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The fur Trade Era, 1770s-1849


The fur Trade Era, 1770s-1849
. "[They] didn't know what it was when [Captain Cook's] ship came into the harbour ...they thought it was a fish come alive into people.” Mrs. Winnifred David ( p . 65).

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The fur Trade Era, 1770s-1849


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  1. The fur Trade Era, 1770s-1849
 "[They] didn't know what it was when [Captain Cook's] ship came into the harbour...they thought it was a fish come alive into people.”Mrs. Winnifred David (p. 65)

  2. The First Nations of British Columbia made contact with Europeans later than most other indigenous people in North America. • First contact was made by sea in the 1770's; fur traders traveling overland arrived soon thereafter.

  3. During the maritime fur trade period, First Nations people adapted new materials and customs into their traditional social patterns.

  4. The land-based fur trade, however, slowly began to change the balance of power. • The fur trade era had positive and negative effects.

  5. Before colonization, First Nations societies were independent, autonomous, self-governing nations. • The European newcomers relied on the assistance and technology of the First Nations people to survive and travel. • Fur-trading created new economies and changes in traditional hunting priorities.

  6. Epidemics • While European goods often enhanced First Nations peoples' way of life, the devastating effects of contagious diseases overwhelmed any positive effects. • Close to 90 per cent of the First Nations population died from smallpox and other diseases.

  7. First Nations Population Information • In the table below, you will find some estimates of the First Nations populations over time. Create a graph of these figures to give you a strong visual representation of the effects of epidemics and other diseases on the population.

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