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Mobility and Deployment

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Mobility and Deployment

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  1. Mobility and Deployment The Psychological Dimensions Anne Wilson, Senior Educational Psychologist, Service Children’s Education, Episkopi

  2. Mobility and Deployment • Patterns of mobility and deployment • The transition process • Risk and Resilience factors • Preparing pupils for moving

  3. Number of Service Children • Approx 10,000 overseas in SCE schools in Germany, Belgium, The Netherlands, Gibraltar, Cyprus, Belize, Brunei, Italy, Denmark • Another 1,000 overseas but not in SCE schools • Approx 80,000 in UK

  4. Dobson and Henthorne (1) • Mobility Rate ( JPL) • Pupils joining + pupils leaving x 100 Total school roll

  5. Dobson and Henthorne Report (2) • Mobility rate of more than 20% + is considered to be high • Schools with forces children had some of the highest mobility rates • They also had the least stable core of pupils

  6. Experience of Moving • Many units will move together at frequent intervals • Other families will move on individual ‘trickle postings’ • Whilst a family is overseas there will probably be periods of deployment

  7. 2nd Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers • 1997 Chepstow N Ireland 6 months • 1998 RAF Brawdy • 2001 Ballykelly Sierre Leone • 2002 Turnhill N Ireland Easter • 2004 Aldershot Iraq 6 months, N Ireland, firemens strike • 2006 Episkopi Iraq, Afghanistan • 2008 Chester

  8. 2nd Battalion Royal Regiment of Fusiliers 1996 Celle, Germany Kosovo 2001 St George’s, UK N Ireland x 2 2003 Belfast, N Ireland Iraq 2006 Dhekelia, Iraq/ Afghanistan Cyprus Jordan x 2 2008 Hounslow

  9. TRANSITION CHAOS ENTERING LEAVING Anxiety Status Less Re-engaging Observation Introduction Vulnerability Disengaging Preparation Celebration Denial RE-INVOLVEMENT INVOLVEMENT Settled Commitment Status Intimacy The Transition Experience Settled Commitment Status Intimacy

  10. Transition - Disengagement • Pupils may begin to disengage up to 6 months before the move • Energy and emotion devoted to planning ahead • Pupils may be excluded by peers or may exclude themselves

  11. Transition - Moving • A busy and chaotic period • The pupils’ needs may be overlooked • Excitement and anticipation • Sadness, grieving • Loss of confidence and self esteem

  12. Transition - Re-engagement • May take up to 6 months to feel fully involved in the new location • Some pupils will feel a huge sense of loss • Some pupils may experience culture shock • Parents will need time to adjust and settle as well as pupils

  13. Service Children • May have a strong sense of belonging to the service community • May deal with transitions best when they move to schools with a high number of service pupils • Their overall development will be affected by mobility

  14. Benefits of Mobility • Adaptable and flexible pupils • Confident in change • Wide network of friends • Worldwide perspective • Value relationships • Sense the importance of ‘now’

  15. Benefits of mobility • Establish deeper relationships • Develop closure skills • Mature compared to peers

  16. Elements of Resilience Sense of self esteem and confidence. Belief in self efficacy and the ability to deal with change and adaptation. A repertoire of social problem solving skills. Rutter 1985

  17. Challenges of Mobility • Social Chameleon • Migratory instinct • Too many relationships • Accumulate loss and grief • Emotionally ‘flat’ • Reluctant to engage

  18. Mobility - Challenges • Difficulty in planning • Latent adolescent • Quick release response • Guarded/ Insulated

  19. Risk factors Frequent experience of loss and separation. Frequent life changing events Increased awareness of traumatic events. DfES 2001

  20. Helping pupils to deal with moving - Leavers • Establish an E-mail link with a pupil in the new school • Keep accurate records of progress and current targets • Help resolve any conflicts with other pupils • Plan farewell rituals • Affirm relationships and achievements • Think positively about the future

  21. Helping pupils deal with moving - Joiners • Have an induction pack which pupils have helped to prepare • Have information for parents about your class • Nominate other pupils to be mentors for new arrivals • Encourage pupils to talk about where they have been

  22. Preparing for Moving • Create opportunities for pupils to talk about their experiences of moving • Be cognisant of the transition cycle, the time scales and emotional upheaval that can be involved • Look out for signs of separation anxiety • Read relevant literature….The Third Culture Kid Experience is highly recommended

  23. Supporting pupils during deployment • Parents may be away on exercise, deployment or courses. • Keep up to date records of whose parents are deployed. • Be aware of changes in mood or behaviour. • Provide opportunities for pupils to talk about their feelings.

  24. Supporting pupils during deployment • Maintain good links with the Chain of Command. • Encourage children to maintain contact with an absent parent. • Keep good links with parents. • Be aware of the impact of your own feelings. Seek support if necessary.

  25. Children’s questions about Cyprus • School organistion • School rules • Local culture • Local environment • Activities