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table 7 1 the corporate class kerbo s outline p 184 n.
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Table 7-1. The Corporate Class: Kerbo’s Outline (p. 184) PowerPoint Presentation
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Table 7-1. The Corporate Class: Kerbo’s Outline (p. 184)

Table 7-1. The Corporate Class: Kerbo’s Outline (p. 184)

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Table 7-1. The Corporate Class: Kerbo’s Outline (p. 184)

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  1. Table 7-1. The Corporate Class: Kerbo’s Outline (p. 184) • Critique of the Ruling Class theory • Defining the Corporate Class: Structure of Corporate Concentration • The Nature and Consequences of Economic and Political Centralization • Is There a Corporate Class? Does it Really Matter?

  2. Table 7-2. Comparing Upper and Corporate Classes Based on Interests, Organization, and Power

  3. Table 7-3. The Foundation for a Corporate Class (Kerbo, p. 188) • The increasing size of major corporations and their increasing domination of the global markets since 1880 • The increasing concentration of stock ownership in major corporations, including ownership by other (particularly financial) corporations • The growing network of interlocking directorates that link top corporate personnel and foster interests and loyalties that transcend specific corporations, which facilitates collective action and political planning and influence

  4. Table 7-4. Top Ten U.S. Corporations Based on Forbes Rating, with Assets and Sales in Billions of U.S. Dollars, 2004 (from Kerbo, pp. 188-189)

  5. Table 7-5. Top Ten U.S. Corporations Based on Assets with Assets and Sales in Billions of U.S. Dollars, 2004 (from Kerbo, pp. 188-189)

  6. Table 7-6. Stock-Voting Positions Held by Other Banks in Top Five Banks Ranked by Assets (Kerbo, p. 196)

  7. Table 7-7. Why Do Corporate Interlocks Matter (from Kerbo, p. 197) • They reduce competition among corporations • They represent outside influence over corporations • They provide ways of exchanging information between corporations that might otherwise be barred by restraint of trade regulations • They help provide unity and facilitate organization of the corporate class • They help corporations cooperate in dealing with government regulations or in attempting to influence government policy

  8. Table 7-8. Characteristics of the Corporate Inter-Organizational Leaders (Kerbo, p. 203) • Have more positions on corporate boards • More likely to be on board of larger corporations • Often represent large banks on corporate boards • More often belong to elite social clubs • More often worked their way up to top positions rather than inheriting wealthy family status • Often represent corporate interests in foundations, universities, and government

  9. Table 7-9. Three Perspectives on Three Questions About Elites (from Kerbo, p. 210)