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SMART: Developing Effective Goals and Objectives

SMART: Developing Effective Goals and Objectives

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SMART: Developing Effective Goals and Objectives

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  1. SMART: Developing Effective Goals and Objectives Presented by Barry Nagle Evaluation and Action Research Associates (EARA) Fairfax, VA March 2009

  2. Agenda Part A • Goal/Objective Definition • How to be SMART • Review of the component terms • SMART tool • Table to facilitate SMART Objective Development • SMART Benefits/Costs Part B • SMART and the PART • How SMART can facilitate NASA’s efforts to effectively respond to OMB’s Performance Assessment Rating Tool

  3. Goal/Objective Definition

  4. Goals/Objectives • The most important element of a successful program is the development of attainable goals and measurable objectives • Guides program planning and design • Communicates to stakeholders • Enables evaluation • Success is dependent upon realistic goals

  5. Goals: Characteristics • Describe the overall purpose of the program • Describe broad outcomes and concepts (what we want to accomplish) • Expressed in general terms.

  6. Goals: Development Steps • Research the topic (define needs) • Involve stakeholders (gains commitment) • Brainstorm goals • Select the goals that have priority (decide on what matters) • Limit the program to two-five goals (select realistic goals)

  7. Goals: Samples • The program will inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics • The program will positively impact the gender diversity of the STEM workforce • The program will increase the capacity of minority institutions in STEM research

  8. Objectives • Specifically state how the goals will be achieved • Are measurable: Define what you want to see • Encourage a consistent focus on program functions

  9. Objectives Are Not… Tasks • Conducting a training session is a task. • Poor objective: We will conduct a training session • An effective objective is something the program can fail at. • An effective objective defines intent • Better objective: Faculty that attend the training session will be able to identify at least three NASA grant programs that align with their research interests.

  10. How to be SMART

  11. SMART Objectives • Specific: Be precise about what you are going to achieve • Measurable:Quantify the objectives • Appropriate: Align with the needs of the target audience • Realistic: Do you have the resources to make the objective happen? • Time-Specific: State when you will achieve the objective

  12. SMART: Specific Objectives Specific: Be precise about what you are going to achieve • Specify target • Specify intended outcome • One outcome per objective • Avoid vague verbs (e.g. know, understand) • Make sure the objective is linked to the goal • Sample: By January 2010, at least 3% of the engineering majors at the institution will be female

  13. SMART: Measurable Objectives Measurable:Quantify the objectives • Use measures as indicators of program success • If possible, establish a baseline (e.g. In January 2009, 2% of the engineering majors at the institution were female) • Sample: By January 2010, at least 3% of the engineering majors at the institution will be female

  14. SMART: Appropriate Objectives Appropriate: Align with the needs of the target audience • Meeting the objective will advance the goal • Identify a specific target audience • Are inclusive of diversity within your group • Sample: By January 2010, at least 3% of the engineering majors at the institution will be female • Note: The “A” is sometimes called “Attainable” or “Achievable” in the literature.

  15. SMART: Realistic Objectives Realistic : Do you have the resources to make the objective happen? • Are important to stakeholders • Are adequately resourced • Can be achieved • Sample: By January 2010, at least 3% of the engineering majors at the institution will be female Take care on what you say you can do! The January 2009 baseline was 2%. Is a 1% increase in one year realistic?

  16. SMART: Time-Specific Objectives Time-Specific: State when you will achieve the objective • Provide timeframe indicating when objective will be met • Sample: By January 2010, at least 3% of the engineering majors at the institution will be female

  17. Goals and Objectives Objective One Objective Two Goal Objective Three Maintain a clear connection between your goals and objectives. By maintaining this connection, you are articulating your theory of goal attainment.

  18. SMART Tool

  19. SMART Tool Goal: The engineering department will positively impact the gender diversity of the engineering workforce

  20. SMART Benefits and Costs

  21. Benefits • Facilitates communication with program stakeholders • Informs on what data should be collected • Enables effective program management • Enables government funders to better fulfill PART requirements • Facilitates the linkage of activities and intended effects/goals • Enables a focus on evaluation • Process level (activities) • Output level • Outcome level • Facilitates replication

  22. Costs and Limitations • Impression that creativity is limited • Time-consuming • GI/GO • Encourages too great a focus on discrete measures

  23. Comment on Metrics • A well-written objective suggests the metric(s) • Example: • On an annual basis, at least 5% of the students that apply to the program will be female • Metrics: • Total applications to the department • Percentage of applications from females • While this may appear obvious, this is an area where programs often fail.

  24. SMART and the PART

  25. Definition and Information • PART: Performance Assessment Rating Tool • Operationalizes the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) of 1993 • GPRA was passed under the Clinton administration • The PART was developed under the Bush administration

  26. Definition and Information • Considers four areas • Program purpose and design • Strategic planning • Program management • Program results and accountability • Evidence-based assessment that can be accessed by the public • Consistent approach for evaluating programs

  27. Definition and Information • Program Ratings • Effective • Moderately Effective • Adequate • Ineffective • Results Not Demonstrated

  28. Effective Program Rating Sample The full reports contain more detail. These are available on the OMB Internet site.

  29. Ineffective Program Rating Sample The full reports contain more detail. These are available on the OMB Internet site.

  30. Key OMB Terms • Outputs: The internal activities of the program (the products and services delivered) • These are the “whats” of the program • These are the SMART objectives • Outcomes: The events or conditions external to the program and of direct importance to the public/beneficiary • These are the “so whats” of the program • These are the goals

  31. Key OMB Terms • Efficiency Measures: Demonstrate the ability of the program to implement activities and achieve results and to make the best use of resources. Usually expressed as a ratio of inputs to outputs/outcomes. • This is an economic concept • Does not mean you are doing something as cheaply as possible; rather, the term indicates an effective use of resources.

  32. SMART-PART Association • Program purpose and design: Assesses whether the program’s purpose and design are clear and sound • In total, SMART objectives that are aligned with the program goals indicate a clarity of purpose and soundness of design

  33. SMART-PART Association • Strategic planning: Assesses whether a program has valid long-term and annual measures and targets • SMART objectives define the metrics that will be collected and the intended timeframes.

  34. SMART-PART Association • Program management: Assesses program management, including financial management and accountability • A program that maintains alignment between its budget, activities, and objectives can demonstrate its effective program management

  35. SMART-PART Association • Program results and accountability: Assesses program effectiveness and reported progress on measures • Collecting metrics related to the SMART objectives will enable a program to report on its effectiveness

  36. Responsibility • The PART is the responsibility of the agency when reporting to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) • Important because the sponsoring federal agency is a critical program stakeholder

  37. Questions? Contact: Barry Nagle Director Center for Assessment, Planning, and Accountability United Negro College Fund Special Programs Corporation 2750 Prosperity Avenue, Suite 600 Fairfax, VA 22031 barry.nagle@uncfsp.org 703-205-8139 Barry Nagle President Evaluation and Action Research Associates (EARA) 2813 Lee Oaks Court #204 Falls Church, VA 22046 evaluationandactionresearch@gmail.com 301-529-0484