Download
cinema style television n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Cinema-Style Television PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Cinema-Style Television

Cinema-Style Television

110 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Cinema-Style Television

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Cinema-Style Television UFVA - 2011 64TH Anniversary of Cinema-Style Television 70th Anniversary of Convergence

  2. EIC • Entertainment Industry Caucus • Professors with entertainment industry experience • Share insights from firsthand experience • Help professionals transition to academe

  3. Panel Objectives • To encourage program structures and attitudes that mirror professional practice in order to prepare students for professional careers • To understand cinema’s future in a convergent world by looking at its past

  4. Panelists • “Framing Cinema-Style Television” • Peter Kiwitt • Visiting Assistant Professor, RIT • (TV Director, Writer, Executive) • “The Evolution of Storytelling in American Television” • David Carren • Associate Professor, UT - Pan American • (TV Writer) • “Cinema and Television: The Career Swinging Door” • Diane Walsh • Associate Professor, University of the Arts • (TV Executive, Producer)

  5. Framing Cinema-Style Television Peter Kiwitt http://peterkiwitt.wordpress.com

  6. Film or Television? • Fantasy Island

  7. Film or Television? • Fantasy Island • Lost

  8. Theoretical Frame

  9. Theoretical Frame

  10. Theoretical Frame

  11. Theoretical Frame

  12. Theoretical Frame

  13. Theoretical Frame

  14. Theoretical Frame

  15. Theoretical Frame

  16. Historical Frame

  17. Historical Frame

  18. Historical Frame

  19. Historical Frame

  20. Historical Frame

  21. Historical Frame

  22. Semantic Frame “Radio Movies” (1923) “Television film” . . . “Tele film” . . . “Telefilm” (1944) “Episodic” (1971) “Single-camera” (1972) Also: “Hour” “Drama” “Film”

  23. Semantic Frame “Cinema-style”

  24. Convergent Frame

  25. Convergent Frame

  26. Convergent Frame

  27. Convergent Frame

  28. Cinema Form, Television Medium • Fantasy Island • Lost

  29. Cinema-Style Television • Fantasy Island • Lost

  30. Conclusions • The cinema form is a production practice independent of content, technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio. • As both a form and a medium, cinema transcends digital driven convergence. • Students interested in making cinema-style television and new media are best served by studying cinema production.

  31. Conclusions • The cinema form is a production practice independent of content, technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio. • As both a form and a medium, cinema transcends digital driven convergence. • Students interested in making cinema-style television and new media are best served by studying cinema production.

  32. Conclusions • The cinema form is a production practice independent of content, technology, exhibition, budget, length, or aspect ratio. • As both a form and a medium, cinema transcends digital driven convergence. • Students interested in making cinema-style television and new media are best served by studying cinema production.

  33. Framing Cinema-Style Television Peter Kiwitt http://peterkiwitt.wordpress.com/what-is-cinema

  34. Cinema-Style Television Roundtable

  35. Addendum

  36. Historical Frame

  37. Semantic Frame “Motion pictures” (1915)“Cinema” (1918) “Film” (1920)

  38. Semantic Frame “Television” (1900)“Radio vision” (1923) “Radio movies” (1923)

  39. Semantic Frame

  40. Semantic Frame

  41. Semantic Frame

  42. Convergent Frame

  43. Convergent Frame

  44. Selected Chronology • 1878: First telephone Exchange; Telephonoscope cartoon • 1884: Paul Nipkow invents Nipkow disc (for mechanical TV) • 1895: “Trick” stop-camera in Mary Queen of Scots • 1894: C. Francis Jenkins projectS first moving images in US; he also publishes his first article on “transmitting pictures by electricity” • 1897: Joseph J. Thomson invents CRT (for electronic TV)

  45. Selected Chronology • 1900: ConstantinPerskyi coins “television” at the International Electricity Congress (translated from German to Russian to French to English) • 1906: Animation (Humorous Phases Of Funny Faces) • 1908: Traditional animation (Fantasmagorie) • 1916: Jenkins founds SMPE (becomes SMPTE in 1950) • 1920: Radio

  46. Selected Chronology • 1923: Jenkins articulates differences between “television,” “radio vision,” and “radio movies” • 1925: First public demonstrations of television (Baird and Jenkins). • 1928: First licensed experimental broadcasts (W2XB GE, W3XK Jenkins); David Sarnoff also predicts “radio television” and “radiomovies” • 1932: First experimental all electronic broadcasts (W3XE). • 1933: W6XAO airs original news film of earthquake

  47. Selected Chronology • 1939: First movie to air on TV (The Heart of New York) • 1941: Commercial broadcasting begins • 1944: MGM theatrical newsreel Patrolling the Ether premiers on TV • 1956: First practical videotape • 1965: First affordable consumer video; video art

  48. Selected Chronology • 1967: Portable consumer video; timecode editing introduced • 1973: 2D computer animation • 1976: 3D computer animation; portable broadcast video (field production) • 1986: Digital video • 2000: 24p video (Sony F900)

  49. “Episodic . . .” • 1948: “. . . Series” (Radio) • 1968: “. . . Television” (All) • 1971: “. . . Series“ (Cinema) • 1974: “. . . Television” (Cinema) • 1983: “. . . Show” (Cinema) • 1986: “. . . Production” (Cinema)