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Bibliographic citations

Bibliographic citations

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Bibliographic citations

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  1. Bibliographic citations • Definition: • For academic purposes, a citation or bibliographic citation is a: reference to a • book, • article, • web page or other published or • unpublished item, And includes sufficient details to uniquely identify the item

  2. Bibliographic citations – Why? • To give credit to an individual’s idea(s), words or publication(s). • To help readers locate the thought/publication that is being referred to if the readers wish to read it for themselves. • To verify that the thought/publication has, indeed, appeared somewhere.

  3. And more recently …. • Plagiarism: • Copying sentences, phrases, paragraphs, tables, figures or data directly or in slightly modified form from a book, article, web site or other academic source without using quotation marks or giving proper acknowledgment to the original author or source. http://www.ccsu.edu/AcademicIntegrity/UndergradAcadMisconductPolicy.htm

  4. Parts of a Bibliographic Citation For a Serialized Item Author(s) (If no author is listed, use the next element to begin your citation) Title of Article Title of Publication Volume/Issue/Pages Date of Publication If the item was viewed electronically, other information must be given For a Single Item • Author • Title of the item • Who Published the item • The location of the Publisher • Date of Publication

  5. Challenges of electronic publications • Individuals often no longer need to consult a printed document. • So what is a volume number? • An issue number? • Why are pages important?

  6. Finding citation elements in DATABASE records

  7. Finding citation elements in DATABASE records

  8. Printed indexes, hard copies of articles and books and items retrieved from electronic databases may present the elements of bibliographic citations in different ways. But the required elements are always present.

  9. Authors

  10. . Title of Article Authors

  11. Name of Publication Title of Article Authors

  12. Date of pub. Name of Publication Title of Article Authors

  13. Vol/issue/pages Date of pub. Name of Publication Title of Article Authors

  14. This mess …..

  15. Becomes this, which is still not so straightforward

  16. author

  17. author Title of article

  18. Title of publication (often called SOURCE) author Title of article

  19. volume Title of publication (often called SOURCE) author Title of article

  20. issue volume Title of publication (often called SOURCE) author Title of article

  21. date issue volume Title of publication (often called SOURCE) author Title of article

  22. pages date issue volume Title of publication also called SOURCE) author Title of article

  23. Here’s an example of the elements of this item written as a bibliographic citation for this for this article (written in APA style): Fischlin, D. (2003). Rescripting Shakespeare: The text, the director, and modern productions. Theatre Research International, 28(2), 212-213.

  24. Citation elements for a book – this is very straightforward

  25. Citation elements for a book – relatively straightforward What is required? Author, title, place of publication, name of the publisher, and the date of publication.

  26. Citation elements for a book – this is very straightforward DeLillo, D. (1986). White noise. New York: Penguin Books.

  27. Book found on WorldCat (electronic database)

  28. Book found on WorldCat (electronic database) Naipaul, V.S. (1995). A house for Mr. Biswas. New York: Knopf.

  29. Hard copy of an edited book

  30. Hard copy of an edited book

  31. Hard copy of an edited book

  32. Hard copy of an edited book

  33. Hard copy of an edited book Is this a complete citation? If not, what’s missing? Smith, D.L. (Ed.). Era of the American Revolution a bibliography. Santa Barbara: ABC-Clio.

  34. Hard copy of an edited book

  35. Hard copy of an edited book Smith, D.L. (Ed.). (1975). Era of the American Revolution a bibliography. Santa Barbara: ABC-Clio.

  36. “In” is the important word Chapters in a book – a slight twist Greenberg, D. F. et al (2002). The generality of the self-control theory of crime. In E. Waring & D. Weisburd (Eds.), Crime and social organization (pp. 49-94). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction. Notice: No volume number, no issue number. Why?

  37. Database retrieval includes the elements that are required to properly cite the item – but you must know what you’re looking for.

  38. Bower, T. (2005 Feb. 10). Pitbull victim tells of attack; DA suing for penalties, but the dog owner’s lawyer says she has paid her debt. San Antonio Express-News, 5B. publication date page title author

  39. Citation Styles

  40. Citation Styles

  41. Article in a journal (APA Style) Author. (Year). Title of article. Title of Journal, Vol#(issue#), pages. For example: Fischlin, D. (2003). Rescripting Shakespeare: The text, the director, and modern productions. Theatre Research International, 28(2), 212-213. An entire book (APA Style) Author. (Year). Title of book. Place of publication: Name of Publisher. For example: Hock, R. (2005). Yahoo! To the max. Medford, NJ: Cyberage Books. Chapter in a book (APA Style) Author. (Year). Title. In editors of book (Eds.), Title of book (pages of the chapter). Place of publication: Name of Publisher. For example: Greenberg, D. F. et al (2002). The generality of the self-control theory of crime. In E. Waring & D. Weisburd (Eds.), Crime and social organization (pp. 49-94). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.

  42. Citation Aids –Trust No One (but yourself)

  43. Article in a journal (APA Style) Author. (Year). Title of article. Title of Journal, Vol#(issue#), pages. For example: Fischlin, D. (2003). Rescripting Shakespeare: The text, the director, and modern productions. Theatre Research International, 28(2), 212-213. An entire book (APA Style) Author. (Year). Title of book. Place of publication: Name of Publisher. For example: Hock, R. (2005). Yahoo! To the max. Medford, NJ: Cyberage Books. Chapter in a book (APA Style) Author. (Year). Title. In editors of book (Eds.), Title of book (pages of the chapter). Place of publication: Name of Publisher. For example: Greenberg, D. F. et al (2002). The generality of the self-control theory of crime. In E. Waring & D. Weisburd (Eds.), Crime and social organization (pp. 49-94). New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction.