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MILITARY BRIEFINGS

MILITARY BRIEFINGS

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MILITARY BRIEFINGS

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  1. MILITARY BRIEFINGS “There are two types of speakers, those that are nervous and those that are liars.” Mark Twain

  2. References • Toogood, Granville “The Articulate Executive” McGraw-Hill, New York, 1996 • Hindle, Tom “Making Presentations” DK Publishers, New York, 1998 • Kirby, Tom “117 Ideas for Better Business Presentations” booklet • Laskowski, Lenny “Dynamic Presentation Skills for the Business Professional” • www.si.umich.ed/~pne/acadtalk.hmt • www.college.hmco.com/communications/ osborne • www.la.psu/speech/100a/workbook

  3. The Power of Briefing • Seizing opportunity • Look, sound and act more like a leader • Requires the right thinking and a correct attitude • Command the room, influence the audience “Just twelve minutes in front of the right audience can be worth more than a whole year behind your desk.”

  4. Types of Military Briefings • Information • Decision • Mission • Staff

  5. Formats • Staff Officers Guide • Chapter 5, Briefings • FM 101-5 Staff Organization & Operations - Appendix E, Military Briefings

  6. Characteristics of Good Briefings • Material is relevant, interesting, well organized, jargon free, well known • Voice is energetic, loud, clear, good pronunciation, not too fast or slow • Body language is relaxed • Eyes address the audience • Clothing is appropriate • Visual aids are clear, necessary

  7. Preparing Your Introduction“An invitation to listen” • Get your audience’s attention • Give people a reason to listen to your message • Give people a reason to listen to you • Consider the mood you want to set • Consider what you do best • Preview your message

  8. Involve your audience Relate a personal experience Ask a rhetorical question Create suspense Provide a dramatic example Use humor Open with a quotation Startle the audience Tell a story Preparing Your Introduction“Gaining attention”

  9. Building Perceptions of Integrity • Speak from responsible knowledge • Be honest • Be straightforward • Acknowledge opposing positions • Demonstrate personal commitment • Be concerned with the consequences of your words

  10. Perceptions of Competence(1 of 2) • Know and understand your topic • Refer to personal experiences with the topic • Acquire responsible knowledge • Cite authoritative sources

  11. Perceptions of Competence(2 of 2) • Organize your message so it is easy to follow • Pronounce words correctly • Present your briefing with confidence

  12. Organization of the Briefing • Introduction • Your chance to hook the audience • Tell the audience what you are going to say • Body • Tell the audience what you have to say • Provide details and examples of the topic • Conclusion • Tell the audience what you said • Summarize the main points of the body

  13. The Body One theme – one message Give Examples For Each Sub-topic Sub-topics 3 2 1 Nest outlines or summaries to keep audience tracking The Body

  14. The Rule of Threes People are naturally inclined to understand things in terms of three parts.

  15. Prepare Main Points • Prepare a research overview • Identify repeated information and ideas • Limit the number of your main points • Select points that fit your purpose • Select points that fit your audience

  16. Seven Types of Briefing Structures • Space: how parts fit to form a whole • Classification: sets up categories • Comparison: highlights similarities • Contrast: highlights differences

  17. Seven Types of Briefing Structures • Cause-Effect: shows a relationship • Problem-Solution: persuasive • Time: events or steps in a process

  18. Transitions Tell……and show Show and Tell

  19. Useful Transitions“Explanation” • For example • To illustrate • For instance • In other words • To simplify • To clarify • Case in point Captain Murphy

  20. Useful Transitions“Importance” • Most importantly • Above all • Keep this in mind • Remember • Listen carefully • Take note of • Indeed Dr. Alan Keyes

  21. Useful Transitions“Numerical order” • First • Second • In the first place • To begin with • Initially • Subsequently • Eventually • Finally Dr. Evil

  22. Compared with Both are Likewise In comparison Similarly Alike Of equal importance Another type of Like Just as Useful Transitions“Comparisons

  23. Common MistakesWhen Using Transitions • DON’T use transitions at all • Using transitions that are too short to bridge to the next idea • Using the same transition throughout the briefing Use Stickees on your notes!

  24. The Physical Dimension Behind the Lectern

  25. Gestures • Respond naturally to what you think, feel and see • Create the condition for gesturing, not the gesture • Make your gestures convincing • Make them smooth and well timed

  26. Movement • Why move? • Forces people to focus and follow you • Natural • Relieve stress and relax • Use three positions • Home position • Two relatively near • the home position • Three steps, moving at a shallow angle

  27. The EYES • Know your material well • rehearse enough so you do not have to depend heavily on notes • Up, down, up! • Establish a personal bond with listeners • Select one person (5 to 10 seconds) • Then shift • Show sincerity and interest in your audience • Monitor visual feedback • Actively seek out valuable feedback • Volume, bored, puzzled

  28. What Comes Out of Your Mouth • Vary the pitch of your voice • Speak loudly and clearly • Slow down, pause • Use conversational tone • Listen, do you hear “ahs” and “ums” • Focus on the bottom (deepest pitch) of your voice range

  29. Enthusiasm“A combat multiplier for briefings” • Enthusiasm is contagious • We judge others by their behavior • If it is important enough to talk about…. • Feedback - what do you see? • Appreciation • Surprise • Genuine delight • Remember, this is person to person! Barbara Jordon

  30. How to Remember the Material • Memorizing • Reading from complete text • Using notes • Using visual aids as notes

  31. Preparing Your Conclusion“Providing closure” • Signal the speech is coming to an end • Summarize the main points • What mood you want to sustain • Consider what you do best • Give listeners something to remember • Issue a call for action if appropriate

  32. Controlling Nervousness • Know your subject cold. Be over-prepared. • Talk to one person at a time. • Stand up straight. Breath properly. • Know exactly what your opening line is going to be. • Say to yourself, “I know what I am going to say and I’m glad for this chance to say it.” When you are in command of your briefing, you come across as a leader.

  33. Overcoming Speaking Anxiety(1 of 2) • Know the room • Know the audience • Know the material • Learn how to relax • Visualize yourself speaking

  34. Overcoming Speaking Anxiety(2 of 2) • Realize people want you to succeed • Don’t apologize for being nervous • Concentrate on your message • Turn nervousness into positive energy • Gain experience He who fails to prepare is preparing for failure

  35. Handling Questions • Repeat so the entire audience hears • Pause, reflect on the question before answering • Avoid prolonged discussions with one person • If you can’t answer it, just say so • Don’t make stuff up AFLAC!

  36. Practice • The single most important factor for success • Reflects upon you and your attitude towards the material and audience • Practice all parts equally • Rule of thumb 10 practice runs for any one presentation

  37. Don’t Let Your Briefing End Up Like This Rehearse, Rehearse and Rehearse! Thank God it wasn’t a moose!