills throughout their college and careers. Few disciplines do not benefit from students’ close reading to achieve understanding. The majority of career paths depend on close reading to remain current in the particular field. For this reason, close reading is a skill that supports students’ comprehension in different disciplines. Elementary, Middle, and High School students benefit from the close reading of complex texts in different content areas. What does the author mean in the text when he says, “keeping your eyes on the text?”
  146. VocabularyTask
  147. What is Close Reading? Close Reading is keeping your eyes on the text to read the content very carefully, paying attention to details. Being quite different from a summary or the big idea, close reading requires active thinking and analyzing of the content to make decisions. You can see how text-dependent, discipline-specific questions support the need for students’ to incorporate close reading of their text because they must cite evidence directly from the text. This is a skill that will remain one of the students’ most practical literacy skills throughout their college and careers. Few disciplines do not benefit from students’ close reading to achieve understanding. The majority of career paths depend on close reading to remain current in the particular field. For this reason, close reading is a skill that supports students’ comprehension in different disciplines. Elementary, Middle, and High School students benefit from the close reading of complex texts in different content areas. Vocabulary Text-dependent Word Choice When arguing for the value of close reading why does the the author use the phrase “career paths” vs. jobs?
  148. PurposeTask
  149. What is Close Reading? Close Reading is keeping your eyes on the text to read the content very carefully, paying attention to details. Being quite different from a summary or the big idea, close reading requires active thinking and analyzing of the content to make decisions. You can see how text-dependent, discipline-specific questions support the need for students’ to incorporate close reading of their text because they must cite evidence directly from the text. This is a skill that will remain one of the students’ most practical literacy skills throughout their college and careers. Few disciplines do not benefit from students’ close reading to achieve understanding. The majority of career paths depend on close reading to remain current in the particular field. For this reason, close reading is a skill that supports students’ comprehension in different disciplines. Elementary, Middle, and High School students benefit from the close reading of complex texts in different content areas. What is the authors purpose or point of view? Justify with evidence from the text.
  150. ExpressiveTask
  151. What is Close Reading? Close Reading is keeping your eyes on the text to read the content very carefully, paying attention to details. Being quite different from a summary or the big idea, close reading requires active thinking and analyzing of the content to make decisions. You can see how text-dependent, discipline-specific questions support the need for students’ to incorporate close reading of their text because they must cite evidence directly from the text. This is a skill that will remain one of the students’ most practical literacy skills throughout their college and careers. Few disciplines do not benefit from students’ close reading to achieve understanding. The majority of career paths depend on close reading to remain current in the particular field. For this reason, close reading is a skill that supports students’ comprehension in different disciplines. Elementary, Middle, and High School students benefit from the close reading of complex texts in different content areas. Explain how the author contrasts close reading to a summary or big idea? Paraphrase your understanding of close reading.
  152. Three Tiered Vocabulary
  153. The Three Musketeers
  154. Tier One words are the words of everyday speech usually learned in the early grades, albeit not at the same rate by all children. They are not considered a challenge to the average native speaker, though English language learners of any age will have to attend carefully to them. While Tier One words are important, they are not the focus of this discussion.
  155. Tier Two words (what the Standards refer to as general academic words) are far more likely to appear in written texts than in speech. They appear in all sorts of texts: informational texts (words such as relative, vary, formulate, specificity, and accumulate), technical texts (calibrate, itemize, periphery), and literary texts (misfortune, dignified, faltered, unabashedly). Tier Two words often represent subtle or precise ways to say relatively simple things—saunter instead of walk, for Example, because Tier Two words are found across many types of texts, they are highly generalizable.
  156. Tier Three words (what the Standards refer to as domain-specific words) are specific to a domain or field of study (lava, carburetor, legislature, circumference, aorta) and key to understanding a new concept within a text. Because of their specificity and close ties to content knowledge, Tier Three words are far more common in informational texts than in literature. Recognized as new and “hard” words for most readers (particularly student readers), they are often explicitly defined by the author of a text, repeatedly used, and otherwise heavily scaffolded (e.g., made a part of a glossary).
  157. Tier One words are the words of everyday speech usually learned in the early grades, albeit not at the same rate by all children. They are not considered a challenge to the average native speaker, though English language learners of any age will have to attend carefully to them. While Tier One words are important, they are not the focus of this discussion. Tier Two words (what the Standards refer to as general academic words) are far more likely to appear in written texts than in speech. They appear in all sorts of texts: informational texts (words such as relative, vary, formulate, specificity, and accumulate), technical texts (calibrate, itemize, periphery), and literary texts (misfortune, dignified, faltered, unabashedly). Tier Two words often represent subtle or precise ways to say relatively simple things—saunter instead of walk, for Example, because Tier Two words are found across many types of texts, they are highly generalizable. Tier Three words (what the Standards refer to as domain-specific words) are specific to a domain or field of study (lava, carburetor, legislature, circumference, aorta) and key to understanding a new concept within a text. Because of their specificity and close ties to content knowledge, Tier Three words are far more common in informational texts than in literature. Recognized as new and “hard” words for most readers (particularly student readers), they are often explicitly defined by the author of a text, repeatedly used, and otherwise heavily scaffolded (e.g., made a part of a glossary).
  158. Three Tier Vocabulary- Reader’s Theater/Questions 1. Complete the statement: While everyday words are not considered a challenge to native speakers... 2. Compare and contrast academic and domain-specific words. Use examples. 3. Generate 25 precise, Tier 2 words for “Said”. 4. Describe a word game you use to teacher academic vocabulary 5. Rank the Tiers according to frequency of us in your classroom. ______Tier 1 ______Tier 2 ______Tier 3 6. Explain with a specific content example: Words lead to Fluency Fluency Leads to Comprehension Comprehension leads to Deep Understanding Deep Understanding leads to Transfer 7. Why describe rather than define when teaching new, unfamiliar vocabulary? 8. Agree/Disagree: Words have power. Justify.
  159. Three Tier Vocabulary- Reader’s Theater/Questions 1. Complete the statement: While everyday words are not considered a challenge to native speakers... 2. Compare and contrast academic and domain-specific words. Use examples. 3. Generate 25 precise, Tier 2 words for “Said”. 4. Describe a word game you use to teacher academic vocabulary 5. Rank the Tiers according to frequency of us in your classroom. ______Tier 1 ______Tier 2 ______Tier 3 6. Explain with a specific content example: Words lead to Fluency Fluency Leads to Comprehension Comprehension leads to Deep Understanding Deep Understanding leads to Transfer 7. Why describe rather than define when teaching new, unfamiliar vocabulary? 8. Agree/Disagree: Words have power. Justify.
  160. The success of professional development or professional learning can only be determined by measuring the implementation of strategies, the incorporation of concepts and changes in attitudes that teachers are able to transfer from the staff room to the classroom. Too many times, professional learning is judged based on evaluations filled out by teachers as they are packing up their bags and collecting their car keys. As principals and teachers shift their thinking about the goals of professional learning, they understand that success is measured by the number and level of applications in the classroom following the professional learning sessions.
  161. Close Reading
  162. B A Partners
  163. V S ERVE & olley
  164. What was once educationally significant, but difficult to measure, has been replaced by what is insignificant and easy to measure.  So, now we test how well we have taught what we do not value. Art Costa
  165. Partner # A Agree / Disagree (share 1 reason) Partner #B Compare their opinion to yours. Partner #A Summarize both comments into one sentence. Partner #B Synthesize the single sentence into three words or less.
  166. Writing Prompts
  167. Mediated Journal Entry… Name a good writer. (Historical figure, fictional character, or personal acquaintance). 2. List two traits of this good writer (beyond the obvious). 3. Describe someone who is not a good writer. 4. Tell how the two are different. 5.Write a closing sentence. 6.Give your piece a telling title.
  168. Think Pair Share Define Differentiation
  169. ABC Graffiti
  170. ABCDEFGH I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  171. LITERACY ABCDEFGH I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Reading Fluency Writing
  172. Differentiation ABCDEFGH I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
  173. ABC Graffiti Compound Word
  174. Compound Word Targeted + Strategic = Targec, adj - to act with a plan of action toward specific goal
  175. Compound Word Movie + Sleep = Sloovie, n - the state of deep sleep only attained while watching a movie rental.
  176. Compound Word Diet + Remorse = Dimorse, adj - the feeling of regret felt when facing a all you-can-eat Buffet right after starting a diet.
  177. Diet + Remorse = Dimorse, adj - the feeling of regret felt when facing a all-you-can-eat buffet right after starting a diet. Targeted + Strategic = Targec, adj - to act with a plan of action toward a specific goal. Movie + Sleep = Sloovie, n - the state of deep sleep only attained while watching a movie rental.