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Chapter 5

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Chapter 5

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  1. Chapter 5 The Human Body

  2. National EMS Education Standard Competencies • Anatomy and Physiology • Applies fundamental knowledge of the anatomy and function of all human systems to the practice of EMS.

  3. Anatomy versus Physiology How the body is made How the body works 3

  4. Introduction • A working knowledge of anatomy is important. • Knowledge of anatomy helps to communicate correct information: • To professionals, who know medical terms • To others, who may not understand medical terms

  5. Topographic Anatomy • Superficial landmarks • Serve as guides to structures that lie beneath them • Topographic anatomy applies to a body in the anatomic position. • Patient stands facing you, arms at side, palms forward.

  6. Regions of the body

  7. Planes of the Body • Imaginary straight lines that divide the body • Three main areas • Coronal plane: front/back • Transverse (axial) plane: top/bottom • Sagittal (lateral) plane: left/right

  8. Directional Terms • Midline: vertically through the middle of the patient’s body • Medial is toward the midline • Lateral is away from the midline. • Proximal is near a point of reference • Distal is away from the reference • Palmar refers to palms of the hand. • Plantar refers to sole of the feet Palmar Plantar

  9. Anatomical Planes • Midaxillary Line divides the body into anterior and posterior planes • Anterior is toward the front • Posterior is toward the back. • Superior is above, toward the head • Inferior is below, toward the feet. • Dorsal is toward the back/spine • Ventral is toward the front/belly.

  10. Chest Landmarks

  11. Chest Landmarks

  12. Body Cavities

  13. Movement Terms • Flexion is the bending of a joint. • Extension is the straightening of a joint. • Adduction is motion toward the midline. • Abduction is motion away from the midline.

  14. Other Directional Terms • Many structures are bilateral, appearing on both sides of midline. • Eyes • Lungs • Arms & Legs • Abdomen is divided into quadrants for communication purposes. • RUQ (Right Upper Quadrant) • LUQ (Left Upper Quadrant) • RLQ (Right Lower Quadrant) • LLQ (Left Lower Quadrant)

  15. Abdominal Organs

  16. Abdominal Organs In the Retroperitoneal space

  17. Anatomic Positions Fowler Prone Recovery Supine Shock

  18. Fowler Semi-Fowler <45° 45°to 60°

  19. The Skeletal System: Anatomy • Skeleton gives us our recognizable human form. • Protects vital internal organs • Contains • Bones • Ligaments • Tendons • Cartilage

  20. The Axial Skeleton • Foundation on which the arms and legs are hung. Includes: • Skull • Spinal column • Thorax

  21. The Axial Skeleton • Skull • Cranium—made up of 4 (MAJOR) bones • Occiput, temporal (2) and parietal • Face—made up of 14 bones • Foramen magnum is the opening at base of skull to allow the brain to connect to spinal cord. • Skull Bones • 2X Parietal Bones • 2X Temporal Bones • 1X Frontal Bone • 1XEthmoid Bone • 1X Occipital Bone  • 1X Sphenoid Bone

  22. The Axial Skeleton • Spinal column • Composed of 33 bones (vertebrae) • Spine divided into 5 sections: • Cervical • Thoracic • Lumbar • Sacrum • Coccyx

  23. The Axial Skeleton • Thorax • Formed by of 12 thoracic vertebrae and 12 pairs of ribs • Thoracic cavity contains • Heart • Lungs • Esophagus • Great vessels

  24. The Appendicular Skeleton • Arms, legs, their connection points, and pelvis • Includes: • Upper extremity • Pelvis • Lower extremity

  25. The Upper Extremity • Upper extremity extends from shoulder girdle to fingertips • Composed of arms, forearms, hands, fingers • Shoulder girdle • Three bones come together, allowing arm to be moved: • Clavicle, • Scapula, • Humerus

  26. The Upper Extremity • Arm • The humerus is the supporting bone of the arm. • The forearm consists of the radius and ulna. • Radius on lateral side of forearm • Ulna on medial side of forearm

  27. The Upper Extremity • Wrist and hand • Ball-and-socket joint • Principal bones • Carpals (8) • Metacarpals (5) • Phalanges (14)

  28. The Pelvis • Closed bony ring consisting of three bones • Sacrum • Two pelvic bones • Each pelvic bone is formed by fusion of ilium, ischium, and pubis. • Posteriorly, the ilium, ischium, and pubis bones are joined by the sacrum • Anteriorly, the pubic symphysis is where the right and left pubis are joined

  29. The Lower Extremity • Main parts are thigh, leg, foot. • Upper leg: femur (thigh bone) • Longest bone in body, femur connects into acetabulum (pelvic girdle) by ball-and-socket joint. • Greater and lesser trochanter are where major muscles of thigh connect to femur. Bones of the Lower Leg

  30. The Lower Extremity • Knee connects upper leg to lower leg • Kneecap (patella) • Lower Leg • Tibia (shin bone) • Anterior of leg • Fibula • Lateral side of leg • Ankle • A hinge joint • Allows flexion/extension of foot

  31. The Lower Extremity • Foot • Tarsal bones (7) • Metatarsal bones form substance of foot (5) • Toes are formed by phalanges (14)

  32. Joints • Occur wherever two bones come in contact

  33. (Hip) (Wrist) (Phalanges) (Elbow) (Wrist/Spine) (Ankle)

  34. The Skeletal System: Physiology • The skeletal system: • Gives body shape • Provides protection of fragile organs • Allows for movement • Stores calcium • Helps create blood cells

  35. The Musculoskeletal System: Anatomy • Musculoskeletal system provides: • Form • Upright posture • Movement • More than 600 muscles attach to bone. • Called skeletal (or voluntary) muscles

  36. The Musculoskeletal System: Anatomy • Smooth • Muscle • Involuntary • Nonstriated • Found in blood vessels • Skeletal Muscle • Voluntary • Movement • Protection • Cardiac • Muscle • Specialized • Automaticity • Intolerant of blood loss

  37. The Musculoskeletal System:Anatomy

  38. The Musculoskeletal System: Physiology • Contraction and relaxation of system make it possible to move and manipulate environment. • A byproduct of this movement is heat. • When you get cold, you shiver (shake muscles) to produce heat.

  39. The Respiratory System: Anatomy • Structures of the body that contribute to respiration (the process of breathing)

  40. Upper Airway • Upper airway includes • Pharynx • Nasopharynx • Oropharynx • Laryngopharynx • Larynx is anterior • Esophagus is posterior • Epiglottis • Prevents food and liquid from entering trachea

  41. Lower Airway • Larynx is the dividing line between upper and lower airway. • Adam’s apple/thyroid cartilage is anterior. • Cricoid cartilage/cricoid ring forms lowest portion of larynx. • Trachea • Ends at carina, dividing into right and left bronchi leading to bronchioles

  42. Lungs • The two lungs are held in place by: • Trachea • Arteries and veins • Pulmonary ligaments • Divided into lobes • Left has two lobes • Right has three lobes • Bronchi and bronchioles end with alveoli. • Alveoli allow for gas exchange. • Lungs are covered by smooth, glistening tissue called pleura

  43. Lower Airway

  44. Alveolar Respiration Cellular Respiration Levelsof CO2 Levelsof O2 Levelsof O2 Levelsof CO2

  45. Muscles of Breathing • Diaphragm is primary muscle. • 60-70% of breathing Effort • Also involved are: • Intercostal muscles • 30-40% of breathing Effort • Abdominal muscles • Pectoral muscles

  46. Ventilation

  47. The Respiratory System: Physiology • Function is to provide body with oxygen and eliminate carbon dioxide. • Ventilation and respiration are two separate, interdependent functions of the respiratory system. • Respiration is the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide in alveoli and tissue. • Brain stem controls breathing. (hypercapnic drive) • Hypoxic drive is backup system.

  48. The Respiratory System: Physiology • Hypercapnic drive (aka hypercarbic) • Normal impetus to breathe is the level of CO2 in arterial blood • Central chemoreceptors - located in the medulla • Hypoxic drive • This occurs when oxygen levels become the impetus to breathe • Peripheral chemoreceptors - located in the aortic arch and carotid artery bodies

  49. The Respiratory System: Physiology • Respiration (cont’d) • Medulla initiates ventilation cycles. • Dorsal respiratory group (DRG) • Initiates inspiration • Ventral respiratory group (VRG) • Provides forced inspiration or expiration when needed • Ventilation is simple air movement into and out of the lungs.

  50. The Respiratory System: Physiology • You provide ventilation when you breath for a patient. • Tidal volume is amount of air moved into or out of lungs in a single breath.